pbstudio
e-Book A Bitter Trial: Evelyn Waugh and John Cardinal Heenan on the Liturgical Changes download

e-Book A Bitter Trial: Evelyn Waugh and John Cardinal Heenan on the Liturgical Changes download

by Evelyn Waugh,Cardinal John Heenan,Alcuin Reid

ISBN: 158617522X
ISBN13: 978-1586175221
Language: English
Publisher: Ignatius Press; Expanded edition edition (September 15, 2011)
Pages: 128
Category: Churches and Church Leadership
Subategory: Christian Books

ePub size: 1397 kb
Fb2 size: 1881 kb
DJVU size: 1325 kb
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 399
Other Formats: rtf lrf docx azw

The book begins with an essay penned by Waugh and published in the British Spectator, November 1962, The Same Again, Please.

It also includes some letters to and from a few close friends and relatives. All correspondence concerns the Vatican II Council and the liturgical changes it spawned, and the detrimental effect these changes had on many devout Catholics. The book begins with an essay penned by Waugh and published in the British Spectator, November 1962, The Same Again, Please. In it, Waugh expresses trepidation as to what the new Second Vatican Council might do.

In John Cardinal Heenan, Waugh found a sympathetic pastor and somewhat of a kindred spirit. This volume brings together the personal correspondence between Waugh and Heenan during the 1960s, a trying period for many faithful Catholics

In John Cardinal Heenan, Waugh found a sympathetic pastor and somewhat of a kindred spirit. This volume brings together the personal correspondence between Waugh and Heenan during the 1960s, a trying period for many faithful Catholics. It begins with a 1962 article Waugh wrote for the Spectator followed by a response from then Archbishop Heenan, who at the time was a participant at the Second Vatican Council

In John Cardinal Heenan, Waugh found a sympathetic pastor and somewhat of a kindred spirit. It begins with a 1962 article Waugh wrote for the Spectator followed by a response from then Archbishop Heenan, who at the time was a participant at the Second Vatican Council.

John Carmel Heenan (26 January 1905 – 7 November 1975) was an English prelate of the Roman Catholic Church

John Carmel Heenan (26 January 1905 – 7 November 1975) was an English prelate of the Roman Catholic Church Contents Quotes. A church that is half empty is half full.

Sacrosanctum Concilium and the Reform of the Liturgy ed. Kenneth D. Whitehead. For she is preparing a book, Collects of the Roman Missal: A Study in Liturgical Reform, in which she examines the ideologically inspired theological evacuation that took place in the reform of the prayers proper to each day in the liturgical year. At Oxford, Dr Pristas presented a paper on the reform of the prayers for Lent.

John Heenan was born in Ilford, Essex, the youngest of four children of Irish parents John and Anne Heenan (née .

John Heenan was born in Ilford, Essex, the youngest of four children of Irish parents John and Anne Heenan (née Pilkington). He auditioned for Westminster Cathedral Choir School at age 9, but Sir Richard Terry rejected him for his "metallic voice". Heenan studied at St. Ignatius College in Stamford Hill, Ushaw College in Durham, and the Venerable English College in Rome before being ordained to the priesthood on 6 July 1930 Quotes.

By Evelyn Waugh, Cardinal John Heenan. Author Cardinal John Heenan. As a comic writer, satirist and master of English prose, EVELYN WAUGH (1903-1966) has been admired more than any other novelist of his generation. See all 4 brand new listings. Brand new: lowest price.

by Evelyn Waugh and John Heenan. Select Format: Hardcover.

Foreword by Joseph Pearce Afterword by Clare Asquith, Countess of Oxford Edited by Alcuin Reid

English author Evelyn Waugh, most famous for his novel Brideshead Revisited, became a Roman Catholic in 1930. For the last decade of his life, however, Waugh experienced the changes being made to the Church's liturgy to be nothing short of "a bitter trial". In John Cardinal Heenan, Waugh found a sympathetic pastor and somewhat of a kindred spirit.

This volume brings together the personal correspondence between Waugh and Heenan during the 1960s, a trying period for many faithful Catholics. It begins with a 1962 article Waugh wrote for the Spectator followed by a response from then Archbishop Heenan, who at the time was a participant at the Second Vatican Council. These and the other writings included in this book paint a vivid picture of two prominent and loyal English Catholics who lamented the loss of Latin and the rupture of tradition that resulted from Vatican II.

In the light of the pontificate of Pope Benedict XVI, many Catholics are looking again at the post-conciliar liturgical changes. To this "reform of the reform" of the liturgy now underway in the Roman Catholic Church, both Heenan and Waugh have much to contribute.

Comments:
Grotilar
What is most interesting about this book is the way Bishop Keen seemed to change positions from tradition to modernist as the council progressed. It appears great pressure was brought down upon to bishop to capitulate. At one point the bishop states the the truth changes over time, a very modernist notion that is the root of the evil brought forth since the council.

Arar
I often wonder what it was like for Catholics who endured those years of modernist meddling in the liturgy of the Church that followed Vatican II, those poor souls for whom the Latin Mass was the nearest thing to heaven on earth. I’m interested because, having fallen in love with the Traditional Latin Mass myself, and as a Catholic bewildered that the Church could have so carelessly squandered such a beautiful, deep, and moving liturgy, I wonder how I would have reacted to the changes, had I been a Catholic in those dark days. I suspect, much like Evelyn Waugh.

Evelyn Waugh, English writer [of Brideshead Revisited fame] and Catholic convert (1930), expressed his sentiments on the changes in a letter dated 30 March 1966, one month before dying on Easter Sunday:

.... Easter used to mean so much to me. Before Pope John and his Council -- they destroyed the beauty of the liturgy. I have not yet soaked myself in petrol and gone up in flames, but I now cling to the Faith doggedly without joy. Church-going is a pure duty parade. I shall not live to see it restored. It is worse in many countries... [96]

A BITTER TRIAL is a slim volume of correspondence between Evelyn Waugh and Cardinal Heenan from 1962 to Waugh’s death in 1966. It also includes some letters to and from a few close friends and relatives. All correspondence concerns the Vatican II Council and the liturgical changes [abuses] it spawned, and the detrimental effect these changes had on many devout Catholics.

Every attendance at Mass leaves me without comfort or edification. I shall never, pray God, apostatize but church-going is now a bitter trial.[letter to Archbiship Heenan, 1965]

The book begins with an essay penned by Waugh and published in the British Spectator, November 1962, “The Same Again, Please.” In it, Waugh expresses trepidation as to what the new Second Vatican Council might do. He was well aware of the modernist wind blowing through the Church, and was already disappointed with the changes in the Easter Holy Week services.

In a 1965 diary entry, Waugh says:

More than the aesthetic changes which rob the Church of poetry, mystery and dignity, there are suggested changes in Faith and morals which alarm me. A kind of anti-clericalism is abroad which seeks to reduce the priest’s unique sacramental position. The Mass is written of as a “social meal” in which the “people of God” perform the consecration.

Pray to God I will never apostatize but I can only now go to church as an act of duty and obedience -- just as a sentry at Buck House is posted with no possibility of his being employed to defend the sovereign’s life. [79]

A BITTER TRIAL is an interesting look beyond all the modernist celebrations over the Second Vatican Council wreckage, and shows us the other side, one pious Catholic’s views. I’m sure Waugh spoke for many tradition-minded Catholics, as he still does today. And I’m reminded of a line from William F. Buckley, another Catholic who was none too keen on the changes in the liturgy: “I am a practicing Roman Catholic who finds attendance at the new Mass an aesthetic ordeal... I find attendance at Mass less satisfying than it used to be.”

From the Foreward by Joseph Pearce:

Waugh’s love for the Mass is evident throughout this volume, and the “bitter trial” documented in the following pages serves as a witness of the real suffering that Waugh and other Tradition-oriented Catholics experienced during those dismally dark days. As the timeless and priceless inheritance of the Church was being squandered by clueless modernists, the faithful clung to the Church with dogged and dogmatic determination. Now, after this dark night of the Church’s collective soul, we are beginning to see the restoration of the liturgy for which Waugh hoped and prayed

fire dancer
I am a fan of Mr. Waugh and I knew he wasn't happy with the new Mass (neither am I). It was fascinating reading the exchange between two brilliant, articulate men.

Bumand
A first hand account of some of the principles and consecuences of the liturgical reforms of vatican ii. Amazing how the clear and honest view of Waugh turned out to be profetic.

Cenneel
This is an excellent book comprised of letters from Evelyn Waugh to John Cardinal Heenan over the changes in the Catholic Liturgy following Vatican II and reveals the anguish of a devout Catholic convert over the changes in the Catholic Liturgy. The book also provides excellent insights in to the Traditional Liturgy now called the Extraordinary rite.

Scream_I LOVE YOU
I like Evelyn Waugh, but for his novels and his quick wit. This book shows another side of the man. The issues he discusses are as relevant as they were 50 years ago.

Zulkishicage
Got 15 books as a Christmas gift -all Evelyn Waugh. Trying to collect them all.. What can I say but a good read.

A factual and interesting discription of the condition of the Church following Vatican ll. It is for serious Catholics, A good read.

ISBN: 0316926442
ISBN13: 978-0316926447
language: English
ISBN: 0340165189
ISBN13: 978-0340165188
language: English
ISBN: 0141193522
ISBN13: 978-0141193526
language: English
Subcategory: Classics
ISBN: 0878750215
ISBN13: 978-0878750214
language: English
Subcategory: Writing Research and Publishing Guides
ISBN: 0297776576
ISBN13: 978-0297776574
language: English
Subcategory: Memoirs
e-Book The Letters of Evelyn Waugh download

The Letters of Evelyn Waugh epub fb2

by Mark Amory,Evelyn Waugh
ISBN: 1857992458
ISBN13: 978-1857992458
language: English
Subcategory: Memoirs
e-Book Handful of Dust download

Handful of Dust epub fb2

by Evelyn Waugh
ISBN: 1560549742
ISBN13: 978-1560549741
language: English
ISBN: 0316926345
ISBN13: 978-0316926348
language: English
Subcategory: Classics
ISBN: 0316926477
ISBN13: 978-0316926478
language: English
Subcategory: Travelers and Explorers
ISBN: 0773504079
ISBN13: 978-0773504073
language: English
Subcategory: History and Criticism