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e-Book Selling Out the Church: The Dangers of Church Marketing download

e-Book Selling Out the Church: The Dangers of Church Marketing download

by James L. Street,Philip D. Kenneson

ISBN: 159244296X
ISBN13: 978-1592442966
Language: English
Publisher: Cascade Books; 1st edition (July 24, 2003)
Pages: 176
Category: Churches and Church Leadership
Subategory: Christian Books

ePub size: 1220 kb
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DJVU size: 1660 kb
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 893
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Kenneson and Street powerfully asks, what if the mission of the church is not to grow simply in numbers, but rather .

Kenneson and Street powerfully asks, what if the mission of the church is not to grow simply in numbers, but rather, what if the goal of the church was simply to manifest the fruits of the Spirit as seen in Galatians 5? Church marketers would shutter at such a thought, for their is no way to translate such things into numerical data. 5 people found this helpful.

Kenneson and Street have composed an excellent critique of a discipline that has become almost second nature in. .

Kenneson and Street have composed an excellent critique of a discipline that has become almost second nature in many church circles, even despite its limited applicability. As much of this modern vision of the church stems from the discipline of Church Marketing, Philip Kenneson and James Street’s Selling Out the Church: The Dangers of Church Marketing is a useful and refreshing critique of an influential philosophy. Most importantly, the book departs from a general discomfort with church marketing and precisely identifies where this school of thought departs from the Biblical model of the church.

Phillip Kenneson and James Street have written Selling Out the Church: The Dangers of Church Marketing, with a bigger question in mind, however

Phillip Kenneson and James Street have written Selling Out the Church: The Dangers of Church Marketing, with a bigger question in mind, however. They ask, "Can the market-driven church remain Christ's church?" One may argue that Kenneson and Street face a danger of their own in writing such a book, the danger of theological nit-picking. Sometimes, critiques of enormously successful ventures are driven by something other than sincerity

Selling Out the Church book. Selling Out the Church The Dangers of Church Marketing. 159244296X (ISBN13: 9781592442966).

Selling Out the Church book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Selling Out the Church. by. Philip D. Kenneson.

By: Philip D. Kenneson, James L. Street. Title: Selling Out the Church By: Philip D. Street Format: Hardcover Number of Pages: 178 Vendor: Cascade Books Publication Date: 2003

By: Philip D. Street Format: Hardcover Number of Pages: 178 Vendor: Cascade Books Publication Date: 2003. Dimensions: . 0 X . 1 X . 6 (inches) Weight: 13 ounces ISBN: 1498210023 ISBN-13: 9781498210027 Stock No: WW8210027.

KENNESON, Philip . i James L. Selling Out the Church: The Dangers of Church Marketing. Eugene, Or. Cascade Books. Czy zagraża nam język popchrześcijaństwa? O nowych zjawiskach w polskim dyskursie religijnym pierwszych dekad XXI wieku.

He is the author along with James Street, of Selling Out the Church: The Dangers of Church Marketing . Kenneson teaches adult Sunday school at Munsey Memorial United Methodist Church

He is the author along with James Street, of Selling Out the Church: The Dangers of Church Marketing (Abingdon Press, 1997); Beyond Sectarianism: Re-Imagining Church and World (Trinity Press, 1999); and Life on the Vine: Cultivating the Fruit of the Spirit in Christian Community (1999), which has been translated into Spanish, Chinese, and Korean. Kenneson teaches adult Sunday school at Munsey Memorial United Methodist Church.

Philip D. Street, Selling Out the Church: The Dangers of Church Marketing. David Hopkins, Control Alt Delete: Rebooting the Purpose-driven church. John H. Armstrong, The Mad Rush to Seeker Sensitive Worship. It involves a lengthy along with tools to analyze the data. He argues that healthy churches exhibit these eight characteristics

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Philip D Kenneson books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles.

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St Philip's Church is an Anglican parish church in the deanery of Salford, the archdeaconry of Salford, and the diocese of Manchester. It is located at Wilton Place, just off Chapel Street, Salford, Greater Manchester, England

St Philip's Church is an Anglican parish church in the deanery of Salford, the archdeaconry of Salford, and the diocese of Manchester. It is located at Wilton Place, just off Chapel Street, Salford, Greater Manchester, England. The church was relaunched in 2016 as Saint Philips Chapel Street, described as an old church on a new journey: a church plant in partnership with New Wine.

Marketing the church is hot. For many church leaders, marketing might even be the first article of their creed, which goes something like this: "We believe that our church determines its identity and mission through the tactics of marketing strategies." Theologians Kenneson and Street offer a thoughtful and provocative protest, with a foreword from Stanley Hauerwas. The authors "expose the theological presuppositions that inform the marketing project. . . and help us to see that the marketer's presumption that form can be separated from content of the gospel betrays an understanding of the gospel that cannot help betraying the gift that is Christ." The authors propose an alternative, constructive account of the church's mission and purpose that is "not based on exchange of value but on reminding us that the gospel is always a gift - a gift that makes impossible any presumptions that there can be an exchange between human beings and God that is rooted in the satisfaction of our untrained needs." The cross and resurrection challenge the world's understanding of what our needs should be.
Comments:
Manris
This is an EXCELLENT book for any Pastor or Church leader to read. It is amazingly helpful for anyone seeking to rid their ministries of unneeded fluff. Too often have we let American (Western) culture shape the minds of God's people and His Church. But Kennison and Street do a remarkable job of sifting through the enticing attractions of a marketing orientation to reveal its destructive nature when applied to Christ's Church. I highly recommend this book to anyone tired of our Chrurch's inability to shake itself free of the bonds of cultural influence.
This book is a reminder of the Church's important role of being a sign, a fortaste, and a herald of Christ's Kingdom, and explains how our willingness to accept cultural trends keeps us from realizing this God-given task.

Bludsong
CG is marketing. These authors show that is unbiblical but yet so attractive in a consumer-oriented (marketing) culture.
They do a fine job in sorting this out. I use several quotes from them in my book of a similar vein, Testing the Claims of Church Growth.
One of the exceptional elements of this work is their focus on the destruction of the transcendancy of God. Reading this book will inform if not transform many fliring with church marketing, i.e. CG.

Dakora
Much has been written in recent years about marketing the church. Of all the books I've read, both for and against marketing the church, few have been as helpful or as biblical as Selling Out the Church. The authors set out to answer the question of whether the market-drive church can remain Christ's church. While many proponents of church marketing consider this debate to be over, the authors of this book consider it wide open. "We hope to enable a more robust debate about the wisdom of employing church marketing by articulating as clearly as we can what we take to be its dangers" (page 16). They ask the reader to consider this book "a contribution to what we hope is a churchwide conversation about the identity, character, and mission of the church, and more specifically about the wisdom of employing marketing thinking and practices in the service of that church" (page 17).

Church marketers believe that marketing is a neutral force, in that it shapes only the form of the church while leaving the function alone. Kenneson and Street disagree, for they believe that the convictions that shape marketing are at cross purposes with the convictions of Christians.

Following an introduction to the history of marketing, where the reader sees how society has passed through three eras, the production era, the sales era and now the marketing era, the authors answer the church marketers who taught that Jesus and His apostles used marketing to further their ministry in New Testament times. While Jesus used components of marketing, they show that He did not subscribe to a marketing orientation as do the church marketers. In short, they show that there is no biblical basis to support such a marketing orientation. In fact, the marketing orientation is antithetical to Christianity because it presupposes an exchange mindset in which goods or services pass between parties. Yet the Gospel is a message of grace. There is no equal exchange. Instead, God gives us a gift of grace. A marketing mindset may lead us to feel that God has an obligation towards us (in which we exchange service for blessing) or may lead us to seek reciprocity in relationships, despite the biblical emphasis on self-denial.

"We believe that placing a marketing orientation at the center of the church's life radically alters the shape and character of the Christian faith by redefining the character and mission of the church in terms of manageable exchanges between producers and consumers. Much that is central to the Christian life will not fit neatly into the management/marketing scheme, and, not surprisingly, these matters are neglected in a marketing paradigm." (page 62).

The authors go on to examine the false understanding that the church is primarily a service agency that exists to meet the needs of the "consumer," believer and unbeliever alike. This view teaches that a felt need is a legitimate need because in a marketing paradigm the customer is always right. At the heart of marketing is an assumption that theology has long denied - that people know what is best for them. Scripture teaches the exact opposite - that the church has something people need, but something these people do not want and do not know they need! The church has no business asking unbelievers (ie consumers) what they would like in a church, for the church already knows their deepest need.

A chapter entitled "The Baby Boomerang" examines the danger of the marketing practices of segmenting, targeting and positioning. While segmenting is a practice that comes naturally to humans, who naturally gravitate towards people like ourselves, we do so along "natural" lines that are in reality social constructs. We look to the population of a town and divide them along socio-economic lines and assume that God does too. When the church relies on marketing strategies that reach only a certain segment of the population, the church is excused from having to be genuinely transformed to reach the world. We need to change only a little in order to reach people who are just like us, but we need to change radically to reach people who are radically different. "The unspoken message of target marketing is that the church need not be different from the world; it simply needs to package itself differently, position itself properly, and enjoy the benefits that come from engaging in mutually beneficial exchanges with its target market" (page 93).

The authors begin to put all of these concepts together in the sixth chapter. They show that marketers understand that the appeal of the marketing approach is the fixation our society has on control, measurement and effectiveness. Marketing, at its core, is an attempt to control the future. Furthermore, marketing is premised upon the need to move towards the future with limited resources of time, manpower and finances. Yet Christ tells us that in Him we have abundance! We do not need to worry so much about where we are going or how we are going to get there. Rather we need to ensure that we are learning from God along the way as He shapes us into the men and women He wants us to be. Kenneson and Street question where church marketers leave room for God in the grand drama of the church. They also point out the danger in valuing measurable objectives because this tends to filter out theological objectives that cannot be neatly weighed and measured. Thus goals tend to be number-driven even though numbers are not a reliable indicator of theological depth and understanding.

The crux of the matter is this. The authors believe that the church is called to be a sign, foretaste and herald of the kingdom. This phrase is repeated often because it stands at odds with the understanding that the church is a service agency. Strangely, if there is a weakness in this book, it is that the authors did not do much to prove that this is the purpose of the church. If a person reads Selling Out the Church who is not convinced of this premise, the book may do little to change his mind.

Reading through my review I can see that I have done little to indicate just how thoroughly I enjoyed this book. What can I say, but that of the fifty plus books I have read thus far in 2005, this is one of the top two or three. I would recommend it to any pastor or person who ministers within a church.

Capella
A must-read for churches flirting with the allures of the church growth movement. Kenneson and Street offer a solid biblical-theological expose of the contemporary church's preoccupation with numbers, felt-needs, and likability. Their alternative is a helpful contribution to the conversation of how to "be" the church in a secularized, technocratic society. This said, the book falls short in a few key areas. First, the writers do little to demonstrate how a commitment to church as counterculture appears on a practical level (i.e. what does this church "look like?") Second, one could easily accuse Kenneson and Street of addressing church from the lofty perch of academia (i.e. pastors suspicious of academic theologians will be inclined to dismiss the book as just another potshot at the church by two men disgruntled by their own inability to make a difference). Third, a critic could easily say that the book itself--with its nice, glossy cover and forward by Stanley Hauerwas--ironically demonstrates the necessity of marketing and packaging in our consumerist culture (i.e. why didn't Abingdon see fit to put a plain brown cover around the 150+ pages if we are to be so concerned with our cultures obsession with consumer appetite? Why not have the forward written by someone who will not at face value lead more people to purchase the book?). Ultimately, these criticisms do not weigh against the prophetic truths Kenneson and Street will bring to the few pastors with ears to hear.
In their follow up volume, Kenneson and Street would do well to bring onto their writing team a pastor who shares their passion for the church but brings with that passion a commitment to manifesting counterculture outside the walls of seminary.

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