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e-Book Foundation: The History of England from Its Earliest Beginnings to the Tudors download

e-Book Foundation: The History of England from Its Earliest Beginnings to the Tudors download

by Peter Ackroyd

ISBN: 125000361X
ISBN13: 978-1250003614
Language: English
Publisher: Thomas Dunne Books; Reprint edition (October 16, 2012)
Pages: 496
Category: Europe
Subategory: History

ePub size: 1396 kb
Fb2 size: 1107 kb
DJVU size: 1152 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 206
Other Formats: mbr mobi lrf lit

An extraordinary book. Peter Ackroyd is arguably the most talented and prolific writer working in Britain today. Ackroyd paints a portrait of early England that is both historically rich and compellingly human.

An extraordinary book. is a natural storyteller and a passionate historian, but his true skill lies in his acute eye for revealing interesting details.

He guides us from the Peter Ackroyd, whose work has always been underpinned by a profound interest in and understanding of England's history, now tells the epic story of England itself. Mar 31, 2015 Jayson rated it liked it. Shelves: ory, era-medieval, 400-499-pp, genre-history, era-ancient, author-british, format-nonfiction, read-in-2015.

Электронная книга "Foundation: The History of England from Its Earliest Beginnings to the Tudors", Peter Ackroyd. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Foundation: The History of England from Its Earliest Beginnings to the Tudors" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Shelve Foundation: The History of England from Its Earliest Beginnings to the Tudors. Tudors: The History of England from Henry VIII to Elizabeth I. by Peter Ackroyd. Rich in detail and atmosphere and told in vivid.

In Foundation, the chronicler of London and of its river, the Thames, takes us from the primeval forests of England's prehistory to the death, in 1509, of the first Tudor king, Henry VII. He guides us from the building of Stonehenge to the founding of the two great glories of medieval England: common law and the cathedrals.

Peter Ackroyd, whose work has always been underpinned by a profound interest in and understanding of England's history, now tells the epic story of England itself. In Foundation,the chronicler of London and of its river, the Thames, takes us from the primeval forests of Englands prehistory to the death of the first Tudor king, Henry VII, in 1509. He guides us from the building of Stonehenge to the founding of the two great glories of medieval England: common law and the cathedrals

Peter Ackroyd, whose work has always been underpinned by a profound interest in and understanding of England's history, now tells the epic story of England itself. In Foundation, the chronicler of London and of its river, the Thames, take us from the primeval forests of England's prehistory to the death, in 1509, of the first Tudor king, Henry VII. He guides us from the building of Stonehenge to the founding of the two great glories of medieval England: common law and the cathedrals

Having written enthralling biographies of London and of its great river, the Thames, Peter Ackroyd now turns to. .

Having written enthralling biographies of London and of its great river, the Thames, Peter Ackroyd now turns to England itself

Peter Ackroyd, whose work has always been underpinned by a profound interest in and understanding of England’s history, now tells the epic story of England itself.

Peter Ackroyd, whose work has always been underpinned by a profound interest in and understanding of England’s history, now tells the epic story of England itself. In Foundation, the chronicler of London and of its river, the Thames, takes us from the primeval forests of England’s prehistory to the death, in 1509, of the first Tudor king, Henry VII. He guides us from the building of Stonehenge to the founding of the two great glories of medieval England: common law and the cathedrals

Peter Ackroyd, whose work has always been underpinned by a profound interest in and understanding of England's history, now tells the epic story of England itself.

In Foundation, the chronicler of London and of its river, the Thames, takes us from the primeval forests of England's prehistory to the death, in 1509, of the first Tudor king, Henry VII. He guides us from the building of Stonehenge to the founding of the two great glories of medieval England: common law and the cathedrals. He shows us glimpses of the country's most distant past--a Neolithic stirrup found in a grave, a Roman fort, a Saxon tomb, a medieval manor house--and describes in rich prose the successive waves of invaders who made England English, despite being themselves Roman, Viking, Saxon, or Norman French.

With his extraordinary skill for evoking time and place and his acute eye for the telling detail, Ackroyd recounts the story of warring kings, of civil strife, and foreign wars. But he also gives us a vivid sense of how England's early people lived: the homes they built, the clothes the wore, the food they ate, even the jokes they told. All are brought vividly to life in this history of England through the narrative mastery of one of Britain's finest writers.

Comments:
Saintrius
I am puzzled by the animosity displayed in some of the more condemnatory reviews of this book. Lack of footnotes, maps, genealogical charts, kings' lists? They couldn't detect these things before they read the book? The author evidently didn't intend this to be a weighty, scholarly tome, rather a readable, quite enjoyable survey of several thousand years of English history. If this was his intent, he was quite successful. He kept the narrative going quite smoothly without leaving any significant gaps. Actually, his technique of interspersing chapters on the doings of kings and noblemen with chapters on the lives of ordinary folk, kept the story from becoming ponderous, as is the work of so many other writers.

Perhaps he does sometimes draw firm conclusions in places where scholars argue otherwise, or where the jury is still out. Frankly, I don't care. I'm not looking for rock-solid detail, backed by endless footnotes and cross-references. If I were, I'd turn elsewhere. Instead, I was interested in finding a coherent narrative that would help knit together the bits and pieces of English history of which I had already read. "Foundation" is that narrative.

I'm looking forward to his work on the Tudors.

Agarus
I thought this was a fairly enjoyable survey of the history of England from prehistoric times through the reign of Henry VII. Ackroyd's alternation of chapters about the political and military history with chapters about culture, society, etc. is a kind of awkward structure, but at least he does manage to convey something of the history that's not merely the political.

Ackroyd's style is a bit eccentric, and it sometimes results in odd sentences and odd punctuation, but it's not dry.

I have one big complaint about the Kindle edition, which is what I read. When I got to the end, I saw that there was a list of illustrations/photos, but only a list--no illustrations or photos. There's absolutely no reason why the publisher couldn't include these in the ebook version (unless they are actually there and I just can't find them--which is just as bad). That's just inexcusable.

Xanzay
Having only taken history survey courses, I realized I couldn't tell one English monarch from another; so I bought Foundations. Ackroyd does an admirable job, starting with prehistory like Stonehenge and ending with Henry VII. Though he had a few themes he reiterated throughout the book, this is definitely not a textbook but rather a narrative. The chapters relating the necessarily chronological tale are interspersed with many short chapters about the lives of ordinary folk along with anecdotes and occasional passages from the letters of a man who represents the middleclass of the era. It's both entertaining and informative with suggestions for further reading as endnotes organized by chapter. There are three sections of illustrations, many quite colorful, along with an index at the end. Oddly, no maps of medieval England are included, nor are there many likenesses of the various kings. Ackroyd does include references to the literature of the day along with a few children's rhymes and their origins. Discussion of architecture and the design and construction of villages abound; the later part of Foundation depicts the rather bizarre history of Oxford and Cambridge as well as academic institutions at all levels. Overall, the reader gets a glimpse of life as it was like in the middle ages while learning fairly detailed accounts of each king in a wonderful format for those who don't want to take a class or read a textbook.

Grosho
It's not a bad book; don't get me wrong. But it isn't the easiest thing to slog through. Remember we are being given centuries (millennia in this first volume) of history. Remaining in focus is essential, but Ackroyd seems to spend a lot of time in digressions and tangents. Not bad in itself, but such digressions need to remain firmly tied to the points the author is trying to make. Plus, any survey of a long period in history vitally needs a spine, a framework that all of the anecdotes can hang on. The obvious one in this case is the various monarchs. Foes of "great man" history don't like long lists of kings and queens, but at least it provides a linear skeleton. Ackroyd pays occasional lip service to this but it would seem to need more emphasis on what changed from one reign to another.

The other thing that this sort of history needs is a good sense of how institutions morph over the years. There is some of this in Ackroyd's book, in bits and pieces. Sometimes the only analysis you get (on, say, village development) is in widely separated chunks, with little reference to what came before or after. Sometimes the discussion isn't even in the same temporal vicinity. By that I mean Anglo-Saxon development is often discussed only in the Plantagenet chapters. I'm not too bothered by the lack of complete footnotes, because this isn't that sort of history. But a general reader history like this should at least make it easier to follow the main threads in a more linear fashion. Recommended for those who can handle the scattershot approach - there are good anecdotes distributed in the somewhat confusing structure.

Shakanos
It's difficult for me to write a fair and fitting review of a history book; easier to review a novel since I'm not a historian. I will say that I enjoyed this book, found it very interesting (sometimes too interesting), learned a lot, and I'm very glad I read it. I have his second and third in the series, which I will read eventually, and have his next on order (Volume IV due October 10 this year). I plan to purchase his remaining two in the series, once they are written. The reason I mentioned that it was sometimes too interesting is that I decided to take notes. I found so much of interest that my notes became excessive. When I take notes while reading, I generally transcribe them later on the PC. In this case, I abandoned my notes halfway through and decided I should simply read the book again someday. Peter Ackroyd is an exceptional writer and one of my favorite authors.

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