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e-Book The Real Middle Earth: Exploring the Magic and Mystery of the Middle Ages, J.R.R. Tolkien, and The Lord of the Rings download

e-Book The Real Middle Earth: Exploring the Magic and Mystery of the Middle Ages, J.R.R. Tolkien, and The Lord of the Rings download

by Brian Bates

ISBN: 1403966834
ISBN13: 978-1403966834
Language: English
Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin; Reprint edition (October 29, 2004)
Pages: 320
Category: History and Criticism
Subategory: Literature

ePub size: 1438 kb
Fb2 size: 1609 kb
DJVU size: 1775 kb
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 867
Other Formats: azw doc txt lrf

Of course with the warring of invading tribes over the course of history. So enough of my pschoanalyzing, on to the book itself

Of course with the warring of invading tribes over the course of history. It's good to be reminded of your roots and life before the Judeo-Christian church forced overtaking of everything. One person found this helpful. So enough of my pschoanalyzing, on to the book itself. Bates goes into most everything that was "magic" about those times and is very entertaining in doing so talking about the warrior culture, the concept of wyrd and destiny, shapeshifting, the pre christian gods and how the people related to them, how people related to nature, animals, the forest, the land, the use of spells and magic, dwarves and elves, whether you take.

The Real Middle-Earth book.

The Real Middle Earth brings alive, for the first time, the very real . Brian Bates is a Professor at the University of Brighton. He is the author of the bestselling novel, The Way of the Wyrd.

The Real Middle Earth brings alive, for the first time, the very real civilization in which those who lived had a vision of life animated by beings beyond the material world. Magic was real to these people and they believed their universe was held together by an interlaced web of golden threads visible only to wizards. Looking first at the rich and varied tribes who made up the populace of this mystical land, Bates looks at how the people lived their daily lives in a world of magic and mystery.

The Real Middle Earth brings alive, for the first time, the very real civilization in which those who lived had a vision of. . At its center was Middle Earth, a place peopled by humans, but imbued with spiritual power. It was a real realm that stretched from Old England to Scandinavia and across to western Europe, encompassing Celts, Anglo Saxons and Vikings.

Middle English Vocabulary by . Join Now. Create Post.

part 1 The Lord of the Rings series

part 1 The Lord of the Rings series. Those days, the Third Age of Middle-earth, are now long past, and the shape of all lands has been changed; but the regions in which Hobbits then lived were doubtless the same as those in which they still linger: the North-West of the Old World, east of the Sea. Of their original home the Hobbits in Bilbo's time preserved no knowledge. A love of learning (other than genealogical lore) was far from general among them, but there remained still a few in the older families who studied their own books, and even gathered reports of old times and distant lands from Elves, Dwarves, and Men.

Exploring the Magic and Mystery of the Middle Ages, . Praise for The Real Middle Earth. Tolkien, and "The Lord of the Rings". St. Martin's Griffin. Connect with the author. This is the only book that I have ever read that manages literally to evoke the magic of Anglo-Saxon England, rooting the medieval texts firmly in a landscape, a people and a sense of experience. It situates the English in one corner of a vast enchanted world.

Tolkien readily admitted that the concept of Middle-earth was not his own . I really enjoyed this book. He took all the Lord of the Rings concepts and explained what norse myths they had originated from.

The Real Middle Earth : Exploring the Magic and Mystery of the Middle Ages, J. R. Tolkien, and the Lord of the Rings. He writes in an easy way and obviously loves his subject. I would recommend it. An Enjoyable Exploration of the Magic and Mysteries of the Soul of the Northern European People.

Tolkien’s THE LORD OF THE RINGS, now firmly acknowledged as one of the most popular books of the twentieth century, has captivated generations of readers with its completely convincing fantasy. In The History of The Lord of the Rings, the author�. Poems From The Hobbit.

J.R.R. Tolkien claimed that he based the land of Middle Earth on a real place. The Real Middle Earth brings alive, for the first time, the very real civilization in which those who lived had a vision of life animated by beings beyond the material world.

Magic was real to these people and they believed their universe was held together by an interlaced web of golden threads visible only to wizards. At its center was Middle Earth, a place peopled by humans, but imbued with spiritual power. It was a real realm that stretched from Old England to Scandinavia and across to western Europe, encompassing Celts, Anglo Saxons and Vikings. Looking first at the rich and varied tribes who made up the populace of this mystical land, Bates looks at how the people lived their daily lives in a world of magic and mystery.

Using archaeological, historical, and psychological research, Brian Bates breathes life into this civilization of two thousand years ago in a book that every Tolkien fan will want.

Comments:
lacki
I have enjoyed this book like few others I have read. Professor Bates sucks the reader through a time tunnel into the world of Dark Age (for lack of a better term) Britain, which figured heavily in the world J. R. R. Tolkien tried to create. But this book isn't about that so much, as it is about the evidence we have about the belief system of the Germanic and Celtic peoples of pre-Christian and very early-Christian Britain. This was a belief system where the world was connected by an invisible thread... event to event... person to person... element to element, and where magic was around every corner, behind every tree or rock, within every hill. I read it a chapter at a time, before bed, and I found myself looking forward all day long to the next trip to Middle Earth. This isn't meant to be a point-by-point historical study, although it is helpful for someone like myself who wants to understand the mindset of people in the era (I'm a writer doing research). Rather, it's an attempt to paint a picture of the world as the early English saw it, to allow the reader to see it through their eyes, and maybe appreciate and learn from their point of view. I wanted the book to go on forever.

As a writer doing research into this era (and I have been reading extensive scholarly and historical sources on the era over about a 25 year period - it's an obsession!) I really appreciated the notes on each chapter and the sources Professor Bates was using. They are ones I would have used to try and put such a book together... and that could not have been an easy task.

Vetitc
Always enjoy Brian Bates books. Conversion to digital format had some mistakes but the book has good historical information about the Germanic cultures of Western Europe. Also references Norse influence on the culture as well. People lived in greater harmony with the earth, much like the American Indians. Of course with the warring of invading tribes over the course of history. It's good to be reminded of your roots and life before the Judeo-Christian church forced overtaking of everything.

caif
It was interesting to read about the richness of the pre-roman view of the universe the Celts and other tribes in northern Europe held.

Morlurne
First of all this book talks relativly little about Tolkien or any of his books. What it does is try to capture the "magic" of the places and time periods that Tolkien drew inspiration from for his work, namely post Roman to pre Norman Great Britain, and to a slightly lesser extent Scandinavian and Icelandic society and culture from the same time periods using historical sources, so called "myth", namely the pagan beliefs of the Celts, Norse and Anglo-Saxons and other assorted folk beliefs and tales.

From what I can gather from reading this book the author seems like he has a similar belief that I have always had that Tolkien on one level was conciously trying to help to write a missing part of our (assuming you are of anglo-celtic-norse ancestry) heritage due to our own ancestors poor job of writng down and recording their own history, and in part to the fact that much of what is known of our pre christian history was written by outsiders to the culture, or people with a biased political agenda, and above all Christian church hierarchy who were more or less under orders to discredit our whole culture as of being of the Jewish satan and to force this demonic alien Jew Yahweh/Jesus god upon our people. Even though Tolkien himself was a devout Catholic, I believe he was conciously trying to "fill in the blanks" in a sense, even though the inspiration and the imagination of the Hobbit/LOTR came from his subconcious ancestral memory as well as the written sources of the time that we have.

So enough of my pschoanalyzing, on to the book itself. Bates goes into most everything that was "magic" about those times and is very entertaining in doing so talking about the warrior culture, the concept of wyrd and destiny, shapeshifting, the pre christian gods and how the people related to them, how people related to nature, animals, the forest, the land, the use of spells and magic, dwarves and elves, whether you take these things as real or imaginary superstitions they were 100% real to the people of those times.

This is a great book for anybody who wants to look into the "magic" of those times or for anybody who wants to get a better understanding of where Tolkien got his ideas, both on the concious and subconcious levels.

Uaha
This book examines the dark years of Anglo-Saxon settlement in the area abandoned by the retreating Roman Empire. The comparisons are made to source material which later inspired Tolkien in writing his volumes. Well written, easily readable and quite interesting for persons who are fans of the writings of J.R. Tolkien.

Efmprof
This book is an excellent read. It is very inspiring and informative at the same time. If you like informational reading material, you might like this book. If you like a good book to sit and read, you'll love it!!

The Rollers of Vildar
As a practitioner of the Old Ways, this book is far more informative than many titles out there today. It helps to reconstruct the spiritual ways of our pre-Christian European ancestors as well as give a better understanding of what Germanic Heathens and Celts believed.

They were very deeply spiritual people who were quite connected to the Otherworld. The Divine, including magic, was an integral part of everyday life.

I have LOVED Tolkien since I was a child, not only because he was such a magnificent writer, but because of the genuine Pagan/Heathen beliefs he incorporated into his works. For instance, it is amazing how much Gandalf is like the god Woden/Odin. ("Gandalf" means "magic wand/staff elf" in Old Norse, by the way.)
This book reveals much about what these people believed and has much excellent information contained within. A gem!!!!

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