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e-Book The Brown Fairy Book download

e-Book The Brown Fairy Book download

by Andrew Lang

ISBN: 1404300511
ISBN13: 978-1404300514
Language: English
Publisher: IndyPublish (January 30, 2002)
Pages: 258
Category: Mythology and Folk Tales
Subategory: Literature

ePub size: 1109 kb
Fb2 size: 1220 kb
DJVU size: 1660 kb
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 286
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The Langs' Fairy Books are a series of 25 collections of true and fictional stories for children published between 1889 and 1913 by Andrew Lang and his wife, Leonora Blanche Alleyne.

The Langs' Fairy Books are a series of 25 collections of true and fictional stories for children published between 1889 and 1913 by Andrew Lang and his wife, Leonora Blanche Alleyne. The best known books of the series are the 12 collections of fairy tales also known as Andrew Lang's "Coloured" Fairy Books or Andrew Lang's Fairy Books of Many Colors. In all, the volumes feature 798 stories, besides the 153 poems in The Blue Poetry Book.

The brown fairy book. The stories in this Fairy Book come from all quarters of the world. The Brown Fairy Book. First published in 1904. ISBN 978-1-62011-278-6. For example, the adventures of 'Ball-Carrier and the Bad One' are told by Red Indian grandmothers to Red Indian children who never go to school, nor see pen and ink. 'The Bunyip' is known to even more uneducated little ones, running about with no clothes at all in the bush, in Australia.

Andrew Lang, a Scotsman, was a literary critic, novelist, poet, and a contributor to the field of anthropology. The thirty-two stories in this book come from more exotic traditions that the previous Colored Fairy Books. In this book, tales are taken from India, Brazil, Persia, Lapnad, the American Indians, Australian Bushmen, and African Kaffirs. автор: Эндрю Лэнг (Andrew Lang). The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Brown Fairy Book, by Andrew Lang. This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever

The Brown Fairy Book. Читать на английском и переводить текст. This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at ww. utenberg. Title: The Brown Fairy Book. Illustrator: H. J. Ford. Release Date: February 6, 2010.

Электронная книга "The Brown Fairy Book", Andrew Lang. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Brown Fairy Book" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Andrew Lang’s coloured Fairy Books constitute a twelve-volume series of fairy tale collections. Although Lang didn’t collect the stories from the oral tradition himself, he can make claim to the first English translation of many, which are often cited as inspiration to . Tolken and his Middle-Earth novels. 1. The Blue Fairy Book (1889).

Fox and the Lapp ' from the very north of Europe, where it is dark for half the year and day-light for the other half.

You can also read the full text online using our ereader. Fox and the Lapp ' from the very north of Europe, where it is dark for half the year and day-light for the other half. The Lapps are a people not fond of soap and water, and very much given to art magic.

Comments:
Faebei
“The Brown Fairy Book,” published in 1904, is the ninth of twelve collected fairy story books that were researched, translated and compiled by Andrew Lang (1844-1912) and his wife, Leonora Blanche Alleyne Lang. Andrew Lang, a Scotsman, was a literary critic, novelist, poet, and a contributor to the field of anthropology.

The thirty-two stories in this book come from more exotic traditions that the previous Colored Fairy Books. In this book, tales are taken from India, Brazil, Persia, Lapnad, the American Indians, Australian Bushmen, and African Kaffirs. Included are “The Sister of the Sun,” “Rubezahl,” “Kisa the Cat,” “The Husband of the Rat’s Daughter,” “The Cunning Hare,” among others.

This was a delightful book to read. The stories were different and had a different feel that the earlier collections by Lang, and I looked forward to reading each one. Not many endings were odd, nor were they predictable.

inetserfer
The 12 Fairy books edited by Andrew Lang in the late 19th and early 20th centuries are classics. When I was a child I read them all. Copiously illustrated by by different artists, they are the most complete assortment of folk tales from around the world ever collected. Each one is titled with a different color: Blue, Green, Red, Violet, Gray, Brown, Orange, etc. What can be said of one, can be said of all.
When I realized my grandchildren had never heard of them, I decided to get as many as I could together and managed through Amazon to purchase the entire dozen (although Crimson has yet to come in.) Some of the titles are a bit shopworn, but so would they be if they had been sitting in one's library since 1900. Highly recommended. The real deal.

POFOD
In the late 19th century, historian, scholar, and anthropologist, Andrew Lang, began publishing collections of fairy tales from around the world. The first volume was `The Blue Fairy Book' published in 1887. Lang was not a true ethnologist, like the German Brothers Grimm. He was far more the `translator' than collector of tales from the source, stories transcribed from being told by people to whom the tales were passed down by word of mouth. In fact, many stories in his first volume, such as Rumpelstiltskin; Snow White; Sleeping Beauty; Cinderella; and Hansel and Gretel were translated from Grimm's books of fairy tales. Some of his `fairy tales' were even `copied from relatively recent fantasy fiction, such as A Voyage to Lilliput, the first of the four episodes in Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels.
My inspiration for commenting Lang's series of fairy tale books is for the sheer quantity of tales, the wonderful woodcut illustrations, some few of which may have become almost as popular as the tales (although not quite in the same league as Sir John Tenniel's illustrations for Lewis Carroll's great fantasies), and the fact that I had these when I was young.
With twelve of these books, with between 30 and 36 stories in each book, this gives one about 400 different stories. If I were to recommend anything as standard equipment at a grandparents' house, it would be a complete set of these books.
Needless to say, there are a few `warnings' to accompany books assembled over 100 years ago. You will encounter a fair number of words with which even an adult may be unfamiliar, let alone a five year old. For example, on the second page of The Princess Mayblossom in The Red Fairy Book, a character puts sulfur in a witch's porridge. This requires at least three explanations. What is sulfur, what is porridge, and why is sulfur in porridge such a bad thing. More difficult still is when a prince entered the town on a white horse which `pranced and caracoled to the sound of the trumpets'. In 19th century London, caracoling (making half turns to the right and the left) was probably as common and as well known as `stepping on the gas' is today. But, if you're a grandparent, that's half the fun, explaining new words and ideas to the young-uns.
There is another `danger' which may require just a bit more explanation, although in today's world of crime dramas on TV, I'm not sure that most kids are already totally immune to being shocked by death and dead bodies. In these stories, lots of people and creatures get killed in very unpleasant ways, and lots of very good people and creatures suffer in very unpleasant ways. It's ironic that the critics in Lang's own time felt the stories were 'unreality, brutality, and escapism to be harmful for young readers, while holding that such stories were beneath the serious consideration of those of mature age'. The success of a whole library of Walt Disney feature length cartoons based on these stories is a testament to how well they work with children. But do be warned, Uncle Walt did clean things up a bit. Lang's versions hold back on very little that was ugly and unpleasant in some of these stories.
The down side to the great quantity of stories is that even when some come from very different parts of the world, there is a remarkable amount of overlap in theme, plot, and characters. But by the time you get to another story of a beautiful young girl mistreated by a stepmother, it will have been several month since you read Cinderella or the Little Glass Slipper in The Blue Fairy Book. The other side of the coin is that you can play the game of trying to recall what that other story was with a similar theme.
There is one very big word of caution about buying these books through Amazon or a similar on line outlet. I stopped counting when I got to twelve different editions of The Blue Fairy Book, or a volume including several of these books. Not all of these editions have the original woodcuts and even worse, not all have a table of contents and introduction. The one publisher which has all twelve volumes is by Dover. Other publishers, such as Flying Chipmunk Publishing (yes, that's it's name) also have all the original illustrations, table of contents, and introduction, but I'm not certain that publisher has all twelve volumes. Dover most certainly does, as I just bought all twelve of them from Amazon.
While I suspect these stories may have been `old hat' for quite some time, it may be that with the popularity of Lord of the Rings, the Narnia stories, and the Harry Potter stories, all of which have their share of suffering and death, that these may be in for a revival. Again, the main attraction is that for relatively little money and space, Grammy and Grandad get a great resource for bonding with children.

EXIBUZYW
Andrew Lang (1844-1912) wrote a number of books of fairy tales and differentiated each from the other by color; for example, this one is green, another is pink, another is blue, and others yellow, grey, brown, and lilac. The book contains 32 tales from many lands. He states that many of the tales were told by grandmothers to children who never went to school and who, unfortunately, never will, children in India, Africa, Persia, South America, Australia, and other countries. The stories, he writes, show the advantage of good manners and pleasant behavior. He admits that some stories were revised to omit elements that the "outlandish natives" liked, to make them palatable for "white people." This prejudice was shown in other Lang books.

Although from many foreign lands, the stories contain many of the same ingredients in all fairy tales. What the Rose did to the Cypress? is an example. There is a king who has three very handsome sons. The magic numbers three and seven occur frequently in the tale. One of the sons meets a mysterious man who had seven sons. He tells the prince how each of his sons in turn heard about a very beautiful princess who agreed to marry the man who could answer her riddle, "What the rose did to the cypress?" If the suitor fails to answer the riddle correctly, he is beheaded. Each of his seven sons tried to answer the riddle, failed and was killed. The man said that he has mourned them ever since their deaths.

The prince, as happens in fairy tales, falls in love with the princess, even as the seven sons did, without ever seeing her. He goes to the princess, offers an answer, which is wrong, and is beheaded. When his second brother hears what happened, he also falls in love, with the same result. Then the third brother also falls in love, goes to the princess' palace, but decides not to try to answer until he is sure he knows the real solution.

The rest of the story relates his many adventures during his search. He encounters many beautiful women, including magicians, who fall in love with him because of his beauty. He promises each that he will marry them if they help him. Each offers some help. He comes to a land of demons and fairies. He is changed by magic into a deer. A three hundred year old servant woman tries to catch the deer. Will he be successful? Will he marry any of the beautiful girls who he promised to marry? Will he discover the answer to the riddle? What is the answer? What will he do to the princess? Will he take revenge upon her for murdering his brothers or will he succumb to her beauty and marry her?

Longitude Temporary
Fairy tales! Always fantastic and fun. Highly recommend.

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