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e-Book PORTRAITS OF CONFLICT: A Photographic History of Tennessee in the Civil War download

e-Book PORTRAITS OF CONFLICT: A Photographic History of Tennessee in the Civil War download

by Richard B. McCaslin

ISBN: 1557288313
ISBN13: 978-1557288318
Language: English
Publisher: University of Arkansas Press; First Edition edition (June 1, 2007)
Pages: 430
Category: Americas
Subategory: History

ePub size: 1253 kb
Fb2 size: 1494 kb
DJVU size: 1296 kb
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 565
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McCaslin presents more than 250 portraits of Civil War soldiers ranging from the lowliest .

McCaslin presents more than 250 portraits of Civil War soldiers ranging from the lowliest privates to the generals. Most are Tennesseans, but the book also includes out-of-staters, both Northerners and Southerners, who left their mark there, or shed their life's blood on Tennessee soil. The Portraits of Conflict books make for terrific browsing, and the Tennessee volume is certainly no exception. As the reader turns the pages, and reads one profile to the next, he has no idea what fate has in store for the next soldier, with the randomness of that fate on full display.

The Civil War presented the first major opportunity to photograph fighting men and the places they fought and to create an extensive visual record of wa.

The Civil War presented the first major opportunity to photograph fighting men and the places they fought and to create an extensive visual record of war. Most collections of such photographs, however, have focused on the leaders of the conflict and have treated the images only as illustrations for traditional narratives. Centering on the common solider, Portraits of Conflict: A Photographic History of South Carolina in the Civil War, tells the story of the individuals - their heroism and fear, the boredom and the misery they experienced.

Itas one thing to understand that over twenty-thousand Confederate and Union soldiers died at the Battle of Murfreesboro. Private Crosthwaitas image is one of more than 250 portraitsamany never before publishedato be found in the much anticipated Portraits of Conflict: A Photographic History of Tennessee in the Civil War. The eighth in the distinguished Portraits of Conflict series, this volume joins the personal and the public to provide a uniquely rich portrayal of Tennesseansain uniforms both blue and grayawho fought and lost their lives in the Civil War.

A Photographic History of Tennessee in the Civil War. by Richard B. McCaslin. It's quite another to study an ambrotype portrait of twenty-year-old private Frank B. Crosthwait, dressed in his Sunday best, looking somberly at the camera

A Photographic History of Tennessee in the Civil War.

Richard B.

Students of Civil War photography will appreciate this book, as well those with a more specialized interest in Alabama's people and their wa. - -Civil War Books and Authors. Praise for the Portraits of Conflict Series: "The Portraits of Conflict books make for terrific browsin. s the reader turns the pages, and reads one profile to the next, he has no idea what fate has in store for the next soldier, with the randomness of that fate on full display. -H-Net "A major contribution and welcome addition to Civil War history.

McCaslin, Richard B. Portraits of Conflict: A Photographic History of Tennessee in the Civil Wa. Who Was Who in the Civil War. New York: Facts On File, 1988. Portraits of Conflict: A Photographic History of Tennessee in the Civil War. Fayetteville, Ar. University of Arkansas Press, 2007, p. 4. ISBN 978-0-8160-1055-4.

The photographic history of the Civil War . Yet, it can be sensed that the conflict was any longer. As in being over and done with, only the aftermath has left.

The photographic history of the Civil War : thousands of scenes photographed 1861-65. Please go there and scroll through the entire book. The photographic history of the Civil War : thousands of scenes photographed 1861-65, with text by many special authorities. First I would like to start with this gem. Abe Lincoln and his top secret service man (to Abe's right) and his top general, to his left. Most likely it was a war, and it appears that this war had nothing to do with the Civil War narrative.

McCaslin, Richard . ed. Portraits of Conflict: A Photographic History of Tennessee in the Civil War (2006). Follow day-by-day events during Tennessee's Civil War sesquicentennial (2011-2015). The Battle of Franklin, November 30, 1864 (extensive site). National Park Service map showing Civil War Sites in Tennessee. The McGavock Confederate Cemetery at Franklin.

These disturbing Civil War photos, and the shocking facts that accompany them, will help you understand .

These disturbing Civil War photos, and the shocking facts that accompany them, will help you understand how it was the bloodiest conflict in American military history. CIVIL WAR~Photo Print of A Very Young Confederate Soldier. After so many were killed,in 1863 the Confederacy was taking on boys as young as in their Many were conscripted against their will, except those who could pay to avoid being a soldier. Definitely not the carbine.

It’s one thing to understand that over twenty-thousand Confederate and Union soldiers died at the Battle of Murfreesboro. It’s quite another to study an ambrotype portrait of twenty-year-old private Frank B. Crosthwait, dressed in his Sunday best, looking somberly at the camera. In a tragically short time, he’ll be found on the battlefield, mortally wounded, still clutching the knotted pieces of handkerchief he used in a hopeless attempt to stop the bleeding from his injuries.Private Crosthwait’s image is one of more than 250 portraits—many never before published—to be found in the much anticipated Portraits of Conflict: A Photographic History of Tennessee in the Civil War. The eighth in the distinguished Portraits of Conflict series, this volume joins the personal and the public to provide a uniquely rich portrayal of Tennesseans—in uniforms both blue and gray—who fought and lost their lives in the Civil War.Here is the story of a widow working as a Union spy to support herself and her children. Of a father emerging from his house to find his Confederate soldier son dying at his feet. Of a nine-year-old boy who attached himself to a Union regiment after his mother died. Their stories and faces, joined with personal remembrances from recovered letters and diaries and ample historical information on secession, famous battles, surrender, and Reconstruction, make this new Portraits of Conflict a Civil War treasure.
Comments:
Wohald
Those interested in Civil War images are quite familiar with the "Confederate Faces" volumes. They are a great source for seeing a lot of Confederate images in one place, but if you are like me, they leave you with a great big empty spot, wondering the history behind those peering eyes. Well, the "Portraits of Conflicts" state series, and author McCaslin's authorship on this volume in particular, has resolved this issue nicely. The pictures are a nice variety and in ample numbers, with the history of each man included. McCaslin has done a fine job of research and editing of the history of each soldier, as well as weaving them into the history and battles of the Civil War in Tennessee. The definitive history of Tennessee in the Civil War it is not, nor was intended to be, but a visual feast with fascinating vignettes that take you through Tennessee's war, it is. A large book with a fine printing job and crisp pictures, it is well worth the issue price, unlike so many you see these days, and Amazon's discount makes it a very nice value for your money. You might want to check out McCaslin's North Carolina volume in this series as well, I know that I will.

BoberMod
This coffeetable book contains 280 portraits of soldiers from Tennessee during the Civil War. Tennesseans ralled to both sides, joining armies from the North and the South, which invaded out state. Words are important, but everyone knows the old cliche about a picture. The three distinct parts of this state were represented by William G. Cannon from Pulaski in Middle Tennessee, January 1859 with an office in the old post office building on the public square. In East Tennessee, G. W. Weeks of Greenville in September 1851; and in Jonesborough in 1854. West Tennessee had W. T. Brooks of Bolivar among others.

The pictures were copied from tintypes popular in 1856 and cartes des visite which had four photos on one card in 1866. Those were still around in Knoxville in the 1950s. Some Battles in our state included Shiloh, Chicamauga, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Straw Plains and Lookout Mountain. This book is a collection which silently convey a moving perspective on Tennnesseans Civil War experience.

A few of my favorites with a bit of history: Sam Davis, the boy spy, is my number one. From Smyrna, he was in Coleman's Scouts in 1863 after seeing action across the state for two years. In six years he'd be dead and was the first Tennessean to be chosen for the Confederate Medal of Honor. He was caught in a field in Minor Hill and taken to Pulaski's jail on the Square. Refusing to identify the source of the info he was carrying (Shaw, his superior also was incarcerated in the Giles County jail), he subsequently was hanged on November 17, 1863. A museum with his name was erected on the hill where he was executed. A stone Statue showing him as a young boy is still at the Southern edge of the courthouse property. In 1909, a bronze statue was erected on the SE corner of the state capital in Nashville.

Others include George W. Gordon of Pulaski is reputedly one of the founders of the klan. Born in 1836 in Giles County, he worked his way to brigadiei general during the battle in Atlanta (see 'Gone With the Wind'). Wounded at Murfreesboro, fought at Chicamauga, Missionary Ridge and Franklin. He was an attorney in Pulaski and Memphis for twenty years and became Tennessee's railroad commissioner in 1883.

John C. Brown, the first ex-Confederate to be governor of Tennessee, became Major General after the Battle of Atlanta. He also fought at Fort Doneldson, Perryville, Franklin and Chicamauga. After the war, he practiced law in Pulaski and was prominent in the klan. His home still stands on West Madison, now a part of Martin Methodist College, my alma mater.

Nathan Bedford Forrest of Chapel Hill, Tennessee, the Grand Wizard: enlisted in 1861 and became major general in 1864; lieutenant general in February, 1865, the only man in the war to rise from private to that rank. He was born in Chapel Hill and settled in Memphis, TN after the War. He is associated with reincarnation of the klan in 1869 and the disbanding of same.

William M. Forrest, only son of NBF, enlisted as private (just like his dad) at age 15 and attended his father in every battle. He was wounded at Spring Hill in November 1864. William "blended" the cool courage and active service of his father with the modesty and gentleness of his refined and beautiful mother." She spent as much time as she could near her husband's headquarters to watch over her son.

John B. Kennedy of Pulaski suggested the name and devises the latter form the Greek word for "circle." Born in Pulaski, he was one of the six founders of klan and posed with the flag which draped his coffin.

Parson Brownlow, a notorious mayor of Knoxville, went on to become Governor. He had enemies who tried to downplay his actions and intelligence, like I do with some folks who don't know what they are doing on something which is none of their business in this game of reviewing (do they get paid?) Do they know anything about what they criticize? They need to be denied access to other people's reviews.

The photo of Ryan Linn atop the Umbrella Rock at Lookout Mountain in 1875 was dramatic. It was similar to one in Harper's Ferry, West Virginia. The best known Unionist from Tennessee was David Farragut, for whom that town was named, born July, 1801, near Knoxville and relocated to New Orleans in 1806. He was adopted in 1808 after his mother died by David Porter. He became America's first rear admiral in August 1862. His legacy was "Damn the Torpedoes," a typical Knoxville attitude. Tigers every one.

Itiannta
Sadly, I was unfamiliar with the works of Richard McCaslin when he contacted me about using my great grandfather's image and war record in this latest book. Since our first contact, I have been impressed by the author's attention to photographic detail and the scope of his knowledge of the War Between the States. My family has long had Captain George Moore's war record, but by recounting it within the context of the entire Tennessee conflict, Richard McCaslin has brought my great grandfathers service out of the pages of the War Department and made it a living and breathing thing. The entire book reads this way and whether you are a student of history or not, prepare to be transported by word and by the eyes of his subjects, into another era and into the greatest conflict a nation can endure. I will be transporting myself back in time with McCaslin's other works as soon as possible.

Matty
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