pbstudio
e-Book Happiness and Education download

e-Book Happiness and Education download

by Nel Noddings

ISBN: 0521807638
ISBN13: 978-0521807630
Language: English
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (July 7, 2003)
Pages: 318
Category: Schools and Teaching
Subategory: Learning

ePub size: 1540 kb
Fb2 size: 1167 kb
DJVU size: 1481 kb
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 733
Other Formats: rtf docx azw lit

Happiness and Education is especially commended to the attention of public and private school teachers, and administrative policy makers as informed, thoughtful, and thought-provoking reading.

Happiness and Education is especially commended to the attention of public and private school teachers, and administrative policy makers as informed, thoughtful, and thought-provoking reading. Happiness and Education is ultimately a critique of American culture, not just its educational system. But Noddings shows how the narrow curriculum found in most classrooms helps shape a culture with misguided priorities.

Happiness and education, Nel Noddings. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. n the past few months, when I have told people that I’m writing a book on happiness and education, more than one has responded with some puzzlement, But they don’t go together!

Happiness and education, Nel Noddings. n the past few months, when I have told people that I’m writing a book on happiness and education, more than one has responded with some puzzlement, But they don’t go together! Indeed, the fact that the two seem increasingly opposed these days is one motive for tackling the topic. Happiness and education are, properly, inti-mately related: Happiness should be an aim of education, and a good education should contribute signicantly to personal and collective happiness.

Happiness and Education book. Nel Noddings worked in many areas of the education system. She spent seventeen years as an elementary and high school mathematics teacher and school administrator, before earning her PhD and beginning work as an academic in the fields of philosophy of education, theory of education and ethics, specifically moral education and ethics of care.

Nel Noddings is Lee L. Jacks Professor of Education, Emerita, at Stanford University. She is author of 12 books; the latest two are Educating Moral People: A Caring Alternative to Character Education and Starting at Home: Caring and Social Policy, both published in 2002. Noddings spent 15 years as teacher, administrator, and curriculum developer in public schools; she served as Director of the Laboratory Schools at the University of Chicago. At Stanford, she received the Award for Teaching Excellence three times, most recently in 1997.

Nel Noddings (1929- ) has made a significant contribution to our appreciation of education. In particular her explorations of the ethics of care – and their relationship to schooling, welfare, and to learning and teaching within families and local communities came at a especially apposite moment. She has been able to demonstrate the significance of caring and relationship both as an educational goal, and as a fundamental aspect of education. As a result Nel Noddings’ work has become a key reference point for those wanting to reaffirm the ethical and moral foundations of teaching, schooling and.

Why, then, is happiness rarely mentioned as a goal of education? .

Why, then, is happiness rarely mentioned as a goal of education? This book explores what we might teach if we were to take happiness seriously as a goal of education. Criticizing our current almost exclusive emphasis on economic well-being and pleasure, Nel Noddings discusses the contributions of making a home, parenting, cherishing a place, the development of character, interpersonal growth, finding work that one loves, and participating in a democratic way of life. Finally, she explores ways in which to make schools and classrooms cheerful places.

Happiness and Education. Book · January 2003 with 398 Reads. How we measure 'reads'. Nell Noddings is Lee L. She is past president of the Philosophy of Education Society and of the John Dewey Society.

When parents are asked what they want for their children, they usually answer that they want their children to be happy. Why, then, is happiness rarely mentioned as a goal of education? This book explores what we might teach if we were to take happiness seriously as a goal of education. It asks, first, what it means to be happy and, second, how we can help children to understand it. It notes that we have to develop a capacity for unhappiness and a willingness to alleviate the suffering of others to be truly happy. Criticizing our current almost exclusive emphasis on economic well-being and pleasure, Nel Noddings discusses the contributions of making a home, parenting, cherishing a place, the development of character, interpersonal growth, finding work that one loves, and participating in a democratic way of life. Finally, she explores ways in which to make schools and classrooms cheerful places. Nell Noddings is Lee L. Jacks Professor of Education, Emerita, at Stanford University. She is past president of the Philosophy of Education Society and of the John Dewey Society. In addition to twelve books, she is the author of more than 170 articles and chapters on various topics ranging from the ethics of care to mathematical problem solving. Her latest books are Starting at Home: Caring and Social Policy (University of California Press) and Educating Moral People: A Caring Alternative to Character Education (Teachers College Press), both published in 2002.
Comments:
Agalas
Nel Noddings has always been on of my favorite writers in education! She captures the what I would call the 'spiritual' side of education and discusses the importance of looking past tests and teacher paperwork!

one life
By the time I read this book, I had already read several others by Nel Noddings. This one did not add much more to what I already knew. I purchased the book for my dissertation. I did not use this one at all.

Braswyn
Nel Noddings absolutely hits the nail on the head with her discussion of how we need to reevaluate the aims of our educational system. As it is currently situated, education serves almost entirely an economic function, in preparing students to enter the workforce and become good consumers in a successful economy. Whatever social functions the school serves are relegated to the background, and in fact tend to be discouraged if they are ever considered to be possibly getting in the way of the true goals. Of course, Noddings is also right in that we seem to have even lost focus of our original economic aims. The need to compete with others in standardized testing has forced students to learn things that may be becoming increasingly less and less relevant - Noddings's point about how asking an algebra teacher says that the point of a lesson is always going to be related only to other algebra lessons is something that every student of the school system has been frustrated with at one point or another (75).

Fortunately, Noddings does not fall into the trap that I envisioned as possible - that she would instead declare that the defined goal of education should be happiness. Such a lofty but ultimately nonsubstantive goal would be, to put it quite simply, silly, and ultimately even worse than the economic goals of the current arrangement. Fortunately, Noddings avoids the mistake of trying to make a singular definition of happiness and then working toward it. Instead, the final two thirds of the book are devoted to various different parts of life that Noddings would like to see become more prominent as aims of education. What makes the book so good is in how Noddings successfully weaves in the notion of happiness throughout all of these elements of life - which include raising a family, spirituality, participation in the democratic process, and, yes, in the workplace - together with the discussion of how education must be aimed toward these goals. It is almost as if the book is a collaboration of two distinct theses - how these parts of life are important to our happiness, and how education must serve these parts of life - and that seems to be the reason for how the book flows as well as it does when it is based on a topic like happiness that in lesser hands would be incredibly trite and quickly grow repetitive.

Of the two theses, neither is easy to quibble with. In regard to the thesis about how schools need to refocus their aims toward more relevant applications, I certainly have no disagreement; I believe that we clearly have lost track of what schools should be about and that the U.S. educational system is slowly careening toward greater and greater irrelevance (although it probably isn't much of a new phenomenon after all; how much of what scholars studied in ancient times was really necessary for their life experiences?). The idea of how the various elements that Noddings discusses as being keys to personal happiness are somewhat more spurious, in that personal happiness is by definition personal, and what makes one person happy is going to be far different from what makes another person happy (traditional education does make many lifelong scholars happy, for one). But Noddings does allow for this, and so I have no quarrel with her desire to try to point out some elements that typically make people happy for the sake of the argument.

Consider a sample sentence from the introduction to chapter 7; the introductions to all of the chapters in parts 2 and 3 of the book are structured quite similarly: "Possibly there is no human task more demanding, more rewarding, and more universal than parenting, and yet our schools apparently think that algebra and Shakespeare are more important" (138). The point of how schools are inadequate in their current aims is constantly reinforced. Here Noddings makes the argument that education needs to be reshaped such that students become more acquainted with concepts like child-rearing and how parents can play effective roles in their children's lives, "without preaching or direct instruction" (156). Noddings is right in having to address this final qualifier, since such nontraditional lessons might be controversial if they try to teach right and wrong answers in the same way that algebra might. But that doesn't mean we shouldn't try to go in that direction. After all, having an open discussion about the legitimacy of educational lessons is far from being the worst thing that could happen. The worst thing, rather, would be to maintain our current inertia.

Jairani
Even though I live in Norway where the educational system works differently than in the US, this book was a real eyeopener to me. In a time where the school focuses more and more on the student's achievements in basic subjects like math, reading and writing, and where there's been put more and more weight on testing the students in these skills, this book represent and alternative way of thinking. Do we all need an academic education? Why do we educate students in the thought that all of them should go on with their studies beyond a collegelevel? What about all those occupations where you don't need academic skills, those occupations where you need practical skills? (skills that you weren't taught in school because the weight was put on the teoretical subjects). Being a teacher or a parent, this book will give you a new perspective on how to raise and educate our children.

e-Book Miss Happiness and Miss Flower download

Miss Happiness and Miss Flower epub fb2

by Gary Blythe,Rumer Godden
ISBN: 1405088567
ISBN13: 978-1405088565
language: English
ISBN: 0849914787
ISBN13: 978-0849914782
language: English
Subcategory: Bible Study and Reference
ISBN: 0143008102
ISBN13: 978-0143008101
language: English
Subcategory: Parenting
ISBN: 1401921825
ISBN13: 978-1401921828
language: English
Subcategory: Happiness
ISBN: 1419663135
ISBN13: 978-1419663130
language: English
Subcategory: Happiness
ISBN: 0595231403
ISBN13: 978-0595231409
language: English
Subcategory: Happiness
ISBN: 0304326011
ISBN13: 978-0304326013
language: English
Subcategory: Education
ISBN: 0091939836
ISBN13: 978-0091939830
language: English
Subcategory: Family Relationships
ISBN: 0892391227
ISBN13: 978-0892391226
language: English
Subcategory: Growing Up and Facts of Life
ISBN: 7560047319
ISBN13: 978-7560047317
language: Chinese