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e-Book God and Time: Four Views (Spectrum Multiview Book) download

e-Book God and Time: Four Views (Spectrum Multiview Book) download

by Gregory E. Ganssle,Paul Helm,Nicholas Wolterstorff,Alan G. Padgett

ISBN: 0830815511
ISBN13: 978-0830815517
Language: English
Publisher: IVP Academic (September 28, 2001)
Pages: 247
Category: Theology
Subategory: Christian Books

ePub size: 1683 kb
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Rating: 4.6
Votes: 498
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God & Time: Four Views Paperback – October 28, 2001

God & Time: Four Views Paperback – October 28, 2001. While the essays by Paul Helm, Alan G. Padgett, William Lane Craig and Nicholas Wolterstoff deliberate the question on a plane too high for total newcomers (who may need clarifications of terms such as "omnitemporality"), theology students will not want to miss this. Greg Ganssle (PhD, Syracuse) is professor of philosophy at Talbot School of Theology at Biola University.

William Lane Craig offers the timeleness and omnitemporality view while Nicholas Wolterstorff argues for God of time position. God & Time: Four Views (9780830815517) by Paul Helm, Alan G. Padgett, William Lane Craig, Nicholas Wolterstorff. Together these five scholars conduct readers on a stimulating and mind-stretching journey into one of the most controversial and challenging areas of theology today.

How we think of God and time has implications for our understanding of the nature of time, the creation of the universe, God's knowledge of the future, God's interaction with his creation and the fullness of God's life. In this book, four notable philosophers skillfully take on this difficult topic-all writing from within a Christian framework yet contending for different views.

The eternal God has created the universe. Alan G. Padgett maintains that God's eternity is more plausibly to be understood as relative timelessness. William Lane Craig presents a hybrid view that combines timelessness with omnitemporality.

12 ii Ganssle, Gregory . ed. God and Time: Four Views. The book’s contributors are highly distinguished theologians on the subject. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2001. Paul Helm is the author of Eternal God: A Study of God Without Time (1988); Alan G. Padgett wrote God, Eternity and the Nature of Time (1992); William Lane Craig produced both The Tensed Theory of Time and The Tenseless Theory of Time (2000); and Nicholas Wolterstorff authored God Everlasting in God and the Good (1975). The purpose of this multi-view book is to present a dialogue between contemporary perspectives on time within a Christian context.

Spectrum Multiview Books from IVP Academic offer a range of viewpoints on academic topics about which Christians clearly disagree. The unique format, pioneered by IVP in 1977 with the publication of The Meaning of the Millennium, gives proponents of major positions an opportunity to make their case. Each of the other contributors then offers a brief response. Books in the series range in topic from theology to science, from practical ministry to philosophy. What About Those Who Have Never Heard?

Gregory E. Ganssle - 2007 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.

Gregory E. Gregory E. Ganssle - 1995 - International Philosophical Quarterly 35 (2):217-218. Atemporality and the Mode of Divine Knowledge. Arvind Sharma, Philip H. Wiebe, Gregory E. Ganssle & Patrick Hutchings - 2006 - Sophia 45 (1):121-127. Using the Teaching Portfolio. Ganssle - 1995 - Teaching Philosophy 18 (4):351-357. Added to PP index 2009-01-28.

Nicholas Paul Wolterstorff (born 1932) is an American philosopher and a liturgical theologian. He is currently Noah Porter Professor Emeritus Philosophical Theology at Yale University. A prolific writer with wide-ranging philosophical and theological interests, he has written books on aesthetics, epistemology, political philosophy, philosophy of religion, metaphysics, and philosophy of education

God & Time : Four Views .

God & Time : Four Views. Gregory E Ganssle; Teaching Fellow Paul Helm; Alan G Padgett. The positions taken up here include divine timeless eternity, eternity as relative timelessness, timelessness and omnitemporality, and unqualified divine temporality.

Categories: Other Systematics. Pages: 228 Publisher: InterVarsity Press Published: 2001 ISBN-10: 0830826521 ISBN-13: 9780830826520. Find at a Library Find at Google Books. Systematic Theology Bible/Bibliology Doctrine of God/Theology y Sin/Harmartiology Jesus Christ/Christology Holy Spirit/Pneumatology y Angels and Demons/Angelology The Church/Ecclesiology End Times/Eschatology Israel/Israelology Rewards/Misthology Other Systematics.

The eternal God has created the universe. And that universe is time-bound. How can we best understand God's relationship with our time-bound universe? For example, does God experience each moment of time in succession or are all times present to God? How we think of God and time has implications for our understanding of the nature of time, the creation of the universe, God's knowledge of the future, God's interaction with his creation and the fullness of God's life. In this book, four notable philosophers skillfully take on this difficult topic--all writing from within a Christian framework yet contending for different views. Paul Helm argues that divine eternity should be construed as a state of absolute timelessness. Alan G. Padgett maintains that God's eternity is more plausibly to be understood as relative timelessness. William Lane Craig presents a hybrid view that combines timelessness with omnitemporality. And Nicholas Wolterstorff advocates a doctrine of unqualified divine temporality. Each essay is followed by responses from the other three contributors and a final counter-response from the original essayist, making for a lively exchange of ideas. Editor Gregory E. Ganssle provides a helpful introduction to the debate and its significance. Together these five scholars conduct readers on a stimulating and mind-stretching journey into one of the most controversial and challenging areas of theology today.
Comments:
saafari
It is extremely difficult to rate this book. It fills an important role in the discussion of the topic, but it is sometimes to esoteric. There are two aspects to the question. One is the nature of time; do the past and future have real existence as well as the present or do they not (B theory v. A theory respectively)? The other is the nature of God; is he in time, eternally timeless, or in some sense both? There are significant related questions involving such events as creation and the incarnation. Roughly stated the four views are that God is timelessly eternal, God is subject to time (but with no beginning or end), and two views that state that since creation God occupies time, but prior to that either he did not, or occupied a different sort of time.

First some of the good points:

The topic itself is interesting and in some ways important.

Each of the four views is followed by criticism by the other contributors, which is the followed by a rebuttal.
Each of the four views contains some of the history of thinking in this area including the views of such respected philosophical theologians as Augustine, Boethius, and Aquinas, as well as more modern thinkers.

The selected contributors seem to be capable of defending their views.

Not so good:

A lot of space is given to arcane arguments such as whether an eternal God can know “tensed facts”, such as what time it is. Tensed facts are statements the truth of which changes with time, e.g. “my hair is brown”, “it is raining”. Only a God who is in our time can know these things, so a timeless God’s knowledge is limited. This seems to me to make no sense, since an omniscient timeless God knows what is happening at all times, and also what time we occupy in our world when these statements are made. I would propose that though certain statements of fact are frequently expressed in tensed terms, the facts themselves are not tensed, and can be known in none tensed terms. “It rained yesterday” is the same fact as “on Aug 16, 2018 it is raining” (tenseless historical present). It is asserted that there are tensed statements that cannot be reduced to equivalent tenseless statements, but no example is even given, and I cannot think of one. If I say “yesterday it rained”, God knows that I make this statement on Aug 17 so that my “yesterday” at the time of statement is Aug 16. He also knows if it rains of Aug 16. He is missing no information, even though a timeless God has no “yesterday”. (If any reader can supply an example of a tensed fact, that cannot be made into a tenseless equivalent, I will reevaluate my opinion on this.)

Much time is spent on philosophical analysis and little on Biblical exegesis. I understand it is primarily a philosophical problem, but the exegetical evidence needs more exploration. Perhaps this would be the basis for another book.

The book is heavy on philosophical proofs of the various views, but much less on the practical consequences, or how they help us understand reality. String theory has led to the development of some elegant math, but interest has waned since it has never managed to come up with explanations of things. Similarly this book stimulates some sophisticated philosophical thinking, but how does it help us to understand our relationship to God? It would be a great benefit for the book to contain a closing summary of how the views may be helpful, or not so helpful in this regard.

Finally some general observations:

With questions like this precise and accurate answers are not possible. All views are necessarily approximations, so they must be evaluated less with regard to how rigorously true they are, and more on how useful they are in explaining reality. A possible analogy is the questions of whether light is composed of particles or waves. Viewing light as a particle is useful in predicting its behavior in some ways, but is misleading in others. The same is true for viewing light as a wave. The most useful physics must apply both appropriately. If this analogy is accurate, the least useful are the views that God is exclusively timelessly eternal, or that he is exclusively time bound. Of the two, since when we encounter God, we must do so in time, the view that he is time bound may be the more useful of the two. However, it is almost entirely anthropomorphic, and ignores the concept of transcendence. The views that see the question as more complex are probably more useful for understanding the broadest range of questions. The Biblical data seems to support that God is both transcendent and immanent. One must consider both, but in balance. The two “middle” views seem to be about equivalent in this regard. Though they view the ontological nature of God in the absence of creation differently, they generally will lead to the same conclusions.

Mikarr
Compared to many "Views" books on theological themes, this one has more theoretical/philosophical discussion and deals much less with Biblical evidence for the various views. That's because, as one of the authors, Paul Helm, admits, "the language of Scripture about God and time is not sufficiently precise so as to provide a definitive resolution of the issue one way or the other." Scriptures are mentioned by the authors at times, but mostly for the authors to claim that their theories are not CONTRADICTED by Scripture.

Unfortunately, many people are very dogmatic about the subject. If I understand correctly, one of the major reasons that Open Theism has been condemned by many as heresy is because Open Theism holds that God is temporal, existing in time. Then why would the defender of God's timelessness, Mr. Helm, admit that there isn't a "definitive resolution" in the language of Scripture? My personal opinion is that, since the Bible hasn't told us more clearly what God's relation to time is, that we should avoid accusations of "heresy" on the subject.

Please, tell me in a comment if you know of a time-focused but truly Biblically-evidenced argument, beyond what I can find in books on Open Theism such as Sanders' The God Who Risks or books on Calvinism such as Piper's The Pleasures of God.

I don't know how God experiences time. I don't think we need to know the answer to the question. If we really needed to know the answer, God would have given us more evidence in Scripture. Call me simple.

But, if you really feel you have to tackle the question, as far as I know this is probably as good a book as any.

Kupidon
"God and Time successfully presents the strengths and weaknesses of a very dense and complicated subject. Ultimately, each view contains multiple problems that rarely have satisfying answers. With Helm’s atemporal interpretation, the Christian must sacrifice God’s direct relation with humanity for a modified form of deism. Instead of personally intervening, God’s presence becomes a false representation of Himself to humanity. With Padgett, Craig, and Westerhoff’s temporal perspective, the Christian must sacrifice a strong view of divine providence and foreknowledge for a passive deity. God becomes completely reactive to the actions of His creatures. The book as a whole encourages intellectual maturity by familiarizing the reader with all the uncertainties about this topic. While some interpretations are more valid than others, the reader is able to grow from a dualistic thinking on the issue to a tentative commitment toward the best available theory. God and Time is recommended for anyone willing to understand the tension between differing Christian views."

For a complete and scholarly review of this book, please visit:

https://liberty.academia.edu/DarrenSlade/Book-Reviews

Arashilkis
THIS BOOK IS NOT FOR THE AVERAGE CHRISTIAN/PERSON. COMPLEX TERMS AND EQUATIONS AND MANY EXPLANATIONS THAT ARE WAY OVER PEOPLE'S HEADS. GOOD TOPIC AND DEBATE PRESENTED. PLEASE SEE SOME OF THE CONTENT BEFORE PURCHASING.

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