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e-Book The Terracotta Army download

e-Book The Terracotta Army download

by John Man

ISBN: 0593059298
ISBN13: 978-0593059296
Language: English
Publisher: Bantam Press; 1St Edition edition (September 3, 2007)
Pages: 304
Category: Asia
Subategory: History

ePub size: 1977 kb
Fb2 size: 1666 kb
DJVU size: 1164 kb
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 547
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The Terracotta Army is a collection of terracotta sculptures depicting the armies of Qin Shi Huang, the first Emperor of China.

The Terracotta Army is a collection of terracotta sculptures depicting the armies of Qin Shi Huang, the first Emperor of China. It is a form of funerary art buried with the emperor in 210–209 BCE with the purpose of protecting the emperor in his afterlife. The figures, dating from approximately the late third century BCE, were discovered in 1974 by local farmers in Lintong County, outside Xi'an, Shaanxi, China.

The Terracotta Army is one of the greatest, and most famous, archaeological discoveries of all time. John Man doesn't just tell the reader what happened or what might have happened.

Zhao, as Man recounts in his book The Terracotta Army, had personally been subject to a "self-criticism" session .

Zhao, as Man recounts in his book The Terracotta Army, had personally been subject to a "self-criticism" session in the late 1960s, as a person "involved with old things". So now although the worst excesses of that period were over, Zhao was worried what might become of the statues. As the work continued, the extraordinary scale of what the First Emperor - a ruthless man who defeated six warring states to unite China under an imperial system that continued until 1912 - had commissioned became clear.

The Terracotta Army is one of the greatest, and most famous, archaeological discoveries of all time

The Terracotta Army is one of the greatest, and most famous, archaeological discoveries of all time.

The Terracotta Army book. I enjoyed reading John Man's The Terracotta Army. John has a great style of writing, he manages to mix the current People's republic of China back to the ancient times of the first emperor.

The Terracotta Army is one of the greatest, and most famous, archaeological discoveries of all time.

The Terracotta Army (Paperback). Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers. The Terracotta Army is one of the greatest, and most famous, archaeological discoveries of all time.

Terracotta Warriors Tickets Booking. Who found the Terracotta Army? One can hardly believe the fact that such important royal burial pits were accidently discovered by a group of famers, not archeologists. Terracotta Army Facts. After the excavation, this grand underground military troop came to light again

The Terracotta Army seems to have achieved that goal.

The Terracotta Army seems to have achieved that goal.

The Terracotta Army is one of the greatest, and most famous, archaeological discoveries of all time. 8,099 life-size figures of warriors and horses were interred in the Mausoleum of the First Emperor of China - each is individually carved, and they are thought to represent real members of the emperor's army. This is the remarkable story of their creation, the man who ordered them made, their rediscovery and their continuing legacy as a pre-eminent symbol of Chinese greatness. The First Emperor, Qin Shi Huang, was king of the Chinese state of Qin and the first man to unite China into a single empire. He built the first Great Wall and brought a single written script to the whole country. He was an inspired and ruthless ruler, but one also beset by paranoia and a desire for immortality. He is still considered the founding father of the modern state of China. On his death in 210 BC he was buried in a giant mausoleum near modern-day Xi'an. Legends of the treasures contained therein still tantalize the imagination today. In 1974, local farmers digging a well for water broke through into the burial mound and found the first of the Terracotta warriors. Further excavations have revealed the full splendour of the buried army. But the majority of the mausoleum is yet to be opened, including the burial chamber itself - myth tells us that amongst the treasures yet to be uncovered is a vast map of the First Emperor's kingdom with rivers marked with channels of flowing mercury. The story of the First Emperor and the Terracotta Army is a fascinating one, not least for the discoveries yet to be made.
Comments:
mym Ђудęm ęгσ НuK
Despite its title, this book is supposed to be as much about the First Qin Emperor, the first one to unify China, as it is about the Terracotta Army of warriors that were buried alongside his tomb.

Although I did not like it as much as I perhaps should have, this book, the first that I have read from John Man, has some obvious qualities. It has most of the ingredients to appeal to a large audience. It is easy to read and very accessible. It presents in an engaging way an interesting and little known (in the West, at least) piece of history. It mixes the archaeology of the site and the history of its finding and excavation with the history of the one who ordered this clay army to be built. All this is told in a very anecdotal way, with the author gratifying us with looks at times as a tourist guide and at times as his personal travel diary.

Although I am no fan of this kind of work, I did find that it worked rather well overall, even if, at times, the author's tone tended to be mildly patronising, quite self-satisfied, and therefore also somewhat annoying. But maybe that was just me and my personal preferences, because the author also made some excellent points.

One of these is to show throughout the book to what extent our main source for the life and deeds of the First Emperor was biased. He may therefore have exaggerated, distorting the record and exaggerated the horrors committed under his orders. Here, however, there is a bit of a tension or even a contradiction, and I would agree with another reviewer that the author's comparisons with 20th century totalitarian dictators are rather "unhelpful references", as he puts it so nicely. They are simply and totally anachronistic and of the kind made by these authors which tend to "dumb down" the content to make sure that their "lay audience" gets the point that they are making. However, he also mentions the Emperor as a divine figure above the law so that the "First Emperor" (he was not quite the first in fact) was more of a theocratic and increasingly paranoid tyrant rather than some kind of Orwellian totalitarian dictator of more modern times.

A close look at the book shows however that it is more of a collection of semi-legendary anecdotes rather than a real biography of the First Emperor. I was for instance disappointed to learn just about nothing about how the six remaining competing kingdoms were conquered, and why this happened so quickly, within a mere decade. Although the author seems to hint a couple of times to the Qin's military superiority, there is no explanation of this, neither is there any mention of what could have made this possible. A related flaw is that there is also next to nothing about the multiple far-retching unifying reforms that took place under his reign. They are mentioned and showed to be important, and that is about it. Finally, the author has very little to say about the structure of China's society at the time and how it changed. He barely mentions in passing that it was feudal, without really explaining what is meant by this rather vague term, and that the Emperor, through his reforms, broke this system and centralised as much powers in his hands as he could. There is simply nothing about the impact of these wrenching changes on the economy of China.

As a result, the book is good on the Terracotta Army, the reasons for burying it and how it was built and buried and while it is also good in "telling the story" of its "discovery" and its excavation. It also shows that these excavations have essentially responded to ideological and rather nationalistic agendas that had little to do with the wish to preserve history.

It is however much less good and in fact very patchy when presenting the context of the Terracotta Army. Contrary to what I was hoping for, it does not really present the "Life and Times of the First Emperor" so that the book's subtitle ("China's First Emperor and the Birth of a Nation") is somewhat misleading. Moreover, once you strip away the author's travel expériences and chats with the various people he came across (and fror which I cared very little!), there is not very much that remains and what does remain is largely superficial. Three stars, although this might be generous.

Ieregr
This is an excellent account of a) the origins of the army,the unification of China and the buildtng of the Great Wall.
b) the digging of the burial tomb,the making of yhe clay soldiers and the death of the first emperor in 206BC and c)the discovery of the army in 1976,the extent of tourism and what is to be discovered.
An excellent text with extensive pictures. A definative statement on the terracotta army.
Highly recommended.

Ffleg
I confess that I knew very little about the terracotta soldiers until I read The Terracotta Army. They were just an impressive array of workmanship uncovered somewhere in China. I had gone to see a couple of them on display at the Melbourne Town Hall years ago. I was impressed, but admittedly a little more impressed that that's where The Beatles waved to swarming streets of screaming teenagers in an earlier time.

John Man brings them as much to life as is possible in a book. Alternating between the present and the past, in a style of writing that wouldn't be amiss in a historical movie, with frequent flash-backs. He seems to have a strong sense of both visual and haptic presence. Olfactory as well, as you scent the packed earth of the pits, and the fine clays brought to the terracotta factory. The photographic colour plates are stunning, and he took many photos that didn't make it into the book. And there were touching moments when he felt some of the objects themselves.

John Man doesn't just tell the reader what happened or what might have happened. He takes the reader through some interesting thought experiments, based on available manufacturing techniques of the times, materials, availability of workmen in sufficient numbers, and the intriguing manufacturing techniques of a modern maker of terracotta soldiers not far from the originals. The numbers and scenarios are of course estimates and probabilities. But following through his thinking processes makes it dead interesting.

He cites a few times the works of Joseph Needham which reminds me of another wonderful work of history Bomb, Book and Compass: Joseph Needham and the Great Secrets of China. by Simon Winchester which I heartily recommend.

I spent a month in China last October, and did only a brief tour of major attractions such as The Great Wall. John Man's works (and I'll be reading his The Great Wall: The Extraordinary Story of China's Wonder of the World when I can) turn tourist attractions into pilgrimages into the past, and also into the future as he describes some of the plans for further excavations and what archeologists might find.

As I was walking up the very steep inclines of The Great Wall, I wondered what it would have been like as a soldier back then. I'm looking forward to finding out.

Brightfury
I have thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. (just finished it today) I have collected several coffee table/visual books on this subject over many years....Without a doubt, the topic is compelling and fascinating. But I was overdue to really LEARN about this amazing archaeological and cultural phenomenon; and this book delivered on all levels. As previous reviewers have rightfully mentioned, the author keeps the topic fresh, fascinating, easy-to-comprehend-and-savor, and we wind up with a wallop of insight and information. For anyone who is looking for an overview of the topic, written in an accessible and enjoyable style -- this is it. I guarantee you will finish the book feeling informed and curious to actually SEE the Terra Cotta Army. This author should get a commission from the Chinese Tourism Bureau. I trust many readers are blowing their credit card balance, as they head to the airport.
I was very tempted! Well-done.

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