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e-Book Wednesdays were Pretty Normal: A Boy, Cancer, And God download

e-Book Wednesdays were Pretty Normal: A Boy, Cancer, And God download

by Michael Kelley

ISBN: 1433671697
ISBN13: 978-1433671692
Language: English
Publisher: B&H Books (March 1, 2012)
Pages: 264
Category: Christian Living
Subategory: Christian Books

ePub size: 1352 kb
Fb2 size: 1116 kb
DJVU size: 1599 kb
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 953
Other Formats: azw mobi lrf mbr

Over the next few days we will be focusing on a new and powerful book by Michael Kelley entitled Wednesday’s Were Pretty Normal: A Boy . The Foundation of Communion with God: The Trinitarian Piety of John Owen.

Over the next few days we will be focusing on a new and powerful book by Michael Kelley entitled Wednesday’s Were Pretty Normal: A Boy, Cancer, and God. You will have an opportunity to read the true story behind the book, view an encouraging video, and register to win a free copy.

Wednesdays were Pretty Normal: A Boy, Cancer, And Go.

Wednesdays were Pretty Normal: A Boy, Cancer, And God. by Michael Kelley. Wednesdays were pretty normal, writes Michael Kelley, looking for a bright spot amidst the chemotherapy routine brought on by his two-year-old son Joshua’s cancer diagnosis. His book of the same name offers much to anyone who’s tired of prescriptive spirituality and would rather acknowledge and work through the difficulties of faith with some transparency. Joshua battled and beat the disease, but not before his family had to reconcile what it means to believe in God despite a broken.

Wednesdays were pretty normal, writes Michael Kelley, looking for a bright spot amidst the chemotherapy routine brought on by his two-year-old son Joshua’s cancer diagnosis. Jos Wednesdays were pretty normal, writes Michael Kelley, looking for a bright spot amidst the chemotherapy routine brought on by his two-year-old son Joshua’s cancer diagnosis

Husband, Dad, Lifeway Director of Discipleship, author of BORING.

Husband, Dad, Lifeway Director of Discipleship, author of BORING:FINDING AN EXTRAORDINARY GOD IN AN ORDINARY LIFE and WEDNESDAYS WERE PRETTY NORMAL

Michael Kelley michaelkelley. 2018 4 May. Indicatives and imperatives

Michael Kelley michaelkelley. Indicatives and imperatives. Growing Down: Unlearning the Patterns of Adulthood that Keep Us from Jesus Wednesdays Were Pretty Normal: A Boy, Cancer, and God Transformational Discipleship: How People Really Grow Boring: Finding an Extraordinary God in an Ordinary Life.

Where We Were in Vietnam: A Comprehensive Guide to the Firebases and Militar. ISBN 9781555716257 (978-1-55571-625-7) Softcover, Hellgate Press, 2010.

Wednesdays were Pretty Normal is a very honest look at Kelley's struggle through his son's cancer treatment .

Wednesdays were Pretty Normal is a very honest look at Kelley's struggle through his son's cancer treatment: How faith needed to turn from an abstract concept into something active How we need to stop trying to minimize or self-medicate away our pain and actually see it for what it is How suffering isn't an excuse to question God's character. Kelley's greatest strength in this book is that he doesn't offer a sanitized version of events.

What others are saying. Wednesdays Were Pretty Normal: A Boy, Cancer, And God by Michael Kelley ebook deal. Tuesday’s Christian eBooks: Early Reads. Free and Bargain Kindle and Nook eBooks: Vehn Mathieu possesses one of the most recognizable faces on the planet.

Michael Kelley serves as the Director of Groups Ministry for LifeWay. As a communicator, Michael speaks across the country at churches, conference, and retreats and in the author of Wednesdays Were Pretty Normal: A Boy, Cancer, and God, Transformational Discipleship, and Boring: Finding an Extraordinary God in an Ordinary Life. The entire video is above, and the transcript is below.

Wednesdays were pretty normal. The true story of a father who wrestles with faith in God throughout his two-year-old son's victorious battle with cancer, discovering that pain sometimes opens the door to a deeper experience with Jesus. a boy, cancer, and God.

“Wednesdays were pretty normal,” writes Michael Kelley, looking for a bright spot amidst the chemotherapy routine brought on by his two-year-old son Joshua’s cancer diagnosis. His book of the same name offers much to anyone who’s tired of prescriptive spirituality and would rather acknowledge and work through the difficulties of faith with some transparency. Joshua battled and beat the disease, but not before his family had to reconcile what it means to believe in God despite a broken world. His dad’s personal account of that fight to survive sparks a larger discussion of how Christians must learn to walk in the light of Christ’s promises despite the dark shadows of earthly pain. Indeed, it’s pain that sometimes opens the door to a deeper experience with Jesus, an authentic relationship that holds steady even when life loses the comfort of normalcy.Endorsements: "Get ready to go on a remarkable journey . . .  Faith is more than a gift we're given; it's a tool we must exercise and use in order to experience its supernatural power. Michael Kelley poignantly illustrates the process of turning faith from a noun to a verb and how it can transform and shape our ability to persevere. Everyone needs to read this book."Pete Wilson, author of Plan B "Anyone who has ever had a sick child will find much needed words of comfort, encouragement, and a powerful reminder that you're not alone. Whether for yourself or your friends, you'll discover divine solace in these pages."Margaret Feinberg, author of Scouting the Divine and Hungry for God "A huge man and a tiny child walk hand in hand through these pages, then right out of the book and into your heart.  Read it for your own edification, if you wish!  But be alert, there are other parents you may not have noticed, who grieve quietly and are much afraid . . . They need this book."Calvin Miller, author of The Singer trilogy "In the midst of a battle no wants to face, Michael wrestled issues about God and faith and the difficulty of life that most of us will in some way. Honest, heart breaking but beating loudly with hope, Wednesdays were pretty normal is a beautiful book." Jon Acuff, author of Quitter and Stuff Christians Like "Michael points back to a God that is deeper than the pain and doubts, and guides us beyond Christian platitudes to genuine rest in the arms of our heavenly Father. I look forward to recommending this book to people in our church."J.D. Greear, author of Gospel "Michael Kelley is a gifted communicator and offers the church in this generation much promise. I am pleased not only to recommend this book, but also to commend this faithful servant of the Lord."Thom S. Rainer, president and CEO of LifeWay Christian Resources   "This is not a sentimental memoir or another theoretical look at suffering. Instead, Michael leads us to the intersection of faith and life, of God's love and our pain, of God's plan and our questions."Trevin Wax, author of Counterfeit Gospels and Holy Subversion 

"I feel very strongly that this story is one that must be shared again and again. You'll find yourself seeing faith, hope, and ultimately, God, in a much more intimate way than you have before."Mark Batterson, author of In a Pit with a Lion on a Snowy Day ". .  . It is also a story about hope and the God whose love reaches us in the deepest depths, the God whose middle name is Surprise! You must read this book!"Timothy George, founding dean, Beeson Divinity School of Samford University

Comments:
MARK BEN FORD
I got this book because I wanted to read how the author worked through the difficulties he faced when his son was diagnosed with Leukaemia. My son does not have cancer, but he does have several medical conditions which place us in and out of the hospital quite frequently. He has daily medicines and medical equipment. He's been through many, many surgeries. I had the "Why me, God?" feeling, and while I can't relate to the author's specific feelings because everyone's experience is different, I can understand what it feels like to sit up through the night, worrying about everything. Will he survive? Why did this happen to us? This book helped me see how the author dealt with these questions and others. His experiences with becoming one of "those people" rang true. Nobody ever expects difficult things to happen; when something does happen, it helps to know that others have similar feelings. Struggling through hard times and working through them is a difficult process, but knowing that you aren't alone helps. I'm truly sorry that the author and his family had to go through something so difficult (I don't wish that on anybody), but it was nice that he was able to put his feelings into words that can be helpful/inspirational to others.

Saberblade
When you first become a parent, you're blown away by the immensity of the responsibility. Suddenly there's this little person who you're responsible for, who depends on you for, well, everything. But after the shock wears off, routines get established, and your kids start sleeping regularly through the night, you settle into a new normal. And it's a lot of fun.

Until your child is diagnosed with leukemia.

That's what happened to Michael Kelley and his wife when their son, Joshua, was just two years old. And instantly, their world was torn apart--including their faith. His recently released book, Wednesdays were Pretty Normal: A Boy, Cancer, And God, takes readers on his family's journey with cancer and it to deepen their understanding of what it means to have "faith."

Many books have been written about suffering. Some are preventative medicine, helping you develop theological categories to understand what's coming. Some seek to encourage readers in the midst of trial and suffering. And then there are books like this one--books that are best described as "devotional theology." Wednesdays were Pretty Normal is a very honest look at Kelley's struggle through his son's cancer treatment:

* How faith needed to turn from an abstract concept into something active
* How we need to stop trying to minimize or self-medicate away our pain and actually see it for what it is
* How suffering isn't an excuse to question God's character

Kelley's greatest strength in this book is that he doesn't offer a sanitized version of events. He doesn't paint himself as a model of faith or heroism in the face of the family's crisis. Instead, he goes to work and cries at his desk. He cries out to God in frustration. He wrestles with this whole question of "God's plan":

"You see the problem just as I did. If my family was really going to choose faith, then we would have to come to grips with the fact that there are parts of God and His plan that at best we don't understand; at worst we don't even like. We could no longer pick and choose certain parts of our belief system; we had to embrace all of it." (Kindle location 277)

This is a great word to so many of us. It's not a soft, "don't worry, God's got it all under control," said in a really well-meaning sort of way that really frustrates you. This is super-honest (and interestingly not too dissimilar to what we were thinking after a pastor tried his best to comfort us during a trial we faced some years ago). It's so easy for us North Americans to take the parts we like about the Christian faith and leave the rest. But God doesn't let us get away with that. And when suffering comes, we find out what our faith is really made of.

Probably the most helpful reminder for me in reading this book comes nearer to the end when Kelley talks about the fact that believing isn't just mental assent. It takes work:

"You don't "just believe." Believing is work. Hard work. . . . Christianity is about believing, but make no mistake: believing is work. Problem is that many of us are working hard at the wrong thing. We're working hard not to sin. We're working hard to be generous. We're working hard to read the Bible. What we should be working hard to do is believe in each and every one of those situations. We believe that in each of those individual moments, God's resources of grace, power, patience, hope, and endurance won't run dry. We believe in Him as the great supplier of what we need, and we do so one need at a time." (Kindle locations 1911, 1927)

How often do we assume we've got an endless supply of "faith"? How often do we treat the Christian life--or see it depicted--as if it should be a breeze, smooth sailing all the way. Effortless quiet times every day. A fulfilling prayer life. An unceasingly generous spirit... Kelley's reminder that these things take work-grace-driven effort as D.A. Carson puts it--is a much needed reminder that the Christian life isn't going to be easy. But the work is so worth it.

There are so many great takeaways in Wednesdays were Pretty Normal that it's honestly a bit difficult to summarize. Everyone's going to go away with different, whether it's seeing that experiencing suffering doesn't mean God has somehow failed us, or seeing that cherry-picking your theology doesn't cut it when times really get tough. Whether you've experienced a great deal of suffering, or haven't yet done so, there will be much that can be learned from Kelley's experience. Get a copy of the book, be challenged, be encouraged, and be hopeful that when we're told God purposes all things for our good according to his purposes, it really is a good thing.

Nuadador
Wednesdays were Pretty Normal: A Boy, Cancer……… by Michael Kelley. When I first started to read this book I thought this book would be about the father’s journey through his son’s cancer ordeal. I was surprised to read all the scripture base references which explained God’s reasoning? for why the events in this journey happened. It was so remarkable how the author was ability to couple the biblical references to his faithful suffering as he lived thru his family’s ordeal. At times the scripture references and the stories from the Bible were too much for me to experience. Often when I read the Bible I cannot absorb the words and their meaning without saying to myself “STOP this is too much for me to take in”. I said that to myself many times reading this book, yet I continued to read more. I thought the author’s definition of “faith” was his gift to the readers. This book gave a true life definition to the Christian’s difficulty and pain of keeping their faith in God as quoted from the Bible. Michael Kelley truly defined Christian Faith.

Ttyr
This book was amazing! Painful to read but so helpful in facing hard questions that come if we desire an honest faith in God. My comments are not a summary of this book, but more my response to it. Pain can bring us into a deeper relationship with God than we ever thought possible! It brings us to true childlike dependence which is a more honest position than we ever wanted to admit to. Religion is a form of manipulation in order to gain some control over difficulties in our lives. In contrast, a faith-filled walk with the only True God is a relationship with a Father who finally brings us into restful flourishing submission. Submission is not a very popular word in our society and carries with it some very negative connotations. But true holy submission to a loving God brings a fullness and beauty and ultimate fruitfulness. In that context we can become everything we were created to be.

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