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e-Book We'Ve Had a Hundred Years of Psychotherapy and the World's Getting Worse download

e-Book We'Ve Had a Hundred Years of Psychotherapy and the World's Getting Worse download

by Michael Ventura,James Hillman

ISBN: 0062504096
ISBN13: 978-0062504098
Language: English
Publisher: Harpercollins; 1st edition (April 29, 1992)
Pages: 256
Category: Psychology and Counseling
Subategory: Diets and Fitness

ePub size: 1132 kb
Fb2 size: 1961 kb
DJVU size: 1635 kb
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 417
Other Formats: lrf lit azw doc

We've Had a Hundred Years. has been added to your Cart. In 1990, he interviewed Hillman, and the article generated abundant buzz. This inspired them to do a book: We've Had a Hundred Years of Psychotherapy - And the World's Getting Worse

We've Had a Hundred Years. This inspired them to do a book: We've Had a Hundred Years of Psychotherapy - And the World's Getting Worse. It's a scrapbook of interviews, conversations, and written correspondence, an informal jam session of passionate ideas. Their two minds soar and play, and the result is a stimulating duet.

The book has a three-part structure. The first section is in the form of a free-floating dialogue between Hillman and Ventura. The second section consists of lengthier essays written by the two authors to each other. The third section returns to the dialogue format of the first.

Mar 22, 2015 Richard Reese rated it it was amazing. The book consists mainly of letters between the authors, Michael Ventura and James Hillman. Ventura is a columnist for the . Weekly and a novelist; Hillman is a scholar, writer, and psychologist who has written numerous books, including Re-Visioning Psychology and Dreams and the Underworld. Hillman contends psychotherapy has caused a decline in the political sense of Americans by making intelligent people too passive and introspective.

James l renegade Jungian psychologist, the man Robert Bly has called "the most lively and original psychologist we've had in America since William James"-joins with Michael Ventura.

James l renegade Jungian psychologist, the man Robert Bly has called "the most lively and original psychologist we've had in America since William James"-joins with Michael columnist for the . Weekly-to shatter many of our current beliefs about our lives, the psyche, and society. Unrestrained, freewheeling, and brilliant, these two intellectual wild men take chances, break rules, and run red lights to strike at the very core of our shibboleths and perceptions. -Publisher description.

James Hillman & Michael Ventura

James Hillman & Michael Ventura. This furious, trenchant, and audacious series of interrelated dialogues and letters takes a searing look at not only the legacy of psychotherapy, but also practically every aspect of contemporary living-from sexuality to politics, media, the environment, and life in the city. James l renegade Jungian psychologist, the man Robert Bly has called "the most lively and original psychologist we've had in America since William James"-joins with Michael columnist for the .

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James l renegade Jungian psychologist, the man Robert Bly has called . The men are James Hillman and Michael Ventura. Their conversation has a theme: psychotherapy

James l renegade Jungian psychologist, the man Robert Bly has called "the most lively and original psychologist we've had in America since William James"-joins with Michael columnist for the . Hillman is in his midsixties, tall and slender. Their conversation has a theme: psychotherapy. And it has something like a form: each man is to push the other not to make more sense but to get further out in his thinking.

We?ve Had 100 Years of Psychotherapy & we're still weird? . In this ss assay of modern psychotherapy, James Hillman and Michael Ventura pull no punches in their thoughful and provacative conversations and letters.

We?ve Had 100 Years of Psychotherapy & we're still weird? Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 19 years ago. In this intense, incisive & barefaced series of dialogues & letters between two spirited people, we get searing insights into the legacy of psychotherapy & just about every aspect of contemporary life. The interplay of Ventura's relentless questioning and Hillman's ascerbic and, at times, seemingly heretical replies strip the clothes off the emperor of modern psychotherapy.

The book has a three-part structure

The book has a three-part structure. The first section is in the form of a free-floating dialog between Hillman and Ventura. The third section returns to the dialog format of the first. Encyclopedia Article. Psychotherapy, Psychiatry, Anti-psychiatry, Michel Foucault, Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson. Soteria (psychiatric treatment).

James Hillman Michael Ventura. Michael Ventura is an American novelist, screenwriter, film director, essayist and cultural critic. The book has a three-part structure. The first section is in the form of a free-floating dialog between Hillman and Ventura

James Hillman Michael Ventura.

A psychologist and a journalist explore the legacy of psychotherapy
Comments:
skriper
The Industrial Revolution blew the lid off Pandora's Box, releasing a poisonous whirlwind of evils into the world. Millions of rural people were herded into vast, filthy, disease-ridden cities to live among hordes of strangers, perform miserable work, and die young. It was pure hell, and many people snapped. Insane asylums began popping up like mushrooms, and the psychotherapy industry was born.

In Vienna, Freud kept busy treating hysterical Austrians, and Jung worked with "schizy" inmates at a Zürich asylum. They launched an insurgency against European Puritanism, a mindset that drove many out of their minds -- desire was bad, and punctual, robotic conformity to a system of pleasure-free maximum productivity was the compulsory objective.

So, the first wave of psychotherapy was radical and rebellious, but a second wave that emerged in the `50s has been regressive. The new mode purported that newborns were pure, innocent, blank slates. Once born, the beautiful, helpless "inner child" was vulnerable to abuse from others that could knock it off balance, sometimes permanently.

In the therapy room, attention was focused on the patient's past -- a hunt for abuse that may have happened decades ago. Mental illness was usually the result of a screwed up childhood, and it was believed to reside within the patient. The endless bombardment of dark influences from the surrounding insane society was off the radar. The goal of mainstream therapy was helping wounded patients adapt to living in an insane society. Mainstream therapists now practice everywhere in America.

James Hillman (1926-2011) was a student of Jung, and once served as the director of the C. G. Jung Institute. Over the years, he became a vocal critic of modern psychotherapy. In his opinion, newborns were not blank slates, and they were not born whole and perfect -- they were unique acorns with a calling and a destiny, tuned into the voices of their ancestors.

He thought that mainstream therapy was turning the educated middle class into docile plebes, trained to "cope (and not protest), to adapt (and not rebel) to... make it work for you (rather than refuse the unacceptable)." He strongly believed that the therapy room should become a cell of revolution. Patients needed to become involved in the insane world, and transform it into a healthier place for all life. Aim at the core of the problem, not the side effects.

Michael Ventura (born 1945) was a popular journalist for the trendy L.A. Weekly. He had abundant experience as a consumer of therapy. Mental illness was a significant theme in his family history. Most of the people he knew were either in therapy, practicing therapists, or both. At the same time, he saw that most marriages and relationships around him were dysfunctional to varying degrees. How could this be, at the zenith of human progress?

In 1990, he interviewed Hillman, and the article generated abundant buzz. This inspired them to do a book: We've Had a Hundred Years of Psychotherapy -- And the World's Getting Worse. It's a scrapbook of interviews, conversations, and written correspondence, an informal jam session of passionate ideas. Their two minds soar and play, and the result is a stimulating duet. The book was published prior to the Prozac Revolution.

According the Jung, "individuation" was the ideal destination -- the lifelong process of becoming more and more who you are. (He also said: "The most terrifying thing is to know yourself.") Individuation involved throwing overboard the stuff that was not who you are. This shifted us from a realm of comfortable habits to unfamiliar territory, where growth was more likely to happen. When we strayed onto a path where we didn't belong, our inner life force sent us clear warning messages, "symptoms" (anxiety, depression, etc.). Hillman said, "Only the unconscious can save us: in your pathology is your salvation."

It's wacky to help people adjust to living in an insane society, to stifle their healthy resistance, and encourage their submission. Hillman denounced "therapeutic Puritanism," with its psychic numbing and sensual numbing. America had been anaesthetized by the Puritan mindset. "Just look at our land -- this continent's astonishing beauty -- and then look at what we immigrants, Bibles in hand, priests and preachers in tow, have done to it."

The authors linked the rise of mental illness to the rise of individualism and its shadows, alienation and oppression. For them, the psyche did not live inside the individual, the individual dwelled within the vast timeless collective psyche, like a fish in the ocean. In the good old days, life was tribal and communal. Spirituality embraced all sacred beings, animate and inanimate. Both feet were firmly planted in a stable sense of time and place. Life was rich with meaning, power, and beauty. Ventura suspected that "the quality of wholeness is not located in the individual but in a community that includes the environment."

Christianism blindsided the ancient balance with its new concept of individual salvation. Suddenly, the creator of the entire universe was paying around-the-clock attention to ME -- watching everything I did, continuously reading my mind, and remembering all of my errors.

Following Columbus, the disintegration of ancient balance went into warp drive. Europeans, their slaves, and the people they conquered were uprooted and scattered across the planet. The social glue of ancient cultures dissolved. "Nothing needed to be permanent anymore."

In the last hundred years, life has gone totally crazy. Our sense of time and place has vaporized. Ventura called it "the avalanche." We lived in an era of "simultaneous, massive changes on every level of life everywhere, that have built up unstoppable momentum as they speed us toward God knows where." Obviously, we're heading for disaster. "You can't negotiate with an avalanche. Nothing, nothing, nothing is going to stop the shipwreck of this civilization."

Understand that the world is not ending, just this pathological civilization. We should not regret its passing, but honor its death with song. The good news here is that "I" am not sick, my society is. The good news is that the sick society is busy dying, setting the stage for rebirth and renewal. Hillman: "Any major change requires a breakdown." The next century or two may be rough, but it won't last forever. "The only solution can come when the world is reanimated, when we recognize how alive everything is, and how desirable."

What should we do? In a nutshell, two things are essential. (1) We cannot move toward healing without the power of imagination. Imagination allows us to break out of ruts, overcome barriers, and see farther, with greater clarity. It strengthens our ability to envision a healthier future. (2) Individualism is a toxic ball and chain, and we need to leave it behind, in the rubble of the past. We must remember community living and rejoin the family of life.

Ventura said it like this: "You don't %@&# around. You don't waste your life trying to find a secure place in the avalanche, `cause their ain't no such animal. You do the work of the soul." He told his son, "If you wanted to volunteer for fascinating, dangerous, necessary work, this would be a great job to volunteer for -- trying to be a wide-awake human during a Dark Age and keeping alive what you think is beautiful and important."

Richard Adrian Reese
Author of What Is Sustainable

MisTereO
After reading this book it becomes a no-brainer to recognize how easily pharmaceutical enterprises have been able to take control; of and to direct the "direction" of our lives - be they infant, child, adolescent, adult or seniors; and this through the assistance of medical specialties. An important read.

Envias
Talking About Race: A Workbook About White People Fostering Racial Equality in Their LivesFunny, sharp, keen and ironic. Out in 1992. it speaks to racism, cultural exchanges, its wealth and down-side given white supremacies influence upon us which is designed to be costly to group dynamics camouflaged by the obsession with Self and childhood which often reinforces old wounds leaning one toward a perpetual state of over-indulgence for compensations-sake Plus an admission that the interior life is not quite up to par with the battle against capitalism while it acquiesces to the norms of excessive self-consciousness intentionally challenging the dynamics of the survival of the group as a whole. It reminds you of what family is NOT but once had been and more. Here is a joke from it: "How many psychiatrists does it take to change a light bulb?" "It takes only one, but the light bulb has to really want to change." Great 26 year old book. A gem, a prophecy, a document as to how we have gotten where we are today.

Shazel
Written years ago and still extremely relevant.

Геракл
This book is classic Hillman. Ventura speaks like a screenwriter, while Hillman is his usual cranky self.

Hillman brings his Jungian training to bear on America. Fluorescent lighting, bad architecture, not much

escapes Hillman's gaze. Many people wonder about these things, but Hillman has the confidence of being

a trained analyst to put down his thoughts.

Ventura himself is a Hillman in waiting, and sometimes the gentleman is a bit too open about his life.

In conclusion, I am not going to say that if more people in America studied Hillman it would be a better

place. This is because Hillman's ideas entered the upper class of America at least twenty five years ago.

Marinara
James Hilllman who died in 2011 at 85 was a friend, mentor and all around brilliant person. This book, written with Michael Ventura is not typical of Hillman but a wonderful place to start. I am so sorry he died. 1926-2013

LONUDOG
Wonderful book - excellent service. Thank you!

This was not what I was expecting. Reading it felt cumbersome. I was hoping for something different.

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