pbstudio
e-Book Devils (The World's Classics) download

e-Book Devils (The World's Classics) download

by Fedor M. Dostoevsky,Michael R. Katz

ISBN: 0192818503
ISBN13: 978-0192818508
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press; New Ed edition (June 18, 1992)
Pages: 792
Category: History and Criticism
Subategory: Literature

ePub size: 1903 kb
Fb2 size: 1365 kb
DJVU size: 1101 kb
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 955
Other Formats: mbr lrf lrf txt

This item:Devils (Oxford World's Classics) by Michael R. Katz Paperback £. 8. The Devils' is Dostoevsky's reactionary novel. He had little truck with the radical intellectuals springing up around Russia, and his contempt for them and their ideals is portrayed in this book.

This item:Devils (Oxford World's Classics) by Michael R. Only 8 left in stock (more on the way). Memoirs from the House of the Dead (Oxford World's Classics) by Fyodor Dostoevsky Paperback £. 9. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). The title comes from a biblical story in which a devil is cast out from a possessed man and enters a herd of swine, who are then driven to destruction.

Demons is a novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky, first published in the journal The Russian Messenger in 1871–72. It is considered one of the four masterworks written by Dostoevsky after his return from Siberian exile, along with Crime and Punishment (1866),. It is considered one of the four masterworks written by Dostoevsky after his return from Siberian exile, along with Crime and Punishment (1866), The Idiot (1869) and The Brothers Karamazov (1880). Demons is a social and political satire, a psychological drama, and large scale tragedy.

Michael M. Katz has 74 books on Goodreads, and is currently reading Do Unto Others by Jeff Abbott, A Death In Vienna . They will not be notified. Katz has 74 books on Goodreads, and is currently reading Do Unto Others by Jeff Abbott, A Death In Vienna by Daniel Silva, and The Lager Queen. Mor. ichael M. Katz’s Bookshelves. currently-reading‎ (44). to-read‎ (3). Stats Mor. Katz is Currently Reading. Michael M.

Oxford World's Classics Audio Guides. Best romantic novels of all time. The Paperback of the The Insulted and Injured by Fyodor Dostoevsky, Fyodor M. Dostoevsky at Barnes & Noble. What others are saying. Fyodor Dostoevsky - The Insulted and Injured.

Starr Professor Emeritus of Russian and East Eur. Studies. Dostoevsky: The Brothers Karamazov Long recognized as a pinnacle of literary art and a canonical work of Western culture, Dostoevsky’s masterpiece, The Brothers Karamazov (1880) was the Russian author’s final towering achievement that sums up his life and work.

Dostoevsky compares infectious radicalism to the devils that drove the Gadarene swine over the precipice in his vision of a society possessed by demonic creatures that produce devastating delusions of rationality. Dostoevsky is at his most imaginatively humorous in "Devils": the novel is full of buffoonery and grotesque comedy. This new translation by Michael Katz includes the chapter "Stavrogin's Confession" which was initially considered to be too shocking to print.

Oxford World's Classics. Devils, also known in English as The Possessed and The Demons, was first published in 1871-2. The third of Dostoevsky's five major. Dostoevsky compares infectious radicalism to the devils that drove the Gadarene swine over the precipice in his vision of a society possessed by demonic creatures that produce devastating delusions of rationality. Dostoevsky is at his most imaginatively humorous in Devils: the novel is full of buffoonery and grotesque comedy.

Fyodor Dostoevsky, Michael R. Katz

Fyodor Dostoevsky, Michael R. Katz. So essential is Crime and Punishment (1866) to global literature and to our understanding of Russia that it was one of the three books Edward Snowden, while confined to the Moscow airport, was given to help him absorb the culture. In a work that best embodies the existential dilemmas of man's will to power, an impoverished student, sees himself as extraordinary and therefore free to commit crimes. English translators have struggled with excessive literalism and no translation is felicitous to the literary nuances of the original prose.

The third of Dostoevsky's five major novels, Devils (1871-2), also known as The Possessed, is at once a powerful political tract and a profound study of atheism, depicting the disarray that follows the appearance of a band of modish radicals in a small provincial town. This new translation includes the chapter "Stavrogin's confession," initially censored by Dostoevsky's publisher.
Comments:
Saithinin
I do not know what my review can add to the Brothers Karamazov, but I will put in a few of my words. I have now read this book six times through and every time I am simply amazed at the complexity of vision that Dostoevsky brought to the page. My copy of the book is littered with page numbers written in the margins that connect the dots between all of the recurring scenes, ideas, images, phrases, and philosophies. It has taken years of sustained thought to be able to draw all of these connections, which makes it somewhat unbelievable that Dostoevsky was able to write it in the time frame that he did. Because of this, though, I have found this translation to be the only reasonable choice for the serious student. Many earlier translations ironed out potentially awkward phrasings, and thereby destroyed the parallelism that was being masterfully established.

I have shed so many tears on the pages of my copy of this book that I am surprised it is still holding up as well as it is. There is a sensitivity and beauty to this text that I have never been able to find anywhere else, even in other works by Dostoevsky. It is, quite simply, the most masterful examination of agape (active love), faith, and justice, and redemption that I have ever encountered in my life, in philosophy, history, literature, film, or otherwise. There are no words to offer that can capture how profoundly this book has changed me for the better.

Gna
Before you dedicate many hours to reading this masterpiece, you must be sure you select the appropriate translation for your reading style. The Pevear translation - although highly acclaimed - may make it difficult for most readers to grasp the essence of this beautiful story, and therefore I would almost always recommend the McDuff version ahead of the Pevear.

The Brothers Karamazov presents the same challenge for every English translator; namely, Dostoevsky took pride in creating distinct voices and syntax for each of his characters, and most translations have sacrificed the syntax and voicing to make it more readable - in the process losing much of the tone of each character. Pevear's translation is known for being the truest to the original, as it replicates the syntax with an almost academic precision. However, in being so true to the syntax and voicing, Pevear leaves sentence structures that are so unfamiliar-sounding to the native English speaker as to be disruptive. Many times as I read this translation I found myself jolted out of the flow of reading because the phrasing felt so awkward. As an example of a difficult sentence:

Pevear: "These occasions were almost morbid: most depraved, and, in his sensuality, often as cruel as a wicked insect, Fyodor Pavlovich at times suddenly felt in himself, in his drunken moments, a spiritual fear, a moral shock, that almost, so to speak, resounded physically in his soul." Compare that to

McDuff "These were instances that almost seemed to involve some morbid condition: most depraved, and in his voluptuous lust often brutal, like an evil insect, Fyodor Pavlovich would on occasion suddenly experience within himself, in his drunken moments, a sense of spiritual terror and moral concussion that echoed almost physically, as it were, within his soul".

This is a good example of the tradeoffs each translator makes. Generally: Pevear's is tight, precise, uses simple language and is truest to the original and punchy sentence structure. It requires a high tolerance for odd syntax. McDuff's uses a broader vocabulary (e.g. "moral concussion"), but his flow/ear is much more natural to most English speakers. The sacrifice is that McDuff uses probably 5%-10% more words, but I personally believe these additions make it far more readable. It is still generally true to the sentence structure, but by taking a quarter step away from the purist version, he sheds much more light on the underlying text than Pevear.

Based on research, other reviewers and my own experience: if you are familiar with Russian, Pevear is for you. If you value precision, read for words instead of flow, or are better able to tolerate difficult phrasing than difficult vocabulary, then Pevear is for you. If you are more comfortable with a wider repertoire of words, and typically read with a background sense of the "flow" of each sentence, I believe McDuff will be far more readable while maintaining all the essence of the original work.

Zyangup
Most people know that The Brothers Karamazov is an amazing novel, so I will only be criticizing the translation; however, I haven't read any other translations to verify my knowledge on the subject, and I would suggest going getting samples of different translations in order to best suit your needs.
The Richard Peaver & Larissa Volokhonsky translation of The Brothers Karamazov is good. It's being marketed as the best, but it really isn't. There is not a 'best' translation of Dostoyevsky, or really, any other Russian author I've researched; no, there isn't a 'best' translation of a book that I know of. To my understanding the Peaver translations usually stick incredibly close to the original source material, which is a double edged sword; most people want a translation that doesn't loose something or other in translation. This one is very close to doing so, but as I said it's a double edged sword; they leave in the syntax, and a very foreign syntax at that. This can cause problems for a casual reader, but it wasn't a problem for me. What really matters is the readers personal preference. I will add the first sentence of the P&V, McDuff, and Garnett translations to see which one you'd most like:

"Alexei Fyodorovich Karamazov was the third son of a land owner from our district, Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov, well known is his own day (and still remembered among us) because of his dark and tragic death, which happened exactly thirteen years ago and which I shall speak of in its proper place." - P&V
"Aleksey Fyodorovich Karamazov was the third son of a landowner in our district, Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov, so noted in his time (and even now still recollected among us) for his tragic and fishy death, which occurred just thirteen years ago and which I shall report in its proper context." - McDuff
"Alexey Fyodorovich Karamazov was the third son of Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov, a landowner well known in our district in his own day, and still remembered among us owing to his gloomy and tragic death, which happened thirteen years ago, and which I shall describe in its proper place." - Garnett

Moving on to the edition I have. It's ISBN is 978-0374528379, but it is the best selling edition as of 8/1/2017; you probably won't have any trouble finding it. This paperback is a great durable edition. I kept it in my backpack for school each day for basically the entire second semester without too much serious wear (check the photos to judge yourself). The font is big enough to read well without straining your eyes... or at least it was for me. It's still holding together nicely is what I'm trying to say. The binding is glued, too; if you didn't know. This edition has a cover in which I will describe as rough-soft feeling; I enjoyed holding it in my hands.

Finally, sorry for the poor camera quality. The soda can piece is there to show how big the text is in comparison. The torn piece on the back is from a mishap I am accountable for not the book, although it says something about the books durability; it happened near the end of my usage with it.

e-Book Crime and Punishment download

Crime and Punishment epub fb2

by Fyodor Dostoevsky,Constance Garnett
ISBN: 0553101560
ISBN13: 978-0553101560
Subcategory: Classics
e-Book Dostoevsky download

Dostoevsky epub fb2

by John Arthur Thomas Lloyd
ISBN: 0838320996
ISBN13: 978-0838320990
language: English
Subcategory: History and Criticism
e-Book New Dostoevsky Letters download

New Dostoevsky Letters epub fb2

by F. M. Dostoevsky
ISBN: 083831824X
ISBN13: 978-0838318249
language: English
e-Book Crime and Punishment by Fyodor M. Dostoevsky, Fiction, Classics download

Crime and Punishment by Fyodor M. Dostoevsky, Fiction, Classics epub fb2

by Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky,Constance Garnett
ISBN: 1592246311
ISBN13: 978-1592246311
language: English
Subcategory: History and Criticism
ISBN: 0345481267
ISBN13: 978-0345481269
language: English
Subcategory: Short Stories and Anthologies
e-Book The Adolescent (Vintage Classics) download

The Adolescent (Vintage Classics) epub fb2

by Fyodor Dostoevsky,Richard Pevear,Larissa Volokhonsky
ISBN: 0375719008
ISBN13: 978-0375719004
language: English
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
ISBN: 0020657501
ISBN13: 978-0020657507
language: English
Subcategory: Philosophy
ISBN: 0701115327
ISBN13: 978-0701115326
language: English
ISBN: 1853992828
ISBN13: 978-1853992827
language: English
Subcategory: Humanities
e-Book Study in Dostoevsky download

Study in Dostoevsky epub fb2

by Vyacheslav Ivanov
ISBN: 0374500282
ISBN13: 978-0374500283
Subcategory: History and Criticism