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e-Book Cakes and Ale download

e-Book Cakes and Ale download

by W. Somerset Maugham

ISBN: 0375725024
ISBN13: 978-0375725029
Language: English
Publisher: Vintage; Reprint edition (December 5, 2000)
Pages: 320
Category: Genre Fiction
Subategory: Literature

ePub size: 1259 kb
Fb2 size: 1292 kb
DJVU size: 1343 kb
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 283
Other Formats: rtf docx lrf mbr

Cakes and Ale. With an introduction by. Nicholas Shakespeare. This book is sold subject to the condition that it shall not, by way of trade or otherwise, be lent, resold, hired out, or otherwise circulated without the publisher’s prior consent in any form of binding or cover other than that in which it is published and without a similar condition, including this condition, being imposed on the subsequent purchaser.

Cakes and Ale, or, The Skeleton in the Cupboard (1930) is a novel by the British author W. Somerset Maugham

Cakes and Ale, or, The Skeleton in the Cupboard (1930) is a novel by the British author W. Somerset Maugham. Maugham exposes the misguided social snobbery levelled at the character Rosie Driffield, whose frankness, honesty, and sexual freedom make her a target of conservative propriety. Her character is treated favourably by the book's narrator, Ashenden, who understands that she was a muse to the many artists who surrounded her, and who himself enjoyed her sexual favours.

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Somerset Maugham’s books. This is nowhere near a complete bibliography. 1930 Cakes and Ale: or, the Skeleton in the Cupboard 1930 The Gentleman in the Parlour: A Record of a Journey From Rangoon to Haiphong 1931 Six Stories Written in the First Person Singular (short story collection) 1932 The Narrow Corner 1933 Ah King (short story collection) 1933 Sheppey (play) 1935 Don Fernando (travel book) 1936 Cosmopolitans (29 very brief short stories) 1937.

Only 19 left in stock (more on the way). Not much I can say about Somerset Maugham or "Cakes and Ale" that hasn't already been said by much more articulent people than I. Just let me say that this is, perhaps, the best Maugham work I've read, in large part because I read it AFTER absorbing Selina Hastings' superb biography of Maugham. Once you know the backstory, Maugham's novel takes on added life.

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Cakes and Ale. by. W.

Publisher's Note: Obvious typographical errors have been silently corrected. As part of the conversion of the book to its new digital format, we have made certain minor adjustments in its layout, and have added a table of contents. by W.

Cakes and Ale, or, The Skeleton in the Cupboard is a novel by the British author W. Somerset Maugham But the book I like best is Cakes and Ale. Maugham drew his title from the remark of Sir Toby Belch to Malvolio in William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night: "Dost thou think, because thou art virtuous, there shall be no more cakes and ale?" Late in life, Somerset Maugham claimed that this was the favourite among his novels and it is easy to see why, with its wit and provocative themes handled with consummate skill. But the book I like best is Cakes and Ale. because in its pages lives for me again the woman with the lovely smile who was the model for Rosie Driffield.

Cakes and Ale, comic novel by W. Somerset Maugham, published in 1930. The story is told by Willie Ashenden, a character who previously appeared in Maugham’s short-story collection Ashenden

Cakes and Ale, comic novel by W. The story is told by Willie Ashenden, a character who previously appeared in Maugham’s short-story collection Ashenden.

Cakes and Ale is a delicious satire of London literary society between the . Wise, witty, deeply satisfying, Cakes and Ale is Maugham at his best.

Cakes and Ale is a delicious satire of London literary society between the Wars. Social climber Alroy Kear is flattered.

Cakes and Ale is a delicious satire of London literary society between the Wars. Social climber Alroy Kear is flattered when he is selected by Edward Driffield's wife to pen the official biography of her lionized novelist husband, and determined to write a bestseller. But then Kear discovers the great novelist's voluptuous muse (and unlikely first wife), Rosie. The lively, loving heroine once gave Driffield enough material to last a lifetime, but now her memory casts an embarrissing shadow over his career and respectable image.  Wise, witty, deeply satisfying, Cakes and Ale is Maugham at his best.
Comments:
Alsath
I could easily say that W. Somerset Maugham's "Cakes and Ale" is not the powerhouse novel that was "Of Human Bondage" or "The Magician" or "The Razor's Edge" and I feel quite sure that quite a few readers might agree with me and, to a large extent, it is not but it has a character, Rosie Driffield, who is so unique, so seductive, enchanting, and mysterious that she carries this book to the heights of the previously mentioned novels by Mr. Maugham. That a writer could create such a truly fascinating character is a tribute to the author. Even when she is not mentioned during parts of the book, her presence hangs over the book like beautiful California sunshine. She is a gem that shines everlasting.

The book is about writers and the real and fake legacies they leave behind depending on the likes and dislikes of the time and place they are being discussed, but if there is one thing that is true it is that despite the period "Rosie" transcends both space and time and she makes this a magnificent book.

Heraly
Not much I can say about Somerset Maugham or "Cakes and Ale" that hasn't already been said by much more articulent people than I. Just let me say that this is, perhaps, the best Maugham work I've read, in large part because I read it AFTER absorbing Selina Hastings' superb biography of Maugham. Once you know the backstory, Maugham's novel takes on added life. His parodying of fellow writer Hugh Walpole, for example, in the character of Alroy Kear, is delicious to read.

Doukasa
In the late 1920's, an aged literary lion, a venerated late Victorian novelist, Edward Driffield, has died and his widow thinks his life should be written down. She appeals to a younger novelist, Alroy Kear, who had attached himself to their society. In turn, he appeals to a friend who he knows must have known the legend earlier in life. The friend he turns to is the first-person narrator of CAKES AND ALE, Ashenden, also a novelist, who gradually reveals to the reader the truth of the deceased's early life. How much he will reveal to the other characters is another thing, and even if he did, the controlling widow, the man's second and much younger wife, would most likely excise what does not fit the public image she had worked hard to preserve. When it comes to pinning down a protagonist, however, the novel turns on the character of Rosie, Driffield's long-gone first wife.

Several things are going on in CAKES AND ALE. One is the real history of Edward Driffield (whose stature and career bear something of a resemblance to Thomas Hardy, who died in 1928), and the narrator's own interlinked coming of age. Then there is the narrator's scathing look at literary society and the machinations by which critical success and public favor are won. He drops a lot of industry insider jokes, and several actual personages are discussed, but he also returns to the eternal writers' theme of who among them will be read past their deaths. Lastly, the sharp contrast between Victorian life and 20th century existence emerges as a dramatic theme; there is the sense that those with one foot in each culture will never be able to fully absorb the rapid change in mores and fashions. The only figure who floats across the divide is the person who from the outset bucked convention of any kind, Rosie.

Maugham infuses the narrative with a sharp wit and good conversation. It is very shrewd and justifiably cynical about human ambitions and weaknesses. The dramatic story unfolds slowly but with tensions and secrets that keep going until the very end. This remains very satisfying reading 75 years after publication.

Prorahun
Like traveling in time, a story about a girl- a different type of girl, in a time were being different was even harder than now - all through the lens of a writer/lover.

Kagda
What a lovely novel! The reader can curl up in the discursive style as if it were a nice warm quilt, enjoying the leisurely unfolding of the story and the characters in perfect comfort. Moreover, this is a very funny book, about the British class system and the literary world a hundred years ago. Plus que ca change --- . It's also clearly a roman a clef, which adds to the fun. Great read.

Frey
The book group at the LGBT Center in NYC discussed this book in April 2010.

Everyone liked this book and a couple of us thought that it was great. It's definitely fun and, ultimately, moving. While there's no explicitly gay content in the novel, we generally agreed that the narrator (who remains unmarried throughout his life) is gay, as are a number of other characters (including Alroy Kear, with whom the narrator "had been intimate" in the past - but grown apart; Lord Scallion, who finds brunch "too divine;" and the hiking American tourists).

In most first person novels, the narrator is the center of the action, but in this case, it's the delightful Rosie, the former barmaid who marries the eminent Victorian author, Edward Driffield, and whose good-natured gregarious behavior (and affairs!) the second Mrs. Driffield tries to hide. Told in flashbacks, we learn more and more about the narrator, Rosie, the second Mrs. Driffield, and her ass-kissing followers (who have to work very hard to maintain Mr. Driffield's reputation after his second marriage to the stodgy wife). The final chapters revel more about Rosie and her husband, as well as the crucial role that the narrator played in their lives, so that the novel ends on an exhilarating note.

For some of us, it was hard to understand the English class system, the snotty behavior by some people (including the maid), the satire about the late Victorian literary society, and the outrage that a realistic novel caused. A few of the characters and events seemed to be in place only to make satiric points, and seemed unnecessary. Some of the readers said this is not the best Maugham, but it seemed like a great introduction to me. (Be sure to read Maugham's biography in Wikipedia for some real dirt about this author.)

Tto
I read a great deal of this author's works and enjoyed it very much.

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