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e-Book The Trial: A History from Socrates to O.J. Simpson download

e-Book The Trial: A History from Socrates to O.J. Simpson download

by Sadakat Kadri

ISBN: 0007111215
ISBN13: 978-0007111213
Language: English
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers Ltd (April 4, 2005)
Pages: 336
Category: Rules and Procedures
Subategory: Lex

ePub size: 1334 kb
Fb2 size: 1314 kb
DJVU size: 1281 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 522
Other Formats: mbr doc docx azw

Heavy going, but worth the effort.

One theme is the role of evidence in criminal prosecutions. Heavy going, but worth the effort.

A bold and brilliant debut from a prize-winning writer. Reconciliation and vengeance, secrecy and spectacle, superstition and reason all intertwine continually.

Sadakat Kadri (born in 1964 in London) is a lawyer, author, travel writer and journalist. One of his foremost roles as a barrister was to assist in the prosecution of former Malawian president Hastings Banda. As a member of the New York Bar he has worked as a volunteer with the American Civil Liberties Union. He has also specialised in freedom of information issues ]

The book quotes from countless chronicles, pamphlets, transcripts and newspaper reports but mine is the only voice to keep the babble in line

Events elsewhere would further delineate its structure. Before Prague I had studied at Harvard and qualified for the New York Bar, and it seemed a sensible idea – or at least a pleasant one – to relocate to the United States. The book quotes from countless chronicles, pamphlets, transcripts and newspaper reports but mine is the only voice to keep the babble in line. The task that lay ahead when I began was a daunting one.

Sadakat Kadri (born 1964 in London) is a lawyer, author, travel writer and journalist. 2012: Heaven on Earth: A Journey Through Shari'a Law from the Deserts of Ancient Arabia to the Streets of the Modern Muslim World, ISBN 978-0-374-16872-8.

Not Sadakat Kadri, it would seem, who has managed to do just that, while also practising law in New York and the UK. He's also (rather irritatingly) managed to making it genuinely interesting.

It is only our conception of time that makes us call the Last Judgment by that name; in fact it is a permanent court-martial.

1 From Eden to Ordeals. It is only our conception of time that makes us call the Last Judgment by that name; in fact it is a permanent court-martial. FRANZ KAFKA, Aphorisms. One of the few things that humanity has agreed upon for most of history is that its laws descend directly from the gods.

Simpson By Sadakat Kadri Illustrated. Mr. Kadri proposes much more than he delivers.

In an extraordinary history of the criminal trial, Sadakat Kadri traces the development of criminal justice from the marbled courtrooms of Athens, past the torture chambers of the Inquisition to the judicial theatres of seventeenth-century Salem, from 1930s Moscow and post-war Nuemberg to the virtual courtooms of modern Hollywood. For as long as accuser and accused have faced each other in public, criminal trials have been establishing more than who did what to whom, and in this fascinating book Sadakat Kadri, a practicing barrister, surveys over four thousand years of courtroom drama. Encyclopaedic and entertaining, comprehensive and colourful, The Trial addresses many profound themes with verve and wit. Who has the right to judge, and why? What did past civilisations hope to achieve through scapegoats and sacrifices - and to what extent are defendants still made to bear the sins of society at large? In the book, Kadri journeys from the silence of ancient Egypt's Hall of the Dead to the clamour of twenty-first century Hollywood to show how emotions and fears have inspired western notions of justice - and the extent to which they still riddle its trials today. He explains, for example, how juries emerged in medieval England as a variation on trials by fire and water, a divinely supervised validation of vengeance, and how delusions precisely identical to those that sent witches to the stake revived as Satanic child abuse accusations during the 1980s. Although Justice's sword has always been double-edged - as ready to destroy a community's enemies as to defend its dreams of due process - the judicial contest also operates to enshrine some of the western world's most cherished values. The show trials of Stalin's Soviet Union were shams, but Guantanamo Bay and Abu Ghraib act as a reminder that no-trials are equally unjust, and at a time when our familiar constitutional landscape seems to be melting away, an appreciation of the criminal courtroom's history is more necessary than ever.
Comments:
Zinnthi
How did the jury trial system get started?

Surprisingly as a trial attorney, even I didn't know the answer until reading this book. And it turns out the answer starts in ancient Babylon, detours to Mt. Sinai, stops briefly at ancient Athens, has a sojourn in the Roman Empire before finally wending its way through Christendom, the Roman Catholic Church and then ultimately to British common law.

In other words we have managed to inherit our legal traditions concerning the treatment of criminal defendants the same way that we've inherited our other traditions...through the accidents and mis steps of history itself.

And it also turns out that Sadikat Kadri, BOTH London barrister AND member of the New York state bar turns out to be an excellent guide making history about stories and interesting ones at that.

Through his eyes we watch as Socrates mounts his suicidal defense in ancient Athens. We're there when Marc Antony gives perhaps the pre eminent lawyer of all time, Cicero, the death sentence that others including Shakespeare later fantasize about giving all lawyers. We join him in marvelling at the unfilled promise of the Justinian law code, buried for ten centuries under the rubble of the dark ages. We see the first -- otherwise forgettable -- jury trial take place in 1220 England.

And then we watch the trial evolve from a presumption of guilt to one of innocence, a presumption against Defendants failing to talk to today's privilege against self incrimination, and into being basically the replacement for ancient "gladitor justice" where crowds could thrill at the bloodied hands of the victor to today where crowds watched to see if the bloodied glove actually fits.

Significantly, Kadri also shows us those other competing legal traditions that lack the right of juries...the cannonical law of the European continent wherein a judge alone inquisitorial rules on both the law and facts and the communist system wherein the "judge" is handed his rulings from higher authority.

Kadri shows us that while, for example the European continent was aflame with witch burnings, the jury sytem -- by its open and public nature -- actually helped put out the fires of witch hunt justice.

And indeed, those interested in further reading will quickly learn that trial attorneys, unless they know the judge, overwhelmingly prefer jury trials because juries have been shown to acquit twenty percent more often than judge tried cases without juries.

To be sure, in its long history and today, the jury system has made its errors.

Still the same, as inherited traditions go, our modern jury system remains the best tool against prosecutorial abuse and in that way...against tyranny itself.

Melipra
This is a fascinating book. Admittedly I'm a lawyer and I love the stuff. But much of her history revolves around legal history this book provides a wonderful travel time with compelling and fascinating examples.if you want a history of the criminal trial, this is it!

Nothing personal
The book is full of interesting anecdotes, but it tends to dwell on some topics too long and the prose is not exactly an easy flow, so it turned out to be a difficult read. I cannot say I enjoyed the book that much, even though I was looking forward to the topic.

Vareyma
This is a fascinating book, but it will challenge most readers' fortitude. Kadri has produced an exhaustively researched and thoughtfully written history of legal jurisprudence. Chock-full of amazing and amusing stories of trials from Socrates to O J Simpson. And yet...Kadri's style tends to be a little too erudite and convoluted. Heavy going, but worth the effort.

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e-Book Expert Evidence and Criminal Jury Trials download

Expert Evidence and Criminal Jury Trials epub fb2

by Ian Freckelton QC,Jane Goodman-Delahunty,Jacqueline Horan,Blake McKimmie
ISBN: 0198746342
ISBN13: 978-0198746348
language: English
Subcategory: Criminal Law
ISBN: 906544937X
ISBN13: 978-9065449375
language: English
Subcategory: Criminal Law