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e-Book How to Ditch Your Fairy download

e-Book How to Ditch Your Fairy download

by Justine Larbalestier

ISBN: 1599903792
ISBN13: 978-1599903798
Language: English
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA Childrens; Reprint edition (October 1, 2009)
Pages: 336
Category: Science Fiction and Fantasy
Subategory: For Kids

ePub size: 1463 kb
Fb2 size: 1986 kb
DJVU size: 1128 kb
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 624
Other Formats: azw lrf lrf azw

Then it became The Ultimate Fairy Book which I was rather fond of. Sadly though that title was too confusing, people .

Then it became The Ultimate Fairy Book which I was rather fond of. Sadly though that title was too confusing, people couldn’t be sure whether it was fiction or non-fiction. There folllowed much title despair before Libba Bray stepped in and named my book How To Ditch Your Fairy and all was well.

JUSTINE LARBALESTIER is the author of the award-winning Magic or Madness trilogy. One might think that "How to Ditch Your Fairy", set in a world of true racial equity and everyday magic, would be a social-justice obsessed fantasy geek's wet dream. But not so: Larbalestier's fairy-filled world of New Avalon is chock full of world-building elements and semi-memorable characters, but exists more as a treatment than as a great novel, and glazes superficially over miles of missed potential.

Justine Larbalestier. From the author of the award-winning Magic or Madness trilogy, How to Ditch Your Fairy is a delightful story of friendship, fairies, and figuring out how to make your own magic. Welcome to New Avalon, where everyone has a personal fairy. Though invisible to the naked eye, a personal fairy - like a specialized good luck charm - is vital to a person's success. It might determine whether you make a sports team, pass a class, or find that perfect outfit. She was tying on her tennis shoes. I do? I guess that must be because I feel bouncy. I didn’t think I’d stopped grinning since I first ran into Steffi. I didn’t think I’d stopped grinning since I first ran into Steffi the best fairy ever! So far it’s been the most astral morning of al time. Yay for you, Heather Sandol said, walking past me with her tennis bag over her shoulder. You know Freedom? My boyfriend?. I have a boyfriend, I said

If you lived in a world where everyone had a personal fairy, what kind would you want? . Tired of being treated like a personal parking pass, Charlie devises a plan to ditch her fairy for a more useful model.

If you lived in a world where everyone had a personal fairy, what kind would you want? A clothes-shopping fairy (The perfect outfit will always be on sale!)A loose-change fairy (Pretty self-explanatory. A fairy (You can get away with anything. Unfortunately for Charlie, she's stuck with a parking fairy-if she's in the car, the driver will find the perfect parking spot.

Justine Larbalestier has collected 11 key stories-many of them not easily found . This book is dedicated to an anonymous member of Spain's Secret Police

This book is dedicated to an anonymous member of Spain's Secret Police Change Your Thinking, Change Your Life: How to Unlock Your. 15 MB·31,776 Downloads. Change Your Thinking, Change Your Life. thoughts and get great results? Maxwell Maltz, Claude Change. You Are a Badass: How to Stop Doubting Your Greatness and Start Living an Awesome Life. 32 MB·280,995 Downloads.

Author: Justine Larbalestier. Genre: Young Adult Novel. A clothes-shopping fairy? A loose-change fairy? A fairy? Unfortunately for Charlie, she's stuck witha parking fairy - if she's in the car, the driver will find the perfect parking spot. 。。。 Yeaup! I actually read this. At first, teaming up with her archenemy (who has an u fairy) seems like a good idea.

Larbalestier's repetitive use of creative slang will be familiar to those who enjoyed Louise Rennison's Confessions of Georgia Nicolson (2000, et. Fans of Larbalestier's award-winning Magic or Madness trilogy (2005, et. might be put off initially by the glib tone, but this comic coming-of-age novel will entertain teen readers. demerits and suspensions, "List of Known Fairies Justine Thinks You Should Know," glossary) (Fantasy.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and . You got your demerits trying to get rid of your fairy!" I sucked my teeth at her objections. Anyway, Ro, you never do anything bad.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. How to Ditch Your Fairy isn’t set in Australia or the United States of America but in an imaginary country, perhaps a little in the future, that might be an amalgam of the two. Like both those countries, it has an East Coast and a West Coast and there are islands too. But no one eats apple pie or Vegemite sandwiches and they play cricket as well as baseball.

I loved Justine Larbalestier's fairy twist in this book. So what's a girl to do when she wants to ditch her fairy? She becomes friend with another girl who wants the same thing, and the two conspire to switch. A personal fairy? Umm, cool! But I probably would have something lame like Never-being-late fairy. Highlights: Justine's writing kept me entertained on all levels (fun, romance, fights). Her novel was fun, fresh,bubbly, and totally doos. Plus, the glossary in the back is definitely a major help when it comes to the words she invented. But is one fairy really any better than another?

If you lived in a world where everyone had a personal fairy, what kind would you want?

A clothes-shopping fairy (The perfect outfit will always be on sale!)A loose-change fairy (Pretty self-explanatory.)A never-getting-caught fairy (You can get away with anything. . . .)

Unfortunately for Charlie, she's stuck with a parking fairy-if she's in the car, the driver will find the perfect parking spot. Tired of being treated like a personal parking pass, Charlie devises a plan to ditch her fairy for a more useful model. At first, teaming up with her archenemy (who has an all-the-boys-like-you fairy) seems like a good idea. But Charlie soon learns there are consequences for messing with fairies-and she will have to resort to extraordinary measures to set things right again.

Comments:
Jarortr
New Avalon is a completely unique city that I just fell in love with. Although most of what we see about New Avalon is the high school for sports, we do get a good peek into some other parts of the city. I certainly liked the characters, but I was utterly fascinated with New Avalon itself.

Sports High was very interesting in its own right, too. The kids who choose to go to Sports High agree to abide by a very complex and rigid set of rules, as a condition of joining the school. The list of infractions is pages long, and it would be nearly impossible to avoid committing infractions. There are a few "unforgivable" infractions which deserve immediate and severe punishment (even as much as expulsion), but most infractions are minor, piddly stuff, and will earn you one demerit. If you earn enough demerits, you have to sit out of a game (which is, I'm sure, a huge disappointment for a sports-loving kid); and if you earn too very many demerits, they start talking explusion. Luckily, you can work off your demerits by doing community service projects.

The reason I found this particular bit so fascinating is because the kids LOVE it. I would absolutely hate a system like that. I mean, yes, I was always a law-abiding teen who got good grades, but I never found the school rules arbitrary or unreasonable. Sports High felt very much like the kids were conscripted into the army - but the army of sports, not the army of a nation's defense. At one point, Charlie says, "Sports are all about rules. You can't play sports if you can't follow the rules." I thought that was a very interesting point. It's all about discipline - even if it does seem to go too far.

One of the ways in which the rules went too far (in my personal opinion) was the rule about kissing. Students at Sports High may not kiss - at all. I don't mean that they may not kiss on campus, which would make sense to me in an environment where they strive for order. I mean that they may not kiss anybody, anywhere, at any time. Yeah. Like, if a guy kisses you goodnight on your doorstep, and somebody tells on you (or you're unlucky enough to get seen by a teacher), you're expelled, because kissing is an unforgivable infraction. Seriously.

The kids were monitored 24/7, even outside of school. Obviously, the school keeps tabs on the food they eat. They're given measured portions in school, and they have to weigh and report whatever they eat outside of school, too. That makes perfect sense, as athletes in training. But it doesn't stop with the food. The school also notes when they log on and off the computer, what time they did their homework and how long it took, etc etc.

I think the reason I found that so fascinating is because it felt like an Orwellian nightmare decorated with balloons and gum balls. These kids were happy under all that. Not just proud of getting into a very competitive school that will probably lead to a great career, but genuinely happy to be there and living that life today.

But anyway, all that leads me to a major inconsistency in the book that I found very troubling. Maybe I'm just obsessing on tiny details, I don't know - because, really, it is a tiny detail. With all that monitoring, the school knows how much sleep you get (or at least, how long you've been logged out at night, PRESUMABLY sleeping). And yet, despite the list that's miles long, failing to get enough sleep isn't an infraction. Now, every serious athlete in training that I have ever known has put great emphasis on the importance of getting enough sleep. Sleep is vital to an athlete, and this is a school of athletes. So, logically, since they regulate everything else, shouldn't they be regulating getting sufficient sleep, too?

That detail made the whole system seem totally arbitrary - almost like the writer made it up as she went along - for plot convenience.

Charlie should have earned demerits for failure to get enough sleep. Which, of course, would have forced her to work MORE community service hours... which would probably cut into her sleep again.

Oh well. Other than that, the story held together very well. It contains a mix of things that make perfect sense and things that don't. For example, it doesn't make any sense to me why an athlete would need to study PR; most hire an agent for that. But it's totally believable that some administrator somewhere thought it would be a good idea to teach athletes PR anyway.

What really sells New Avalon is the lingo. So many science fiction and fantasy writers put either bland lingo-free speech or contemporary lingo into the mouths of their characters. You might not notice it, but it makes the place feel a bit fake. New Avalon feel like a rich place because people talk like they live in an exotic place with exotic language idiosyncrasies.

However, the lingo does create a problem getting into the book in the beginning. It opens with girls talking about breasts - except you don't know that. They appear to be talking about some strange word you've never heard. You have to turn the page before the context makes it clear that they're just using some new word for something women have had since the dawn of time. I think that could have been done better. Luckily, the author does a better job with introducing the rest of the slang; with the exception of "teeth sucking", which is never explained at all and remains a pointless mystery to the end, the author introduces the rest of the rich New Avalon slang in such a way that you know exactly what it means immediately.

After the faltering start, it takes a bit to really get into the book. I can imagine that a lot of people give up before they get sucked in. I suggest you hang in there; by chapter 3, you won't be able to put the book down. Or, well, at least, I couldn't.

I agree with other reviewers that many of the supporting characters were not well-developed. I would have liked to get to know them better.

But Charlie herself was very alive and very real. We not only see the world through her eyes, but we get to know her rather intimately.

Although I babbled on and on about the school and the society, I also really liked the handling of the fairies. While some of the fairies mentioned are pretty silly, the basic concept is quite brilliant. What if everyone had one special ability, which just happens to be granted by an invisible fairy?

All in all, I would highly recommend this book to anybody. This book is for all ages. It strongly appealed to me, and I am an adult who recently attended her 20-year high school reunion. It should also appeal to teens, the intended audience. In fact, I think any pre-teen or child who has the skills to read at this level would enjoy it.

I would have no trouble at all letting a teen read this book. It encourages kids to be smart and think because it contains quite a lot to think about. It poses some interesting questions about rules, authority, fairness, honor, and personal responsibility. It is sure to incite some creativity, too, as anyone who reads this book is sure to start imagining what fairy he or she would get.

Fog
One might think that "How to Ditch Your Fairy", set in a world of true racial equity and everyday magic, would be a social-justice obsessed fantasy geek's wet dream. But not so: Larbalestier's fairy-filled world of New Avalon is chock full of world-building elements and semi-memorable characters, but exists more as a treatment than as a great novel, and glazes superficially over miles of missed potential. Almost half-way through the book, I found myself wondering when the action would begin (it never did) and found myself waiting on characters and story elements to be expounded upon (they never were). Even the central conflict of the novel seems pithy and torpid, leaving readers grasping at loose-ends that the author never ties up. The entire book reads as an extended introduction to a much more in-depth, interesting story that never manifests, resulting in a novel that is well-written but ultimately quite droll.

Ffrlel
I guess every YA book I read from now on will be compared to Harry Potter, and most will fall far short. Which is not fair to this book, but I was expecting something more than I got. It's cute, and I enjoyed reading it, but that's about it. If you want a quick, fun YA read, this is as good a book as any.

Flarik
From page one I was captivated with the idea of these different fairies and their odd powers; perfect parking spots, amazing clothes and deals, perfect hair and amazing sport feats. It was all very quirky. I found myself totally immersed in this whole other fantastical world. I couldn't put the book down and completed it within the day, taking time to savor and reread different parts when I was done (something I rarely do). The plot was sincere for the characters, and fun watching them figure it out. The only thing I didn't care for was the made up words. This is something the author's husband frequently does and pulls off in his work, but I feel she failed when attempting the same. Doos does not equal cool to me. Certain words were okay but doos definitly annoyed me the most. That said, the book was brilliant enough to make up for that which is why I still gave it 5 stars. I hope there are more fairy books where this came from!

Felhann
A book for kids. I stuck with it to the end and the ending was rather a let down. Not sure I would read this author again.
Children in the age range of 8-12 may really like it, especially, the girls

Gindian
thanks my daughter love this product thank you. i will recommend this to anyone as always amazon comes through great

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