pbstudio
e-Book Living with Darwin: Evolution, Design, and the Future of Faith (Philosophy in Action) download

e-Book Living with Darwin: Evolution, Design, and the Future of Faith (Philosophy in Action) download

by Philip Kitcher

ISBN: 0195314441
ISBN13: 978-0195314441
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (January 5, 2007)
Pages: 208
Category: Theology
Subategory: Christian Books

ePub size: 1373 kb
Fb2 size: 1833 kb
DJVU size: 1388 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 875
Other Formats: azw mobi rtf lit

Philip Kitcher's Living with Darwin is one of the better discussions of the current battle between creationism and .

Philip Kitcher's Living with Darwin is one of the better discussions of the current battle between creationism and evolutionary theory. Much like the on-going feud about sexuality in Christian denominations, the n tussle is about much more than just the front line issues. But the "music of faith" (p. 158) is still something we yearn for. To fill that need, Kitcher recommends "spiritual" rather than supernatural religion, with the former being very much what John Dewey defended in his A Common Faith: an embrace of the religious experience without ascribing to it culturally fashioned notions of the supernatural. This is a commendable argument.

In Living With Darwin, Philip Kitcher stokes the flames swirling around Darwin's theory, sifting through the scientific evidence for evolution, Creation Science, and Intelligent Design, and revealing why evolution has been the object of such vehement attack. Kitcher first provides Charles Darwin has been at the center of white-hot public debate for more than a century. In Living With Darwin, Philip Kitcher stokes the flames swirling around Darwin's theory, sifting through the scientific evidence for evolution, Creation Science, and Intelligent Design, and revealing why evolution has.

In Living With Darwin, Philip Kitcher peers into the flames swirling around Darwin's theory, sifting through the scientific evidence for evolution, Creation Science, and Intelligent Design, and revealing why evolution has been th. .

In Living With Darwin, Philip Kitcher peers into the flames swirling around Darwin's theory, sifting through the scientific evidence for evolution, Creation Science, and Intelligent Design, and revealing why evolution has been the object of such vehement attack. Living with Darwin: Evolution, Design, and the Future of Faith. By John Dewey Professor of Philosophy Philip Kitcher, Philip Kitcher.

In this short, elegant book, Philip Kitcher distills the case for Darwinian evolutionary theory and its implications in a clear and forceful way. Kitcher shows how the alleged rivals to Darwinism, like Intelligent Design, are essentially scientifically bankrupt - and that scientific discoveries, including Darwin's, pose a genuine problem for religious faith, one that neither Darwin's opponents nor his militant defenders have satisfactorily resolved.

Phillip Kitcher’s Living with Darwinis a humane discussion of evangelical Christians’ dilemma in the aftermath . Kitcher argues that this fear is real and should be taken seriously by critics of creationism.

Phillip Kitcher’s Living with Darwinis a humane discussion of evangelical Christians’ dilemma in the aftermath of, first, the Enlightenment’s rational scrutiny of the supernaturalism on which Christianity is founded and, second, Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection and common descent.

Book Binding:Hardback. We appreciate the impact a good book can have. Philip Kitcher is the John Dewey Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University

Book Binding:Hardback. We all like the idea of saving a bit of cash, so when we found out how many good quality used books are out there - we just had to let you know! Read full description. Philip Kitcher is the John Dewey Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University. An eminent philosopher, he is the author of many books on science, literature, and music, including Abusing Science: The Case Against Creationism; The Lives to Come: The Genetic Revolution and Human Possibilities; Vaulting Ambition: Sociobiology and the Quest for Human Knowledge; Science, Truth, and Democracy; and In Mendel's Mirror.

Philosopher Philip Kitcher published one of the major critiques of young-earth creationism in 1982. 1 Now, 25 years later, he has returned to the subject with a small volume, Living with Darwin. The scientific focus is on Intelligent Design (ID) (not surprisingly), but the most important part of the book is Kitcher’s examination of evolution’s relationship to religion in a broader sense. From the start, Kitcher’s approach is different from the familiar Darwinian apologetics of the past several years.

Within philosophy, Kitcher is best known for his work in philosophy of biology, science, and mathematics. Living with Darwin: Evolution, Design, and the Future of Faith, Oxford University Press, January 2007. Outside academia for his work examining creationism and sociobiology. His works attempt to connect the questions raised in philosophy of biology and philosophy of mathematics with the central philosophical issues of epistemology, metaphysics, and ethics. Joyce's Kaleidoscope: An Invitation to Finnegans Wake, Oxford University Press, July 2007. Evolution is a dangerous idea.

Charles Darwin has been at the center of white-hot public debate for more than a century. In Living With Darwin, Philip Kitcher stokes the flames swirling around Darwin's theory, sifting through the scientific evidence for evolution, Creation Science, and Intelligent Design, and revealing why evolution has been the object of such vehement attack. Kitcher first provides valuable perspective on the present controversy, describing the many puzzles that blocked evolution's acceptance in the early years, and explaining how scientific research eventually found the answers to these conundrums. Interestingly, Kitcher shows that many of these early questions have been resurrected in recent years by proponents of Intelligent Design. In fact, Darwin himself considered the issue of intelligent design, and amassed a mountain of evidence that effectively refuted the idea. Kitcher argues that the problem with Intelligent Design isn't that it's "not science," as many critics say, but that it's "dead science," raising questions long resolved by scientists. But Kitcher points out that it is also important to recognize the cost of Darwin's success--the price of "life with Darwin." Darwinism has a profound effect on our understanding of our place in the universe, on our religious beliefs and aspirations. It is in truth the focal point of a larger clash between religious faith and modern science. Unless we can resolve this larger issue, the war over evolution will go on.
Comments:
Xcorn
Philip Kitcher is a philosopher not a biologist but in "Living with Darwin," he develops his capacity for studying a topic in depth, the only way of getting authority for contrasting faced visions. He has written a moral defense of Darwin by showing not only the weakness of the creationist and intelligent design supporters but also the importance of accepting Darwinism as a full reality which is also far of being an inconvenient truth.

As I said, Kitcher is a philosopher so is good in his field, discussing, contrasting, unveiling positions. For a reader like me, not a philosopher, the discussion is, in some passages (just a few), a little bit boring. To me, some topics didn't deserve to be touched at all, but this book is a battle field so any flank or wing or front is going to be disputed.

On the other hand, creationist and all that tribe are always looking for a gap in the theory. If they don't find it they can "create" it only as a sophist can do. So, in cases like this, we need someone like Kitcher to unmasking them.

If you believe that there's something wrong with saying that "'[e]volution is the root of atheism, of communism, Nazism, behaviorism, racism, economic imperialism, militarism, libertinism, anarchism, and all manner of anti-Christian system of belief and practice'" you should read "Living with Darwin."

Recommended.

Rollers from Abdun
Philip Kitcher's Living with Darwin is one of the better discussions of the current battle between creationism and evolutionary theory. Much like the on-going feud about sexuality in Christian denominations, the creationism/evolution tussle is about much more than just the front line issues. It involves a bona fide worldview clash between naturalists and supernaturalists.

To Kitcher's credit, he seems to recognize the narrow and comprehensive levels of the debate. He addresses the former in the first four chapters of this book. Arguing that creationism/ID has several varieties, he focuses on what he calls "Genesis creationism," which denies the ancient age of the earth; "novelty creationism," which claims that at least certain species are acts of special creation, thereby denying the one tree of life foundation of standard evolutionary theory; and "anti-selectionism," which argues that selection isn't a sufficient explanation for certain transitions, either from one species to the next in the development of "irreducibly complex" organs or organisms. Patiently and logically, these positions are addressed, respectively, in chapters 2-4.

What I found most intriguing in Kitcher's book is his effort in the final chapter to reflect on the more comprehensive worldview clash that fuels the more specific ones between ID and evolution. Kitcher argues that evolution destroys the possibility of divine design in the universe, and that textual analysis and comparative religion studies destroys faith in the literal truth of sacred scripture. Supernatural religion, then, is as dead as ID. But the "music of faith" (p. 158) is still something we yearn for. To fill that need, Kitcher recommends "spiritual" rather than supernatural religion, with the former being very much what John Dewey defended in his A Common Faith: an embrace of the religious experience without ascribing to it culturally fashioned notions of the supernatural.

This is a commendable argument. But it's one that leaves me dissatisfied for three reasons. First, it seems to me that Kitcher has illegitimately jumped from science to metaphysics--from a methodological naturalism, if you will, to a metaphysical one--in his conviction that evolution destroys the possibility of supernaturalism. Second, while it's absolutely the case that theology and God-belief needs to come to terms with (rather than denying) the Darwinian evolution, it's not at all clear that the only way to do that is by self-erasure. John Haught, for one, has worked on a consistent and sophisticated post-Darwinian theology. Finally, it's not clear to me that the human malaise which Kitcher thinks spiritual religion will ameliorate are just symptoms of social and economic injustice (which Kitcher believes). This account seems to me to ignore deeper questions of what might be called existential despair or loneliness with spiritual religion may simply not be equipped to deal with.

Thundershaper
This is a terrific essay. It covers the entire Darwin versus Intelligent Design issue with insight, comprehension, and clarity. He apportions time to all the central arguments on both sides without being distracted by obvious and tempting side arguments. Rarely does one book save a person from needing to read three or four. This is one of those books.

The author has thought long and hard about the issues and has written about it on previous occasions. Those projects have allowed him to hone the issues to the core and explore them fully.

Vudogal
At a time when it might appear there is no hope of reconciling the conflicting views of well-meaning secularists and the religious faithful, this book presents a well-balanced treatment of the subject of evolution and the often irrational-appearing arguments against it. In particular Professor Kitcher presents a very convincing case for considering Intelligent Design a "dead" science rather as opposed to simply dismissing it as "no science at all". But perhaps his greatest contribution in this slim volume is the case he makes for the secular community to recognize the legitimacy of spirituality for large segments of the population and for the religious faithful to recognize they have no need to feel threatened by the science of Darwin, or any science, for that matter. If you are interested in this debate and are looking for a clear-headed and fair treatment of the subject matter, this book is well worth the price.

ISBN: 0195384342
ISBN13: 978-0195384345
language: English
Subcategory: Theology
ISBN: 3860252410
ISBN13: 978-3860252413
language: German
Subcategory: Science and Mathematics
ISBN: 1108018270
ISBN13: 978-1108018272
language: English
Subcategory: Agricultural Sciences
ISBN: 0195161998
ISBN13: 978-0195161991
language: English
Subcategory: Humanities
ISBN: 1565076575
ISBN13: 978-1565076570
language: English
Subcategory: Humanities
e-Book The Autobiography of Charles Darwin download

The Autobiography of Charles Darwin epub fb2

by Charles Darwin,Francis Darwin
ISBN: 1907727043
ISBN13: 978-1907727047
language: English
Subcategory: Professionals and Academics
ISBN: 1429601450
ISBN13: 978-1429601450
language: English
Subcategory: Science Nature and How It Works
ISBN: 1596980974
ISBN13: 978-1596980976
language: English
Subcategory: Theology
ISBN: 0965148823
ISBN13: 978-0965148825
language: English
Subcategory: Literary
ISBN: 0743579275
ISBN13: 978-0743579278
language: English
Subcategory: Science and Mathematics