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e-Book Church, State, and Society: An Introduction to Catholic Social Doctrine (Catholic Moral Thought) download

e-Book Church, State, and Society: An Introduction to Catholic Social Doctrine (Catholic Moral Thought) download

by J. Brian Benestad

ISBN: 0813218004
ISBN13: 978-0813218007
Language: English
Publisher: The Catholic University of America Press (February 18, 2011)
Pages: 500
Category: World
Subategory: History

ePub size: 1386 kb
Fb2 size: 1879 kb
DJVU size: 1816 kb
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 975
Other Formats: docx lrf mbr doc

How can the Catholic faith help not only Catholics, but all people, build a just and flourishing society? . Professor J. Brian Benestad, who teaches theology at the University of Scranton, has written a valuable book.

How can the Catholic faith help not only Catholics, but all people, build a just and flourishing society? The Catholic Church contributes first and foremost to the common good by forming the consciences of the faithful. Faith helps reason achieve a proper understanding of the common good and thereby guides what individuals need to do to live justly and harmoniously. Church, State, and Society is both companion to and expansion of the Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church.

Church, State, and Society book. J. Brian Benestad’s book is a wonderful introduction to Catholic Social Doctrine (CSD) because of his clarity and nuance

Church, State, and Society book. Brian Benestad’s book is a wonderful introduction to Catholic Social Doctrine (CSD) because of his clarity and nuance.

Book Description: Church, State, and Society explains the nuanced .

Book Description: Church, State, and Society explains the nuanced understanding of human dignity and the common good found in the Catholic intellectual tradition. eISBN: 978-0-8132-1923-3. C. S. Lewis provides us with an apt introduction to our reflection on the theme of human dignity in the comparison he makes between individuals and civilizations, noting that the former have an eternal destiny of happiness or misery, while the latter will one day perish. There are no ordinary people

How can the Catholic faith help not only Catholics, but all people, build a just and flourishing society? The Catholic . .No commitment, cancel anytime.

Catholic Moral Thought (Hardcover). Catholic Univ of Amer Pr. Book Format. Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H). 0 x . 0 Inches.

Book Essay: J. Brian Benestad, Church, State, and Society . Steven Brust - 2014 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 11 (1):263-271

Book Essay: J. Brian Benestad, Church, State, and Society: An Introduction to Catholic Social Doctrine. Steven Brust - 2014 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 11 (1):263-271. Church, State, and Society: An Introduction to Catholic Social Doctrine. Joseph W. Koterski - 2011 - International Philosophical Quarterly 51 (2):272-274. Brian Benestad - 2011 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 11 (3):596-597. Values in a Time of Upheaval, by Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger. Brian Benestad - 2006 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 6 (4):805-808. Aquinas, Aristotle, and the Promise of the Common Good, by Mary M. Keys.

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CORPUS CHRISTI, TX (Catholic Online) - J. Brian Benestad's Church, State, and Society: An Introduction to Catholic Social Doctrine (Catholic University of America Press, 2011), is a welcome addition to the growing corpus of books offering a corrective to an often skewed. Brian Benestad's Church, State, and Society: An Introduction to Catholic Social Doctrine (Catholic University of America Press, 2011), is a welcome addition to the growing corpus of books offering a corrective to an often skewed understanding of Catholic Social Doctrine. Dr. Benestad is Professor of Theology and Director of the Catholic Studies Program at the University of Scranton, and is a long-standing peritus on Catholic Social Doctrine. lt;< Previous Article. This document may be purchased. Purchase this article for.

The Catholic Church contributes first and foremost to the common good by forming the consciences of the faithful.

How can the Catholic faith help not only Catholics, but all people, build a just and flourishing society?

The Catholic Church contributes first and foremost to the common good by forming the consciences of the faithful. Faith helps reason achieve a proper understanding of the common good and thereby guides what individuals need to do to live justly and harmoniously. In this book, J. Brian Benestad provides a detailed and accessible introduction to Catholic social doctrine (CSD), the Church's teachings concerning the human person, the family, society, political life, charity, justice, and social justice.

Church, State, and Society explains the nuanced understanding of human dignity and the common good found in the Catholic intellectual tradition. It makes the case that liberal-arts education is an essential part of the common good because it helps people understand their dignity and all that justice requires. The author shows the influence of ancient and modern political philosophy on CSD philosophy and examines St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, papal social encyclicals, Vatican Council II, and postconciliar magisterial teaching. Benestad highlights the teachings of popes John Paul II and Benedict XVI that the attainment of the common good depends on the practice of the virtues by citizens and leaders alike.

The book is divided into four parts. The first treats key themes of social life: the dignity of the human person, human rights, natural law, and the common good. Part two focuses on the three principal mediating institutions of civil society: the family, the Church, and the Catholic university. Part three considers the economy, work, poverty, immigration, and the environment, while part four focuses on the international community and just war principles. The conclusion discusses tension between CSD and liberal democracy.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

J. Brian Benestad is professor of theology at the University of Scranton and the author of numerous book chapters and journal articles published on Catholic social doctrine. He is editor of Fellowship of Catholic Scholars Quarterly.

PRAISE FOR THE BOOK

"Professor Benestad treats complicated issues with subtlety and yet at the same time offers a broad and comprehensible introduction from which an interested reader, whether in the classroom or not, can profit wonderfully. . .Church, State, and Society is the best introduction to Catholic social doctrine I have encountered, and it is well worth the investment." --Nova et Vetera

"Against the backdrop of cacophonous disputes about the meaning and application of Catholic Social Doctrine, Brian Benestad has presented a magisterial work of considerable extent and admirable clarity. . . Benestad's book provides a great service to those trying to understand Catholic Social Doctrine. His erudition and his care in making key distinctions are essential to understand such a complex body of doctrine. He subtly charts a course through the minefields of contemporary arguments about Catholic Social Doctrine, getting to the theoretical source of these disagreements: the relation of Catholic Social Doctrine to both the Church's older tradition of political reflection and the new forms of political thought and practice that modernity originates. . . In short, Benestad's excellent volume is the best treatment of Catholic Social Doctrine as a whole and a precious reminder of the intrinsically problematic character of modern democracy." --Perspectives on Political Science

Comments:
Llbery
Very comprehensive and learned overview of Catholic social doctrine. The author's major concern is to make sure that the passionate development of individual virtue fed by personal faith commitment is essential to Catholic social action. The way I would put it: while you can't get social change simply from personal commitment, you can't get social change WITHOUT personal commitment. Importantly, Benestad's book offers very strong background on the conceptual foundations of Catholic social thought, especially human dignity and the common good.

Ylal
As someone who has been interested in Catholic social teaching for over 30 years I found this work to be of great interest. There has been a paucity of fresh material in recent years and Brian Benestad has gone a long way in bridging this gap. It covers the topic extensively and logically. His style is also very "reader friendly" especially for those who may not have a good background in the basis and relevance of Catholic social teaching to the modern world. I commend this work to anyone interested in the history, application and development of Catholic social teaching.

Rude
Great exposition of the subject with simple words and ideas that stick. I would definetely recommend this book to anyone who might want to deepen their knowledge of Church, state and politics.

JoJosho
This excellent book could go a long way to clearing up much confusion in this dark age. The author successfully weaves the tapestry of Catholic Social Doctrine using the appropriate threads of the Great encyclicals from wise Popes as well as the ancient wisdom of Aristotle and Aquinas amongst many others. Mother Church when clothed by those who would weave Her garment of the invisible threads of liberation theology borrowed from Marx, Darwin, Freud and all others interested in rebuilding the Tower of Babel in our lifetime, is shamefully ill clad.

Would that our clergy will pick up this exceptional exposition of the True intentions of Mother Church's social teaching as we try to follow Christ's two most important commandments, love God with all your heart, mind, strength and soul, and your neighbor as yourself. Dr. Benestad goes back to the 4 cardinal virtues and the 3 theological virtues. Sadly, access to a true understanding of these virtues has been obscured by modern thinking that encourages us to hold contradictory philosophies in our minds. Notions of justice have been so badly distorted in part by being reduced to a material dialectic that fulfills some deluded desire for lowest common denominator equality. Not until "Steadfast love and faithfulness will meet; righteousness and peace will kiss each other" (Ps. 85:14) will we have true justice and things in their proper order.

Fr. Schall write of the roots of "social justice" and explains that the term is redundant and irrelevant for those that know their history and that understand the virtue of justice. Justice is giving the other his due and is social in its roots. What is now called "social justice" is merely ideology rooted in worldly things, and as Dr. Benestad makes clear, Catholic Social Doctrine is rooted in the transcendent and its fruit is seen in this world.

Read and understand this admirable book and then read the key encyclicals. Clear the cant from your mind and this volume will help to clear up much confusion that this world would be happy for you to continue to propagate. For a clearer exposition of the 4 cardinal and 3 theological virtues that are a prerequisite for properly understanding Benestad's work, a wonderful resource would be Joseph Pieper's two books and these key virtues: The Four Cardinal Virtues and Faith, Hope and Love. This book is highly recommended!

Gavinrage
Professor J. Brian Benestad, who teaches theology at the University of Scranton, has written a valuable book. The book is valuable because it is encyclopedic, orthodox, and well researched. Church, State, and Society is both companion to and expansion of the Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church. Quite effectively, Professor Benestad examines Catholic Social Doctribe (CSD) by analyzing it in four sections: the human person, the political community, and the common good; the Church, the family, and the Catholic University (and liberal education); the universal destination of goods and private property; and the international community and just war. I read the book from its beginning through its appendix (an astute commentary about Pope Benedict's encyclical Caritas in Veritate), but some may wish to read and study only certain chapters. Benestad is, I think, at his best in defending authentic liberal education; his defense extended even to his expressed concern about (and fair criticism of) a certain priest's rather limited understanding of the college experience as "practical" (see chapter 8). Benestad insists, sensibly, upon college learning as necessarily concerned with what we might call the "great conversation," not only about making a living but also making a life.
The text is too rich for me, in this space, to comment on many details, but I see as the central theme of the book Professor Benestad's conviction that what matters above all is our discernment of, and then commitment to, the theological and cardinal virtues which, he tells us, his students so rarely understand, at least when they matriculate. The great social encyclicals of Popes Leo XIII, Pius XI, Pius XII, Blessed John XXIII, Blessed John Paul, and, now, Benedict XVI are examined thoughtfully--as are many classical sources (especially Aristotle and St. Thomas Aquinas). The book will be a treasure to those who teach CSD, to priests and deacons who want to continue their learning in this critical field so that their homilies may thereby be enriched, to all serious students of CSD, and, I hope, to non-Catholics who want to read a reliable study and summary of the principles of CSD. For example: Suppose there were a student who believed that the U.S. bishops' statement entitled "Faithful Citizenship" was a solid and substantial presentation of Catholic teaching in the area of church-state relations. It isn't (see p. 221), and the Vatican document "Doctrinal Note on Some Questions Regarding the Participation of Catholics in Public Life" is a necessary, if lesser known, remedy to the earlier defective piece. Benestad's Chapter 6 gives important details and perspective.
Professor Benestad does not mention Christina Hoff Sommers, but one of her articles perfectly captures the tone and temper of some of what Benestad is saying. Professor Sommers was once teaching a course on social ethics and contending that students--indeed all of us--must cultivate the personal virtues before we might expect institutional or systemic reform. Another section of the same course, taught by a colleague of Sommers's, emphasized overarching questions about corporations, or exploitation of developing states, or international business and political depredations, and she castigated Sommers about the emphasis on personal virtue in Sommers's section of the course. In the final examination in the course given by Sommers's colleague, the students cheated by plagiarizing. Sommers's colleague had the wit and grace to ask Professor Sommers for her course notes for use the next semester!
After listing a number of the virtues we need to be good people and, derivatively, good citizens, Peter, in his Second Letter, says that those who lack such virtues are blind (1:9). I suspect that Professor Benestad would agree with both Sommers and St. Peter. The problem, though, is that some of those who should be evangelizing the culture have been "evangelized" by that culture (248, 336). Moreover, their theological and philosophical educations are sometimes, well, imperfect, resulting in a deformation rather than in a formation (p. 292).
If one were read only one part of this book (which would be too bad!), he or she should carefully read the conclusion, which is a reflection, chiefly, upon the work of William Galston, but includes comments about John Rawls and Stephen Macedo as well. All that is missing is greater reflection about the work of Alasdair MacIntyre, only one of whose books is mentioned in the bibliography (and his name is misspelled there [about the only "negative" observation I can manage about this excellent book!]).
The late Russell Kirk used to say that genuine education is about wisdom and virtue--and so it is. At one time, both "Athens" and "Jersusalem" understood that education means leading out of the darkness into the light of the Sun (which Christians would have spelled Son). That education concerns, chiefly, the aretaic art of character development, which is largely lost today; until we revive that, we will continue in the moral depravity which too extensively signifies our times. "A democracy in conformity with the moral law," Professor Benestad writes, "would promote the dignity of the human person, protect human rights, and have the common good as an end" (p. 102). We think, he says, in terms of rights, whereas we ought to think in terms of duties. Blaise Pascal would have understood that: "[Our] whole duty," Pascal tried to teach us, "lies in thinking as [we] ought." Also agreeing would have been Flannery O'Connor, who told us that "The truth does not change according to our ability to stomach it emotionally." There are hard truths--for example, the fact of sin--which wishful thinking cannot eradicate and may even "enable," by persisting in the delusion of redemption by political action or by economic tinkering.
Professor Benestad's volume is a perceptive and engaging contribution to a conversation about the virtues (and, one hopes, the resulting personal conversions) which lie at the heart of Catholic Social Doctrine. Warmly recommended!

Erthai
Arrived on time and as expected.

Jothris
Okay

It's a good book. It's written clearly. It's an easy and informative read. I benefit from the time spent reading it.

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