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e-Book Moondeath download

e-Book Moondeath download

by Rick Hautala

ISBN: 0821718444
ISBN13: 978-0821718445
Language: English
Publisher: Zebra; Reissue edition (October 1, 1986)
Category: Genre Fiction
Subategory: Literature

ePub size: 1449 kb
Fb2 size: 1710 kb
DJVU size: 1391 kb
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 551
Other Formats: mobi lrf rtf doc

This work has been reprinted with permission from the author.

Hautala's strong point has always been his firm grip of character and motivation, and the mechanics of the horror story itself. Moondeath, on the surface, would seem to be a standard werewolf thriller, but Hautala rips the rug out from beneath your feet. A worthwhile addtition to any horror fan's library.

He has also published four novels-The White Room, Looking Glass, Unbroken, and Follow-using the pseudonym A. J. Matthews. His more than sixty published short stories AKA .

Glimpses: The Best Short Stories of Rick Hautala: a short story collection, Dark Regions Press, 2013. Rick Hautala (1949-2013).

Star Road: a science fiction novel, co-written with Matthew Costello, Thomas Dunne/St. Martin’s, January 7, 2014. Mockingbird Bay: a novel, to be published by JournalStone, May 9, 2014. Chills: a novel, Cemetery Dance, November 2013. Glimpses: The Best Short Stories of Rick Hautala: a short story collection, Dark Regions Press, 2013. Indian Summer: a novella, published by CD Publications, December 2012. Occasional Demons: a short story collection, published by CD Publications, 2010.

Rick Hautala (February 3, 1949 – March 21, 2013) was an American speculative fiction and horror writer. He graduated from the University of Maine in 1974 where he received a Master of Art in English Literature. Rick arrived on the horror scene in 1980 with many of his early novels published by Zebra books. He has written and published over 90 novels and short stories since the early 1980s.

Moondeath, Rick Hautala's first published horror novel, centers around a small town that is slowing seeing its population decreasing. The main character guesses the origin of the creature, but is unable to convince the longtime citizens

Moondeath, Rick Hautala's first published horror novel, centers around a small town that is slowing seeing its population decreasing. The main character guesses the origin of the creature, but is unable to convince the longtime citizens. The town always reports the deaths to the media in a way that makes no mention of animal attacks. The conclusion is a little weak, especially after the long buildup. Although predictable, the novel is still entertaining. Hautala's style is very smooth and the novel is an easy read. This is not his best work, nor the one for which he is best known

Moondeath by Rick Hautala - book cover, description, publication history

Moondeath by Rick Hautala - book cover, description, publication history. Similar books by other authors.

Till death us do party. 99. 20. Featured post. The Casket Chronicle Into Horror? Join the community.

Book by Hautala, Rick
Comments:
Castiel
I just recently discovered this novel and I thoroughly enjoyed it. There is a dearth of good werewolf novels out there and this deserves to be ranked highly among them. The obvious similarity would be to `Salem's Lot. A werewolf suddenly appears in a Peyton Place-like New England town. Of course, nobody really knows it is a werewolf - there are just unexplained deaths around each full moon. The novel takes its time building suspense and developing the relationships among all the characters of the small community.

This is a well-written first novel that deals well with the concept of lycanthropy. It doesn't treat it ironically as many recent novels have. A worthwhile read!

Haracetys
Rick Hautala was one those horror writers touted as the "next Stephen King" back in the 80s and all-but forgotten today. I remember he had a bunch of books out for a few years and then just disappeared. I always meant to read him, but never got around to it until I was in a used bookstore last week and stumbled across his name. I was all, like, "Oh, yeah! I remember seeing that guy on the shelf back in the day! Let's give him a test drive." Even though it had the worst cover, Moondeath was the novel I picked out. I did not realize Moondeath was his first novel, though I guess I should have, given the crappy old school cover art and 1980 copyright date. Anyway, it sounded interesting, plus it had the "best new horror novel" endorsement by Stephen King, so I figured that was good enough for me. I paid a couple bucks, flirted with the cashier, took it home, and began reading . . .

THE STORY
Bob Wentworth is a divorced high school teacher who wants to get away from his bitchy ex-wife and troubled past. He takes a job in the sleepy New Hampshire town of Cooper Falls, which turns out to not be so sleepy after all. He begins a relationship with local librarian Lisa Carter. The problem is she is married to an abusive, cheating drunk. Several other townsfolk have similarly dysfunctional slice-of-life stories, including the town slut, suspicious deputy sheriff, and school nerd. And people are dying, supposedly the victims of a "wild dog." Like in Jaws (Two-Disc 30th Anniversary Edition), the powers that be in town conspire to hide the murders and pass them off as accidents. Meanwhile, we get cutaways to a sexy witch conducting moon-based black magic, and the werewolf stalking, killing, and eating people.

A MIXED BAG
It's a bit slow, and sometimes confusing with the dates of the action in the chapters switching around or jumping forward, and not a lot happens for a long time. I know, sounds real interesting, right? Well, hang on--it's not bad, and it does have some good stuff in it. Moondeath is kind of like 'Salem's Lot, but with a witch and a werewolf instead of vampires. It's just nowhere near as good.

THE CONS
Rick's style is clearly rough around the edges here. He basically does everything any decent "how to write great fiction" book tells you not to (although these books didn't exist at the time Rick wrote this, so I'll cut him some slack). Let me lay it out for you:

There are a lot of horrible adverbs (all the characters like to do things angrily, sadly, gently--basically anything ending in "-ly").

There is rampant word repetition separated by commas (e.g., "I've, I've got to tell you," instead of the more accepted stuttering self-interruption of "I-I've got to tell you," or "N-no!"). Seeing the same words twice (even with a comma in-between) is super-annoying since it looks like they're typos, not real dialogue. I don't know anyone who constantly repeats themselves like this and pretty much every single character in this book does it multiple times. It feels like it happens every few pages.

Then there are the usual problems of too many dialogue attributions (when we already know who's talking to who) and unnecessary action tags to mix up the already too many attributions.

Too many exclamation points feels manipulative, like Rick is forcing me to feel excited about things happening when it should be up to me to decide how I feel. And most of the time, I'm not feeling his exclamation points are appropriate. He could have stressed the information he wanted better by making them into separate one or two line paragraphs and/or using italics to call them out to the reader's attention. Exclamation points should only be used in a character's dialogue or thoughts, not when the author is describing action, shock, suspense, horror, etc.

Rick really seems enamored of the word "snapped" as an action, so everything is always snapped on or off, open or shut--basically, anytime he can reasonably say something "snapped," he does. The word's overuse becomes distracting.

And Zebra Books (the innovators who brought us the cheesy "Horror Hologram" book cover in the 80s) did their usual bad job editing the book because there are a fair number of typos. How many of these are Rick's and how many Zebra's, I have no idea.

I did not really connect that well to Bob (the hero). Not much happens to him, almost like he's only there to be the outsider who must convince the town there's a werewolf on the prowl. He does a really bad job. His "B" story is his love affair with Lisa, and his personal problem is his past coming back to haunt him at his job. The relationship is bland, but the job stuff feels extremely thin and tacked-on. We hardly get any scenes of Bob teaching English, and all of a sudden, three hundred some pages in, Bob is confronted by oppositional forces within the school administration that I don't remember even meeting before. He should have had more interactions with the administration and his students. Most of the time, the way the book keeps skipping ahead in time (to get to the next full moon werewolf action), it didn't even feel like the hero had a job.

Also, Bob switches between being angry and kind of a jerk to being a crybaby loser and a quitter. Lisa (who is no prize herself) dumps him and leaves him crying by the side of the road at one point. Seriously? I can't even remember them having sex yet. Then in the next chapter, they are magically back together as a couple with no explanation (except a week had passed). You can't just flip-flop character feelings and relationships offstage like that. I almost stopped reading at that point, and spent the next several chapters wondering if I was wasting my time or not. Things picked up again after that, thankfully, but then . . .

When Bob finally proves the werewolf is real, but loses his teaching job, he just decides to leave town. The hero shouldn't be the reluctant hero this many pages in. He should be committed to his goal. Part of the problem is his only real ally is wimpy librarian Lisa, and she doesn't even believe him and isn't even sure she wants to be with him once she finds out about his past. All this makes him kind of a crappy lead. Not cardboard, but inconsistent, and not as well-developed as he should have been. He's no Ben Mears from 'Salem's Lot, that's for sure. He's like the anti-Mears, a cut and run loser who thinks the world's against him.

I also was let-down by the witch, when her motivations were revealed and most of the mystery resolved (with 150 pages still left to go to catch the werewolf). After all the build-up, the witch was not cool at all. Total disappointment.

All of this makes for a bit of an awkward, clumsy read, plus there's the inexcusably lame cover art. I can't even tell it's a werewolf novel by looking at it. It looks like maybe it's a were-panther, but even then, I get eyestrain trying to make out the details in that muddy black cloud.

THE PROS
That said, Rick's style is friendly and easy-going. It's clear the guy's putting his heart and soul onto the page, even when it isn't perfect. You can tell he's got talent, he just needs an editor and a bit of self-restraint.

He's got a good ear for describing details (e.g., ". . . rows of tombstones reminding him of broken teeth") and for developing some of his supporting cast (just not his boring lead, Bob). He's also doing some decent mystery-building, because he doesn't give away who the witch is right away, or even what the hell is going on. Just enough to keep me reading . . .

The way most of the scenes are described, I can see them in my mind's eye playing out like the 1978 Salem's Lot or The Howling (Special Edition) because the story is told in a very cinematic way. That's a huge plus.

There are some cool horror scenes in here, namely the witch's sex magic and the werewolf kills, but the one that sticks out the most for me was the first time the hero gets a good look at the werewolf. He thinks it's a wild dog until the beast rears up on its hind legs and covers its eyes with human hands to avoid the glare of an oncoming car's headlights. That in particular stood out as really cool and creepy to me.

Last (and best of all), the sexy witch is always getting off shoving chicken blood and other gooey stuff inside herself during her semi-frequent naked black magic scenes. 'Nuff said.

THE VERDICT
It reads more or less like early Stephen King, so it's a very accessible horror novel, but not nearly as polished or well-developed as King's books of the same period. The ending seems very "TV movie of the week" and the weird epilogue doesn't make much sense (okay, part of it makes sense, but the other part makes no sense, and appears to be tossed in just to make the book close out on the weirdest, most shocking note possible).

Overall, Moondeath might be worth picking up for fans of werewolves and 70s/80s horror. I give it a solid 3 stars. It's a decent enough debut, and despite its many flaws, it makes me curious to check out other books by Rick Hautala. Untcigahunk - The Complete Little Brothers is supposed to be his best.

OTHER EDITIONS
Moondeath was reissued in December 2011 by Evil Jester Press after being out-of-print for a few decades. Apparently, there are a lot of new typos in that edition introduced by the electronic scanning process (because that's what this book needs, more typos). Also the new cover art is pretty amateurish, but at least I can tell it's got a wolf on the cover, unlike the 1980 edition.

Dalallador
Moondeath, Rick Hautala's first published horror novel, centers around a small town that is slowing seeing its population decreasing. The main character guesses the origin of the creature, but is unable to convince the longtime citizens. The town always reports the deaths to the media in a way that makes no mention of animal attacks. The conclusion is a little weak, especially after the long buildup.
Although predictable, the novel is still entertaining. Hautala's style is very smooth and the novel is an easy read. This is not his best work, nor the one for which he is best known. If you can locate a copy, read "Little Brothers". Others which I highly recommend are "Night Stone" and "Moon Walker". While long out-of-print, it's worth the effort to try to locate a copy of each.

Iaran
Rick Hautala is Maine's OTHER horror writer (I don't recall who the fellow is right now) and he is quite a good one. Hautala's strong point has always been his firm grip of character and motivation, and the mechanics of the horror story itself. Moondeath, on the surface, would seem to be a standard werewolf thriller, but Hautala rips the rug out from beneath your feet. A worthwhile addtition to any horror fan's library. Recommended.

ISBN: 0843950749
ISBN13: 978-0843950748
language: English
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
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