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e-Book Her Share of the Blessings: Women's Religions among Pagans, Jews, and Christians in the Greco-Roman World download

e-Book Her Share of the Blessings: Women's Religions among Pagans, Jews, and Christians in the Greco-Roman World download

by Ross Shepard Kraemer

ISBN: 0195066863
ISBN13: 978-0195066869
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press (June 25, 1992)
Pages: 288
Category: History and Criticism
Subategory: Literature

ePub size: 1362 kb
Fb2 size: 1232 kb
DJVU size: 1544 kb
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 920
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Almost everything will work again if you unplug it for a few minutes, including you. ― Anne Lamott. Materials for High Temperature Power Generation and Process Plant Applications. 59 MB·31,745 Downloads·New! These proceedings contain the papers covering materials for high temperature power plant. Quality Management for the Technology Sector. 33 MB·19,074 Downloads·New!

A bold new synthesis of the sources for women's religions in the Greco-Roman world which historians of women (including Kraemer herself) have painstakingly collected and analyzed over the past decades. -Bernadette J. Brooten, Harvard University, The Divinity School.

Whether pagan, Jewish, or Christian, religion was an integral part of the lives of women in the Greco-Roman world.

In this pathbreaking volume, Ross Shepard Kraemer provides the first comprehensive look at women's religions in Greco-Roman antiquity.

Apologetics in the Roman Empire. Pagans, Jews, and Christians Christians and Pagans in Roman Britain by Dorothy Watts. Pagans, Jews, and Christians. Christians and Pagans in Roman Britain by Dorothy Watts. Herbert Benario - 1992 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 86:167-167. The Cult of Theos Hypsistos Between Pagans, Jews, and Christians. Stephen Mitchell - 1999 - In Polymnia Athanassiadi & Michael Frede (ed., Pagan Monotheism in Late Antiquity. Oxford University Press.

Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1992.

Pp. ix + 275; 1 figure. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1992. Volume 43 Issue 2 - Richard Hawley. Cite this publication.

In this pathbreaking volume, Kraemer provides the first comprehensive look at women's religions in Greco-Roman antiquity, vividly recreating the religious lives of early Christian, Jewish, and pagan women. She offers many fascinating examples, and in every case, reveals the connections between the social constraints under which women lived and their religious beliefs and practices. Royal Holloway, University of London. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 16 February 2009.

Whether pagan, Jewish, or Christian, religion was an integral part of the lives of women in the Greco-Roman world. Yet studies of the ancient Mediterranean world have focused almost exclusively on the religious beliefs and practices of men. In Her Share of the Blessings, Ross Shepard Kraemer provides the first comprehensive look at women's religions in Greco-Roman antiquity. She vividly recreates the religious lives of early Christian, Jewish, and pagan women, with many fascinating examples: Greek women's devotion to goddesses, rites of Roman matrons, Jewish women in rabbinic and diaspora communities, Christian women's struggles to exercise authority and autonomy, and women's roles as leaders in the full spectrum of Greco-Roman religions. In every case, Kraemer reveals the connections between the social constraints under which women lived, and their religious beliefs and practices. Women's religious devotion often reflected and reinforced social definitions of women in terms of their relationships to men, as daughters, wives, sisters and mothers. Yet religions such as the ecstatic worship of Dionysos (where women periodically abandoned husbands, children and social responsibilities for nocturnal mountain rites), enabled women to find increased autonomy and female community, at least temporarily. The relationship between female autonomy, sexuality and religion emerges as a persistent theme. In antiquity, the body was associated with the female: soul and spirit with the male. Analyzing the monastic Jewish Therapeutae and various Christian communities, Kraemer demonstrates the paradoxical liberation which women achieved by rejection of sexuality, the body and the female. In the epilogue, Kraemer pursues the disturbing implications such findings have for contemporary women. Based on epitaphs and public inscriptions, letters and personal documents, references in literary works, and feminist and anthropological studies, Her Share of the Blessings is an insightful work that goes beyond the limitations of previous scholarship to provide a more accurate portrait of Jewish, Christian and pagan women in the Greco-Roman world.
Comments:
Moogugore
Kraemer's treatise closely looks at the restrictions and roles of women in the religious sphere in classical Greece, Rome and in the early Church. It is illuminating. In the classical west, the place of women has always been restricted, the higher one's social status the more controlled her life. This was true in the religious sphere, as well. Kraemer begins her study of these roles by introducing readers to Mary Douglas' grid of group classifications (Implicit Meanings (Mary Douglas: Collected Works) which serves as the template for Kraemer's examination.

With this foundation laid, the place of women and worship in ancient Greece is discussed. The metaphor of Demeter and Persephone to Hades as example of women's relationship to men (daughters leaving the household to become wives and mothers) and the cult of Adonis (as a way to safely mock the social dominance of men) was of particular interest - while I was familiar with the stories, I had never thought of them in this way before. I was less enthralled with her examination of women in ancient Rome and their roles in Roman society. Kraemer really hit her stride, I think, when she discussed women in the Judeo-Christian traditions of the early 1st - 3rd centuries CE. In fact it was for this topic that I purchased her book. Kraemer essentially argues that as the early Church grew and spread, there was a conflict within early Christians over what the role and place of women in the Church should be - this, in turn, the product of the societies from which these converts came and their perspectives on the place and role of women within religion prior to conversion: some communities demanding that women conform to more strictly gendered norms (according to Greco-Roman values), others to a more egalitarian view of gender.

As the Church grew and became more dogmatic, heirarchal and increased pressure to conform, the Greco-Roman values were adopted. This, Kraemer argues, is the cause behind Christianity's position towards women in the clergy (until recently), and towards women in general. To quite an extent, Kraemer shares the same historical causation of the Church's attitude towards women as Torjesen (When Women Were Priests: Women's Leadership in the Early Church and the Scandal of Their Subordination in the Rise of Christianity), albiet with a broader historical perspective. Both are worthy of consideration for anyone interested in the history of the early Church or women's history.

Llbery
This is not a novel. It is a scholarly survey, meant for the general reading public, however, of ancient Mediterranean women's participation in various aspects of religion. It covers Judaism, Christianity, and Greek/Roman religion, as well as some other civilizations' religious practices. Given the scope, it's quite specific and detailed, which makes it an excellent way to introduce yourself to the variations in ancient religious practice as seen through the lens of gender. Highly recommended--I also recommend Kraemer's other, extensive work on the topic of women's roles in ancient religions.

Efmprof
great book for examination of ancient women's religions and how they are reflected in the practices of today. Some undergraduate students may find this book challenging. It is refreshingly academic even for a person who is not a religion professor or major.

Cashoutmaster
It was a good book for college. Thank you.

elektron
A well-researched account of devout women in Judeo-Christian tradition, their gifts to religion, and the restrictions placed on those gifts. Kraemer compares developments, both within and between regional churches. In many areas, Kraemer shows, women never lost their right to serve as teachers and deaconesses. As Archbishop John Chrysosthom of Constantinople explained (around the year 400), the New Testament clearly encouraged women to teach, and even to teach males. Obviously it took women to teach other women in their quarters. And if the church forbade females to instruct men, how could a Christian woman ever bring her male relatives to Christ? (Chrysostham,, "First Homily on `Salute Priscilla and Aquila,'" cited p. 188). As Chrysosthom spoke, he perhaps bore in mind a famous mother from central Turkey named Emmelia, whose sons included two major saints of the Eastern Church -- Basil of Caesarea, and Gregory of Nyassa. Emmilia's sons certainly proclaimed their debt to her. And we may wonder how many Christian teachers ever raised up better students than this woman.

With attention to step-by-step increments, Kraemer measures the growing restrictions on women's devotion. Where male leaders tried to stop females from serving the sacred meal, on suspicion they might be menstruating and pollute the host, the women could always hold their own ceremonies for females only. The women of Salamis (in Asia Minor) certainly did so, but then their Bishop, Epiphianus, complained of self-appointed female priests who presumed to conduct their own services:

"They attempt to undertake a deed that is irreverent and blasphemous beyond measure -- in her [Mary's] name they function as priests for women. ... For some women prepare a certain kind of little cake with four indentations, cover it with a fine linen veil on a solemn day of the year, and on certain days they set forth the bread and offer it in the name of Mary." (p. 166.)

Kraemer follows this theme northward as Christianity spread into Europe, moving into regions with ancient traditions of reverence for local holy women. In these areas, local priests often treated support from female leaders as a blessing rather than a corruption. Therefore, in 494, Roman Pope Gelasius felt he must castigate the overly permissive priests of Lucania (Portugal):

"As we have learned to our anger, such a contempt for the divine truths has set in that even women, it has been reported, serve at the holy altars. And everything that is exclusively entrusted to the service of men has been carried out by the sex that has no right to it." (p. 132.)

In detail and sensitivity the book is very illuminating. It gives a history-long overview, showing how great a role the mothers and daughters of Western religion have played.

-author of Correcting Jesus

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