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e-Book The Irresistible Rise of Harry Potter download

e-Book The Irresistible Rise of Harry Potter download

by Andrew Blake

ISBN: 1859846661
ISBN13: 978-1859846667
Language: English
Publisher: Verso; First Edition edition (December 12, 2002)
Pages: 120
Category: History and Criticism
Subategory: Literature

ePub size: 1708 kb
Fb2 size: 1562 kb
DJVU size: 1982 kb
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 805
Other Formats: rtf azw azw lit

Andrew Blake argues here that the Harry Potter phenomenon is a response to the decline of British power and of the publishing industry. Blake sees Harry as a symbol of "retrolution," a nostalgic view of the past transplanted into the present.

Andrew Blake argues here that the Harry Potter phenomenon is a response to the decline of British power and of the publishing industry. As to the reasons for Harry's popularity, I don't find Blake's thesis wildly convincing. As I see it, the Potter books are well written and exciting.

118 pages ; 20 cm. "Harry Potter is English, a home-counties suburban child

118 pages ; 20 cm. "Harry Potter is English, a home-counties suburban child. An orphan, oppressed and abused by the adults around him, he retreats into a fantasy world where his problems are more elemental: everyday rituals, magic spells and supercharged broomsticks with only the occasional homicidal wizard to worry about. Ironically, as Andrew Blake makes clear, .

Andrew Blake’s examination of the Harry Potter phenomenon also raises serious .

Andrew Blake’s examination of the Harry Potter phenomenon also raises serious questions about the condition of the publishing industry, the state of bookselling and filmmaking, and the ways in which the Potter consumer campaign has changed our ideas about literature and reading. Blake reflects on how these connections, while drawn up in Britain, act as a template for Harry Potter’s international success. Blake's book is filled with moments like these, where he simply fails to take actions in the context to which they occur in the book for the sake of making his argument plausible.

Andrew Blake’s most popular book is The Irresistible Rise of Harry Potter. Tolkien: A Beginner's Guide by. Andrew Blake.

This book looks at the cultural and political timing that seems to have made Harry the irresistible darling of the literacy efforts in the UK and since in many respects those things are duplicated in the US, voila, Harry is irresistible there also. This year's top sellers. The Hobbit, or There and Back Again.

As the British state begins to unravel, and journalists compete to pronounce on the death of Britain, a schoolboy from suburban Surrey who lives for most of the year in a semi-parallel universe becomes the most popular figure in contemporary world literature everyone else does. Harry Potter is an orphan, oppressed and abused by the adults around him, who retreats into a fantasy world. But ironically, as Andrew Blake makes clear, .

And of course, I don't own Harry Potter and Naruto or any of their characters. That was one of THE BEST novels that combined Harry Potter and Naruto With a well thought character and background creating a masterpiece that leave the Faithful readers happy until the end. Thank you for the great Works.

This caused initial consternation on my part since numerous biblical passages prohibit any involvement in the supernatural and the occult and implore us to protect children from exposure to them.

Now read on, everyone else does It was written for young readers to enjoy. The book includes the fictional characters Harry and Harry Potter.

Now read on, everyone else does. The irresistible rise of Harry Potter by Andrew Blake has not been rated for age or fabulousness yet on TheBookseekers. It was written for young readers to enjoy. The subject areas covered by this book include History.

Crowning the King: Harry Potter and the Construction of Authority. The Ivory Tower and Harry Potter: Perspectives on a Literary Phenomenon. The second two books are littered with references to giggling girls Heilman 226. Victor Valley College. ENGLISH 101 - Spring 2012. Columbia: U of Missouri P, 2002. 11 Nikolajeva, Maria. Harry Potter-A Return to the Romantic Hero. Most women and an overwhelming majority of the accused witches were women were.

As the British state begins to unravel, and as journalists compete to pronounce on the death of Britain, a schoolboy from suburban Surrey who lives for most of the year in a semi-parallel universe becomes the most popular figure in contemporary world literature. Now read on – everyone else does...Harry Potter is English, a home-counties suburban child. An orphan, oppressed and abused by the adults around him, he retreats into a fantasy world where his problems are more elemental; everyday rituals, magic spells and supercharged broomsticks with only the occasional homicidal wizard to worry about. Ironically, as Andrew  Blake makes clear, J. K. Rowling rescues her character through the reinvention of that apex of class privilege, the English public school, a literary conceit that problematises Harry Potter’s status as a role model and raises important social questions about the state of education in Tony Blair’s Britain.Andrew Blake’s examination of the Harry Potter phenomenon also raises serious questions about the condition of the publishing industry, the state of bookselling and filmmaking, and the ways in which the Potter consumer campaign has changed our ideas about literature and reading. Blake reflects on how these connections, while drawn up in Britain, act as a template for Harry Potter’s international success.
Comments:
Burking
First of all, I only rated this one star because I can't rate it none. Secondly, I'm glad I bought this second hand because its about 1/4 inch thick.

Thirdly, this is not a good book. Like the previous reviewer stated, Blake seems to be trying to answer why Harry Potter is so popular, but he never really does. He provides a whole bunch of statistics like The Labour Party came into power in the same year Harry was published. So what? This isn't enough. (Not to mention that Fudge has often been called a parody of Tony Blair). He cites a lot of coincidences and contemporaneous events, but doesn't do much with them. Many of his arguments are very thin. He uses the example of Harry relaxing by playing Qudditch in a scene from Book Four to argue that in the books "Retail therapy and sport substitute for emotional contact." Clearly this guy has no clue what he's talking about. One wonders if it is not Blake who has the problem with emotional contact--obviously, he could not emotionally connect with the books.

Which brings up the main reason why this book is so bad--Blake never took the time to read the books thoroughly and analyze them thoroughly. I got the impression he had casually read through them maybe one time. He never analyzes them beyond a casual recital of the plot. The books are used as mere examples of his thin social and political theories, with a cold, Professor Binns-like indifference.

His attitude is insensitive, condescending, cynical, and patronizing, to the point that one wonders why in the world he wrote this book at all? I can only think it was to try and cash in on the phenomenon. Why, for example, is the lettering on the spine exactly like the "magical" lettering of the American versions?

I would advise you NOT to waste your money. Its only 116 SMALL pages with LARGE print.

I would recommend The Ivory Tower and Harry Potter instead. That is full of interesting ideas and its well worth the price.

Landarn
I would rate this as a tie for the most interesting book on this phenomenon of those I have read so far. This book looks at the cultural and political timing that seems to have made Harry the irresistible darling of the literacy efforts in the UK and since in many respects those things are duplicated in the US, voila, Harry is irresistible there also.

Gamba
Andrew Blake argues here that the Harry Potter phenomenon is a response to the decline of British power and of the publishing industry. Blake sees Harry as a symbol of "retrolution," a nostalgic view of the past transplanted into the present.

As to the reasons for Harry's popularity, I don't find Blake's thesis wildly convincing. As I see it, the Potter books are well written and exciting. I find it a relief myself to read about Harry's magical problems rather than the all-too-real ones I face every day. Other than that, the main force I see operating in Harry's success is the one no one can sensibly explain: the power of fad.

On the other hand, Blake is correct that Britain's power has declined. I suppose it's possible that Harry Potter may relate to this in some way. Unfortunately, Blake doesn't take this analysis very far. I think retrolution may well be an unavoidable part of the future in all the developed countries. Although Blake doesn't mention this, Britain's past dominance in the world depended largely on the Industrial Revolution. The Industrial Revolution in turn came about because fossil fuels were harnessed to do work. Britain's decline began when her coal supplies began to run out. The North Sea oil was a shot in the arm for Britain, but it appears that also is coming to an end. Hubbert's oil peak is likely to cause widespread disruption in developed countries in the next few years. Britain certainly will not be spared these problems. One result will be a general shift back to a slower, more local style of life--in other words, retrolution. For more on this, see Kunstler's book "The Long Emergency."The Long Emergency: Surviving the End of Oil, Climate Change, and Other Converging Catastrophes of the Twenty-First Century

Brightcaster
i've read this book twice, and, while much of the social and cultural facts, discussions and conclusions are interesting--even fascinating--i cannot say that the author has determined why harry potter has become so internationally popular, and so popular across social levels.

nevertheless, i did find it worth reading twice. on the other hand, i think it also proves that it is not possible to analyze the reasons for a cultural phenomenon.

Onnell
This is an excellent and subtle, but unfortunately too brief (hence four stars), overview of the Harry Potter craze. The main question Blake seeks to answer is: why now? Why and how did the Harry Potter series become so popular and why now? He situates the books in historical context--easier said than done. There was much going on in English culture and education that contributed to the books' success. Beginning in the mid-90s, Blake looks less at the books' possible past textual sources and spends more time exploring the books' contemporary cultural sources. I'm currently teaching a university course with _Azkaban_ as a text and may assign readings from Blake's book as secondary reading, both as overview of what came before and as an example of how to read carefully and respect a text and its attendant complications.

AGAD
This author along with all the other HP critics overthink the Harry Potter phenomenom. What is going on inthe county has a minimal effect on what fiction people read, especially for grade schoolers.

People liek the idea that there is a world nobody knows about. It's not going to be complex literature because its aimed toward younger readers. JK Rowling has a good plot and a gift for writing.

Thozius
Isn't the Harry Potter a book series for children? Isn't it a fantasy series? It's just harmless fun, so leave it alone. Once again a puritanical conservative decides what's best for others and is upset because some people enjoy something he doesn't. Let it go already.

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