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e-Book Cold Heart, Cruel Hand: A Novel Of Hereward The Wake And The Fen Rebellion Of 1070-1071 download

e-Book Cold Heart, Cruel Hand: A Novel Of Hereward The Wake And The Fen Rebellion Of 1070-1071 download

by Laurence J. Brown

ISBN: 0952870894
ISBN13: 978-0952870890
Language: English
Publisher: Paul Mould Pub (November 1, 2004)
Pages: 394
Subategory: Literature

ePub size: 1972 kb
Fb2 size: 1159 kb
DJVU size: 1277 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 552
Other Formats: rtf lit mbr docx

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Spring 1070: William the Conqueror has been King of England for three years but his reign has not been a peaceful on. Book in the Norman Conquest Series). by Laurence J. Brown.

Spring 1070: William the Conqueror has been King of England for three years but his reign has not been a peaceful one. The Saxon people have risen up against th. .

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Cold heart, cruel hand. a novel of Hereward the Wake and the Fen Rebellion of 1070-1071. Published 2004 by Empire Pub. Service, Paul Mould Pub. in Studio City, Ca, . Written in English. Anglo-Saxons, Fiction, History, Insurgency, Outlaws.

Spring 1070: William the Conqueror has been King of England for three years, but his reign has not been a peaceful on. His name is Hereward the Wake, and soon he is joined in bloody conflict with the Conqueror as the two men fight for supremacy of the land.

Spring 1070: William the Conqueror has been King of England for three years, but his reign has not been a peaceful one. Rebellion has followed bloody rebellion as the Saxon people have risen up against the tyranny of their Norman oppressors. With ruthless efficiency the Conqueror has crushed each one with shocking brutality. Into this cauldron comes the last of Harold's housecarls, Ranulf Redbeard and his family, determined to join the Wake in his fight for freedom.

Cold Heart, Cruel Hand: A Novel Of Hereward The Wake and The Fen Rebellion of 1070-1071" by Laurence J.The Fens - The Fens, also known as the Fenland, is a geographic area in eastern England, in the United Kingdom

Cold Heart, Cruel Hand: A Novel Of Hereward The Wake and The Fen Rebellion of 1070-1071" by Laurence J. Brown, pub. 2004 "Brainbiter: The Saga of Hereward the Wake" by Jack Ogden, pub. 2007 "The Legend of Hereward the Wake" by Mike Ripley, pub. 2007 "Hereward the Wake", by Charles Kingsley (see below for text from Project Guttenburg). The Fens - The Fens, also known as the Fenland, is a geographic area in eastern England, in the United Kingdom.

COLD HEART, CRUEL HAND: A NOVEL OF HEREWARD WAKE AND FEN By Laurence J. Mint by Laurence J. Mint. Mint Condition! Quick &Free Shipping. From United Kingdom by Sitwell, Osbert Paperback.

Hereward the Wake: Last of the English (also published as Hereward, the Last of the English) is an 1866 novel by Charles Kingsley

Hereward the Wake: Last of the English (also published as Hereward, the Last of the English) is an 1866 novel by Charles Kingsley. It tells the story of Hereward, a historical Anglo-Saxon figure who led resistance against the Normans from a base in Ely surrounded by fen land. It was Kingsley's last historical novel, and was instrumental in elevating Hereward into an English folk-hero.

Cold Heart, Cruel Hand: a novel of Hereward the Wake (2004) is a novel by Laurence J. Hereward the Wake makes a significant appearance in Keeper of the Crystal Spring (1998) by Naomi & Deborah Baltuck, a historical romance/adventure set in a predominantly Saxon community 20 years after the Battle of Hastings. An Endless Exile (2004), by Mary Lancaster, is a historical novel based on Hereward's life. Hereward is portrayed as a prototype Robin Hood, but also as a drug-taking, psychopathic arsonist, in Mike Ripley's novel The Legend of Hereward the Wake (2007).

1070-1071: Hereward the Wake and the rebellion are Ely. The Danish fleet sails to East Anglia and sets up on theĀ . The Danish fleet sails to East Anglia and sets up on the Isle of Ely, in the middle of the Fens. The Fens are a marshy region, and the Isle of Ely, itself, in 1070, is surrounded by water and swamp, making the area ideal for the Danes to defend. If William is to attack he'll need the local knowledge of safe routes through the marsh or he'll meet a sticky end. To make matters even better for the Danes, East Anglia is part of the Danelaw, so Sweyn is easily able to make alliances with the locals

Comments:
Manesenci
When I finish one book of a series I normally read a few others of a different genre before returning to that series again. However, I enjoyed The Housecarl so much I couldn't wait to find out how the hero fared in this sequel. The story follows the adventures of Ranulf Redbeard, one of King Harold's (of 1066 fame) personal body guards, in fact, the kings champion. Following the bitter defeat at Hastings Ranulf spends the next four years persecuting his vengeance against the Normans ultimately finding himself joining the group of Hereward the Wake, the last outpost of defiance against the cruel and implacable King William. Hereward's band occupy the Lincolnshire fens, a large flat and desolate swampy area, although of marginal value to the occupying Normans, it now draws the Conqueror's attention due to the need to suppress the Saxon's continuing defiant successes.
Ranulf is welcomed into the band and soon becomes a prime mover in the group's military actions. His relationship with Hereward however is less than straightforward and is an interesting sub-plot to the main story. Ranulf also falls foul of a particularly nasty Norman soldier and his personal conflict with this character is thrillingly told; indeed I was a little disappointed that this opponent was terminated a little too early in the story. But I nit-pick.
As in the first tale all the Normans, save one, are thoroughly despicable, led by the viciously cruel example of their king, William the Bastard, as he is always referred to by Ranulf. The Saxons are all duly the downtrodden but noble heroes of the hour. Needless to say, King William was never known for his reticence in ruthlessly putting down any rebellious Saxons and the result of this struggle can really be no exception. However, with no spoiler given, there is certainly the opportunity for another story here and I for one will go for it happily.

Wafi
I loved reading this account of the Fen Rebellion of 1070. I was stationed in this part of England while I was in the U.S. Air Force and enjoyed reading about several places I had been to, such as Ely. Hereward the Wake was a brave leader of the rebellion, who with a small force was able to defeat King William's army in a couple of battles in the Fen swampland. As the title suggests, King William ruled his Saxon subjects with a cruel hand and Hereward was an Anglo-Saxon nobleman, who against all odds, fought back. Laurence Brown did a nice job of describing this real-life medieval hero.

Ochach
I re-enact 1066 and this book really helped me get into the character of a 1066 Saxon Huscarl. Ranulf is a great character and the book is superbly written.

Wrathmaster
I was delighted with Mr. Brown's first book, Housecarle. I eagerly ordered this second book and if I could give it 50 stars I would. I dare say it is even better than the first - which was marvelous itself! Mr. Brown picks up the story of Ranulf, the only surviving Housecarle from King Harold's last stand in 1066, as he and his wife and young son struggle against the terrible Norman slaughter in York. Against all odds, they survive and chance brings them to the camp of Hereward the Wake. Hereward was once a nobleman himself, but displaced when William the Conqueror awarded his lands to a Norman lord and killed his only brother. Hereward had been away fighting a forgein war and did not return in time to fight in 1066. He does however put up a resistance that is inspiring, thrilling and makes a story you won't want to put down! Ranulf's personal struggle against survivor's guilt and his single-minded desire to protect his young family are equally thrilling and inspiring. Mr. Brown has created characters on the Norman side that are both vividly terrifying - the kind you love to hate, and also honorable - the kind you'd love to have known. Without giving away the story - which simply pulls you enthusiastically from page to page, I will say that Mr. Brown has taken a period of English history and masterfully captured the political, military and personal struggles that must certainly have happened much as he has imagined. I reached the last page and could have started it over again immediately. I am not ready to be finished with these characters and I desperately hope that the story has not yet come to an end. BUY THIS BOOK!!!!! You will be thrilled that you did!

Cerana
This is the story of Hereward the Wake, the last leader of the resistance against William the Conqueror. He has been stripped of his rightful lands and title by the Bastard. He continues to fight against him and seems to constantly outwit the Normans on his island of Ely in the Fens of East Anglia. He has plenty of help especially when Earl Mortar and Ranulf Redbeard join his cause.

There are many subplots going on behind the scenes and it makes the storyline that much more intriguing. There were many typos, including grammatical, spelling, editing errors but withstanding those the novel was very riveting. I would suggest if this author does any more writing he find better proofreaders & editors, etc.

While this story is based on fact it is historical "fiction." I too noticed the errors of Odo, the Bishop of Bayeux and Earl of Kent, and Robert of Mortain being described as King William's "cousins" while they were in fact his half-brothers. I'm not sure if the author did this deliberately or not.

However, it is still very much a worthwhile read and a genuine page-turner. I recommend it to anyone interested in this time period. Two other excellent novels of Hereward the Wake are "An Endless Exile" by Mary Lancaster & "Green Saxon Darkness" by Pamela Cottrel.

ISBN: 0230290833
ISBN13: 978-0230290839
language: English
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