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e-Book Tomo: Friendship through Fiction: An Anthology of Japan Teen Stories download

e-Book Tomo: Friendship through Fiction: An Anthology of Japan Teen Stories download

by Holly Thompson

ISBN: 1611720060
ISBN13: 978-1611720068
Language: English
Publisher: Stone Bridge Press (March 6, 2012)
Pages: 384
Category: Geography and Cultures
Subategory: For Kids

ePub size: 1883 kb
Fb2 size: 1803 kb
DJVU size: 1999 kb
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 828
Other Formats: rtf azw lrf mobi

Holly Thompson (ww. atbooks. com) is a longtime resident of Japan and author of the young adult verse novel Orchards (Delacorte/Random House, 2011), which was nominated for a 2012 YALSA/ALA Best Fiction for Young Adults award

Holly Thompson (ww. com) is a longtime resident of Japan and author of the young adult verse novel Orchards (Delacorte/Random House, 2011), which was nominated for a 2012 YALSA/ALA Best Fiction for Young Adults award. She is also the author of the picture book The Wakame Gatherers (Shen’s Books, 2007) and the novel Ash (Stone Bridge Press, 2001). She is a regular contributor to the Double Take column of All Nippon Airway’s Wingspan magazine, and serves as Regional Advisor for the Tokyo chapter of the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators.

Tomo: Friendship Through Fiction-An Anthology of Japan Teen .

Tomo: Friendship Through Fiction-An Anthology of Japan Teen Stories. See this Tomo Anthology update post. ly/2SvtUwi The short stories (36 of them! including 10 in translation) that authors contributed to Tomo continue to make possible donations to benefit teens in areas of Tohoku impacted by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

Start by marking Tomo: Friendship through Fiction: An Anthology of. .I picked up this book because I thought it was an anthology about March 11, 2011 (earthquake and tsunami) written by foreign authors wh.

Start by marking Tomo: Friendship through Fiction: An Anthology of Japan Teen Stories as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. I picked up this book because I thought it was an anthology about March 11, 2011 (earthquake and tsunami) written by foreign authors who had some stakes in Japan.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

One year after the tsunami, this benefit fiction anthology helps teens learn about Japan and contribute to long-term relief efforts. Holly Thompson (ww. com) is a longtime resident of Japan and author of the young adult verse novel Orchards (Delacorte/Random House, 2011), the picture book The Wakame Gatherers (Shen’s Books, 2007), and the novel Ash (Stone Bridge Press, 2001).

Mobile version (beta). Tomo- Friendship through Fiction- An Anthology of Japan Teen Stories. Download (epub, . 2 Mb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF.

Tomo: Friendship through Fiction: An Anthology of Japan Teen Stories. Berkeley, CA: Stone Bridge Press, 2012. I should mention a few personal connections.

book by Holly Thompson.

Thompson describes in her moving forward to the book how she was determined to put together a work that would give support to teens who were affected or displaced from the tragic events of the great Tohoku Earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011. They are grouped in seven themed sections which include "Shocks and Aftershocks" "Friends and Enemies" "Powers and Feats" and "Families and Connections".

"A broadly appealing mix of the tragic and droll, comforting, disturbing, exotic and universal" - Kirkus Reviews"Offers a unique and wide-ranging taste of Japanese life" - Booklist"The collection is extremely varied, featuring urban and rural settings, contemporary situations and timeless folk tales, humor, and adventure... Numerous stories involve mixed-race parents and children, affording good insights into cultural assimilation. Tomo is an excellent story collection, presenting a rich and varied immersion in Japanese culture from a teen perspective." - VOYA"Published on the one-year anniversary of the Japanese tsunami and earthquake, this collection of short stories and poems about Japanese teens is weird and wonderful, studded with the unique color of Japanese teen pop culture, as well as the impact of defining events from the twenty-first century to the present: Pearl Harbor, Hiroshima, the tsunami, earthquake and nuclear disaster." - Barnes & Noble Review"Thirty-six stories by writers somehow connected to Japan, five contributors with ties to Tohoku — each piece concisely aligns the disparate puzzle of the teenage map...Tomo reverberates with the authentic voice of Japanese and bicultural teens as they face down the confusing adult world before and after 3/11." - The Japan Times"From Pasmo travel cards to Harajuku girls to face-offs between a Kendo club and a dance group at the school gym, Japan is placed vividly in the reader’s heart and mind. And that heart would have to be made of the proverbial stone not to feel for the people affected by the earthquake. But Tomo inspires more than sympathy—it ignites us to empathy." - The Asian Review of Books"The thirty-six stories of Tomo: Friendship Through Fiction—An Anthology of Japan Teen Stories cover a wide range of genres (prose, verse, graphic narratives) and feature nine stories translated from the Japanese...most of the authors, many of whom write for adults, will be new to American teens." - The Horn BookThis aptly named fiction anthology—tomo means “friend” in Japanese—is a true labor of friendship to benefit teens in Japan whose lives were upended by the violent earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011. Authors from Japan and around the world have contributed works of fiction set in or related to Japan. Young adult English-language readers will be able to connect with their Japanese counterparts through stories of contemporary Japanese teens, ninja and yokai teens, folklore teens, mixed-heritage teens, and non-Japanese teens who call Japan home. Tales of friendship, mystery, love, ghosts, magic, science fiction, and history will propel readers to Japan past and present and to Japanese universes abroad.Portions of the proceeds of Tomo will be donated to the Japanese non-profit, HOPE FOR TOMORROW, to support ongoing relief efforts for teens in Japan.Edited and with a foreword by Holly Thompson, Tomo contributing authors include Naoko Awa, Deni Bechard, Jennifer Fumiko Cahill, Liza Dalby, Megumi Fujino, Andrew Fukuda, Alan Gratz, Katrina Toshiko Grigg-Saito, Suzanne Kamata, Sachiko Kashiwaba, Kelly Luce, Shogo Oketani and Leza Lowitz, Ryusuke Saito, Graham Salisbury, Fumio Takano, and Wendy Tokunaga, among others.Holly Thompson is a longtime writing teacher and resident of Japan and author of the young adult verse novel Orchards, which won the 2012 Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association Award for Young Adult Literature . She serves as the regional advisor for the Tokyo chapter of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators.
Comments:
DART-SKRIMER
Editor Holly Thompson and Stone Bridge Press pulled this collection of mostly original stories and translations together in less than a year, in time for the anniversary of the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, but there is nothing slapdash about it. This is a book that will endure.

Thirty-six writers (plus 10 translators) contributed a dazzling variety of stories featuring ninja, scientists, baseball players, yokai (spirits), pop stars, Little-Bo-Beep-look-alike Harajuku girls, and ordinary kids. Interestingly, a lot of writers chose to write across gender.

It's impossible for me to choose a favorite, or even favorites, but I especially enjoyed Andrew Fukuda's "Lost," about an amnesiac girl post-earthquake; "Aftershocks" by Ann Slater, about the reverberations of the 3/11 disasters in a bicultural family in Tokyo; "Kodama," an illustrated story in notebook form by Debbie Ridpath Ohi; and "Fleecy Clouds" by Arie Nashiya. But ask me tomorrow, and I might name different stories. I enjoyed every single one.

The proceeds of this book will benefit teens in northeastern Japan who survived the earthquake and tsunami.

Goldenfang
Hats off to Holly Thompson for conceiving the idea and then implementing it in this wonderful anthology. Great stories. I hope that it will be a huge success for the young people affected by the quake and tsunami in Tohoku. Congratulations! Tenki Davis

Tomo: Friendship through Fiction: An Anthology of Japan Teen Stories

Phenade
This project, based a collection of young adult short stories, verse, and graphic stories, is very ambitious. It brings together well-known writers with those who are just starting out, and proceeds are benefiting the Japanese NPO, Hope for Tomorrow, which helps young entrepreneurs in Tohoku. The word tomo means friend in Japanese.

This book spans basically all the major genres of Japanese literature - from ninjas to ghosts to verse to blog posts and everything in between. You would think that a book that does that would be either academic and huge or completely haphazard. But somehow editor Holly Thompson has managed to put together a book that is not only very current but also unified despite the different styles. The threads of hope and bonds (kizuna) weave through the stories and the varying characters, tying them together without any repetition.

This is a young adult book, so naturally the pitter patter of young love is a constant theme and is described adeptly by Thersa Matsuura in The Zodiac Tree and Sarah Ogawa in One. The superstitions of Japan are illuminated well in The Ghost Who Came To Breakfast from Alan Gratz and Yamada-san's Toaster by Kelly Luce. Relationships between teens and their parents are convincingly portrayed in House of Trust by Sachiko Kashiwaba (translated by Avery Fischer Udagawa) and I Hate Harajuku Girls by Katrina Toshiko Grigg-Saito. Somehow, Debbie Ohi is able to pull in all of these elements in her handwritten (graphic?) story, Kodama, and it is extremely accessible due to the format (sketchbook entry).

I love historical fiction so The Bridge to Lillooet from Trevor Kew, about young people in internment camps in WW2 Canada playing baseballe with local Mounties, has whet my appetite for more, as did supernatural mystery Staring at the Haiku, about antique dolls who confound young ghostbloggers, from John Paul Catton.

The writers are good at introducing other parts of Japanese literature into English as well. Louise George Kittaka shows the cheesy puns beloved of old Japanese men and television producers all over this country. Science-fiction story Anton and Kiyohime by Fumio Takano and translated by Hart Larrabee incorporates an exciting nagauta. Mariko Nagai's poem uses the onomatopeia Japanese verse is most famous for as well as being a joy to read out. Also, I was thrilled to read my first Ainu story, transcribed by Yukie Chiri and translated by Deborah Davidson.

Thompson chose to place the disaster-related stories at the beginning of the book and I really appreciate this decision. There is no white-washing of the enormity of this event, but the message I got was that the youth of Japan are going to move beyond it. This collection of stories leaves the reader with an amazing sense of hope for the future of Japan.

It's nigh on impossible trying to pick the best of this great bunch. This is not only a great book commemorating the spirit of the Tohoku people, it is a darn good read, and the English book I would recommend first to anyone who wants to dip their toes into Japanese literature.

Zetadda
Tomo is a charity anthology (in the wake of the recent tsunami) that brings together a wide range of voices writing about young people related to Japan in some way. Japanese, ex-pat, male, female, young, old, professional and amateur; the authors of this anthology represent a varied array of experiences with disasters, youth, and Japan.

Holly Thompson, whom I know from the fabulous children's book, "Wakame Gatherers" (which never fails to make me cry when I read it) edited the anthology.

It's well worth reading. There are "slice of life" stories along with stories of the fantastic, folktales. classics (Kenji Miyazawa), manga, and poetry.

You won't get bored.

The story opens with Andrew Fukuda's "Lost", about a girl awakening after a disaster who has lost her memory and must start over.

But it is the last stories of the anthology (in the section titled "Families and Connections") that resonated with me the most. (No surprise as I am married to a Tokyo boy and have two bicultural/biracial daughters forming their own identities in the US).

"The Law of Gravity" by Yuko Katakawa and translated by Deborah Iwabuchi features the voice of a young Japanese man, Kai, who is questioning the "perfect son" role he has played all his life for his parents; who all but ignore his little sister, Maika. It is Maika who ends up giving Kai a reason for continuing, and it is in their relationship that I find a bitter hope; parents can never really know the life of their children, but siblings can sometimes be the greatest support to eachother.

"Paper Lanterns" by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill uses the conceit of a dead friend who accompanies a haafu (biracial) girl to visit her grandparents in Japan to be the voice of the "clueless foreigner." The snarky voice of the dead friend clashing with the half-exasperated, half-embarassed voice of Mina as she explains funerary customs brings to light the complicated ways we deal with grief.

"I Hate Harajuku Girls" by Katrina Toshiko Grigg-Saito is a tale of another biracial girl, for the first time in Japan confronting in reality the place her beloved father had only shown her in tales. She attempts to come to terms with fer father's death by finding a certain shrine he loved, and instead confronts some stereotypes.

"Peace on Earth" features Taiga, a biracial son of an American mother and Japanese father living in Tokyo after the earthquake and tsunami. While the world around them begins to recover from disaster, Taiga's family also deals with upsets and differences. This story really hit home for me; especially the descriptions of the sacrifices each parent makes for the other's country, as well as the mundane things such as blueberry pancakes vs. Miso soup and rice for breakfast!

This Book's Snack Rating: a smorgasbord of voice, styles, and genres all flowing together into a thoughtful feast on youth, disaster, and Japan.

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