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e-Book Tewkesbury 1471: The last Yorkist victory (Campaign) download

e-Book Tewkesbury 1471: The last Yorkist victory (Campaign) download

by Graham Turner,Christopher Gravett

ISBN: 1841765147
ISBN13: 978-1841765143
Language: English
Publisher: Osprey Publishing (October 22, 2003)
Pages: 96
Category: Europe
Subategory: History

ePub size: 1908 kb
Fb2 size: 1662 kb
DJVU size: 1119 kb
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 566
Other Formats: lit lrf mobi txt

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In this book Christopher Gravett details the climactic events of 1471 and the battle that virtually extinguished the Lancastrian cause. After the crushing Yorkist victory at Towton in 1461.

Illustrated by Graham Turner

Illustrated by Graham Turner. Osprey Publishing, Oxford, £1. 9. ISBN 1-84176-514-7 BOSWORTH 1485: Last Charge of the Plantagenets. Illustrated by Graham Turner. The book covers Edward IV’s campaign against the earl of Warwick and Margaret of Anjou in the momentous year 1471. The book begins with an Introduction discussing first of all the many contemporary sources for both battles.

Tewkesbury 1471 Osprey Campaign №131. Tewkesbury 1471 Книги Исторические Автор: . ravett Формат: pdf Издат. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read

Tewkesbury 1471 Osprey Campaign №131. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Book in the Osprey Campaign Series). by Graham Turner and Christopher Gravett.

Tewkesbury 1471 book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Tewkesbury 1471: The last Yorkist victory as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In this book Christopher Gravett details the climactic events of 1471 and.

Tewkesbury 1471: The Lasy Yorkist Victory - Osprey Campaign S. No. 131 (Paperback). Christopher Gravett (author), Graham Turner (illustrator). Following their victory at Towton in 1461, The House of York continued to triumph

Tewkesbury 1471: The Lasy Yorkist Victory - Osprey Campaign S. Following their victory at Towton in 1461, The House of York continued to triumph. By 1470, however, relations between Edward and his lieutenant, Eari of Warwick, had broken down and Warwick had joined the Lancastrian cause. On 14 April 1471 at Barnet, Edward defeated and killed Warwick. On the same day Henry VI's wife and son, Queen Margaret and Prince Edward, landed at Weymouth. Learning of the disaster, they united with Warwick's army and made a stand at Tewkesbury.

item 1 Tewkesbury 1471: The Last Yorkist Victory (Osprey Campaign) By Christopher Grav -Tewkesbury 1471 . Graham has been a freelance artist since 1984, specialising in historical and military subjects, particularly of the medieval period, and has illustrated numerous Osprey titles.

item 1 Tewkesbury 1471: The Last Yorkist Victory (Osprey Campaign) By Christopher Grav -Tewkesbury 1471: The Last Yorkist Victory (Osprey Campaign) By Christopher Grav. item 2 Tewkesbury 1471: The Last Yorkist Victory (Osprey Campaign),Christopher Gravett -Tewkesbury 1471: The Last Yorkist Victory (Osprey Campaign),Christopher Gravett. Country of Publication.

In this book Christopher Gravett details the climactic events of 1471 and the battle that virtually extinguished the Lancastrian cause. After the crushing Yorkist victory at Towton in 1461, King Edward IV appeared to have triumphed in England's bloody Wars of the Roses (1455-1485). The Lancastrian King Henry VI was even a prisoner in the Tower of London. By 1470, however, Edward's erstwhile ally the Earl of Warwick – The 'Kingmaker' – had joined the Lancastrians and a final reckoning was inevitable.

Christopher Gravett is an assistant curator of armour at the Tower . 2003) Tewkesbury 1471: The Last Yorkist Victory, Osprey Publishing

Christopher Gravett is an assistant curator of armour at the Tower Armouries specialising in the arms and armour of the medieval world. Gravett has written a number of books and acts as an advisor for film and television projects. 2003) Tewkesbury 1471: The Last Yorkist Victory, Osprey Publishing, ISBN 1-84176-514-7. 2003) Norman Stone Castles: British Isles 1066-1216, Osprey Publishing

In this book Christopher Gravett details the climactic events of 1471 and the battle that virtually extinguished the Lancastrian cause. After the crushing Yorkist victory at Towton in 1461, King Edward IV appeared to have triumphed in England's bloody Wars of the Roses (1455-1485). The Lancastrian King Henry VI was even a prisoner in the Tower of London. By 1470, however, Edward's erstwhile ally the Earl of Warwick – The 'Kingmaker' – had joined the Lancastrians and a final reckoning was inevitable. Warwick perished at Barnet in April 1471, and on 4 May Edward confronted his enemies, including Edward, Prince and last hope of the House of Lancaster, at Tewkesbury.
Comments:
Punind
This book covers probably the most interesting phase of the War of the Roses. I like almost all of this book.

Christopher Gravett's narrative shines in the campaigns of Barnet & Tewkesbury (and London), which the writing and paintings truly bring to life. Sometimes the Osprey format actually shines, and this is one of those moments. We get a concise but colorful examination of Oxford's charge in the mists, Somerset's banzai attack to silence Edward York's guns, and as an added bonus, the Bastard of Fauconburg's little known but colorful siege of London, a place where York and Neville clearly vied for the influence and sympathies of the mob. Beginning with intrigue and ending with heads on spikes, I found this story to be one of the most interesting medieval muddles I've ever had the pleasure to never live through.

I also like the introduction, which provides some essential background material. We see Edward IV of the House of York mismanage his triumphant victory over the Lancastrians. The action starts with Warwick Neville's treachery with Clarence, brother to the king. We see Warwick and Clarence join a rebellion, surprise a royal host at Edgecote, execute loyalist Yorkists, put King Edward under house arrest, and then fatally hesitate. It is their hesitation and inability to govern that seems to allow King Edward a second chance. Edgecote gained Warwick a captive king; Losecote gained Warwick an enemy.

But then Warwick flees to France, gains mercenaries, sails a fleet past a tepid blockade, and returns to triumph as a Lancastrian, no longer needing either Edward or Clarence. But when Edward flees to the Low Countries, gains mercenaries, sails a fleet past a tepid blockade, and returns in triumph to London, chaos ensues.

Christopher Gravett deserves a congratulations for clearly explaining the political motives behind seemingly obtuse political moves, such as why Warwick turned on Edward, why it seemed each faction could flee to Continental Europe and come back stronger, and why knights now fought in a non-Hollywood way: on foot in plate armor, wielding polearms instead of swords, using guns and archers, but still in hauberks as colorful as ever.

In earnest, this is not a perfect book. The format is still limited. Some topics are left unsaid that I think bear mention. One, more emphasis should have been laid on why the nobility of England are both slow to mobilize, and why England lacks a standing army against Continental hosts. Two, and many English enthusiasts seem unwilling to admit this, but I wish Gravett had truly explained that English armies of the 100 Year's War are now becoming outclassed by armies that use Continental tactics and the new Continental gunpowder technology.

But the weaknesses are well outweighed by the strengths, much like how King Edward's prowess as a warrior handily made up for his mistakes as a man. The victories in this book also seem climactic. If it were not for Richard III and the Tower Princes, it seems clear that York would still own England.

riki
A very well written account of two pivotal battles of the War of the Roses. Both Barnet and Tewkesbury are covered in this book, battles which saw the deaths of Richard Neville, the "Kingmaker" and Prince Edward of Westminster, bringing to an end Margaret of Anjou's fight to secure the English crown for her son and placing Edward IV securely on the throne.

The Sphinx of Driz
I have been very pleased with and impressed with the quality of Osprey publications. The Campaign series are focused on military campaigns from ancient times through the current era. I have found the books in the Osprey Campaign series to be a great source and frequently the only source for well-researched information on military campaigns especially in the ancient campaigns through early 20th century campaigns.

Bu
This Campaign title covers a three-month campaign during which Edward IV and the Yorkists managed to win two decisive victories and defeat their enemies separately. The first was the battle of Barnett which saw the defeat and death of the Nevilles, and of the Earl of Warwick and his brother Montagu specifically. The second dashed the last hope of Marguerite of Anjou and the death of her son and of the young Beaufort Duke of Somerset.

The booklet does a good job at presenting the opposing commanders and armies before dividing each battle into the marching phase and the battle itself. It also does a good job at describing the campaign and battles. What I found to be this title’s strongpoint, however, was to show that although the Yorkists may have had a more unified command and – perhaps – the better commander with Edward himself, they were also rather lucky in both instances, and perhaps particularly at Barnett.

The Nevilles and the Lancastrians also had some good commanders, with Montagu and Oxford holding more than their own at Barnett. However, as well shown in the booklet, Oxford, after his victory on the right flank only managed to rally a fraction of his men and was the victim of “friendly fire” because of the fog, while Montagu’s death seem to have led to a breakdown of the centre and a rout during which Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick (the “Kingmaker”) was killed when trying to escape from the battlefield.

Edward was also lucky before Barnett, during the early phase of the campaign during which the “Kingmaker” could have cornered him and destroyed his force rather than taking refuge within a walled city. He was also lucky during the Tewkesbury campaign. Despite being initially tricked, he managed to catch the Lancastrians just before they managed to cross the Severn, which they did not do so immediately because of the Duke of Somerset insistence to fight, and reach the Lancastrian forces that the Earl of Pembroke was busy raising in Wales. Here again, there was a mixture of skill and luck on the Yorkist side, and of rashness and lack of a unified command on the side of the Lancastrians.

Also included in this book are good discussions of the two battles, their sources and the various controversies that have opposed historians, especially with regards to the battle of Tewkesbury. Here again, the author manages to make the main points in a succinct but easy to follow way, presenting both sides and explaining why he believes that one of the proposed locations for the battle is more convincing than the other. Another interesting discussion is whether Somerset’s attach could have succeeded or even won the day if the Lancastrian centre had supported it, and where exactly did this attack take place. For reasons that are not entirely clear, especially since the sources are fully consistent, not only did the centre fail to provide support but it also broke up once Somerset’s attack failed. The Yorkist victory spelled the end for both Somerset and Edward Prince of Wales - or rather “Edward of Lancaster” as the Yorkists called him, since terming him Prince of Wales implied recognising him as the legitimate heir to the throne. It also led to the demise of Henry VI himself who was clearly murdered on Edward’s orders.

Finally, the title is very well supported by maps, diagrams for each of the two battles, photos of the battlefields and some rather superb plates. The biography, while perhaps a bit old since this title was first published in 2003, is good and still includes some of the main references on the period, and on the Wars of the Roses more particularly. Among a few other nice surprises, I found Paul Murray Kendall’s book on “Warwick the Kingmaker” which is one of my long time favourites.

Five stars for a very good Campaign title that delivered exactly what I was expecting from it.

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