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e-Book Erec and Enide (Chretien de Troyes Romances S) download

e-Book Erec and Enide (Chretien de Troyes Romances S) download

by Chrétien de Troyes,Burton Raffel

ISBN: 0300067712
ISBN13: 978-0300067712
Language: English
Publisher: Yale University Press; New edition edition (February 27, 1997)
Pages: 250
Category: Poetry
Subategory: Literature

ePub size: 1279 kb
Fb2 size: 1935 kb
DJVU size: 1341 kb
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 688
Other Formats: azw doc lit rtf

Chrétien de Troyes (Modern French: ; 1135?–1185?, fl. c. 1160–1191) was a French poet and trouvère known for his writing on Arthurian subjects, and for possibly originating the character of Lancelot.

Chrétien de Troyes (Modern French: ; 1135?–1185?, fl. Chrétien's works, including Erec and Enide, Lancelot, Perceval, and Yvain, represent some of the best-regarded of medieval literature. His use of structure, particularly in Yvain, has been seen as a step towards the modern novel.

Chretien de Troyes invented the Arthurian romance with Erec and Enide Curiously, EREC AND ENIDE was written by a Frenchman, Chrétien de Troyes (Troyes being ninety miles east of Paris).

Chretien de Troyes invented the Arthurian romance with Erec and Enide. It was the first of what would soon come to be a genre unto itself. Tales of King Arthur and his knights are still popular after centuries of retelling, and Chretien de Troyes is responsible for many of the stories as we know them. Erec and Enide, the earliest of his surviving works, is a story about all the things we recognize as Arthurian-honor, chivalry, love, and courage. Curiously, EREC AND ENIDE was written by a Frenchman, Chrétien de Troyes (Troyes being ninety miles east of Paris). Chrétien was a poet/troubadour who composed his works in Old French.

In the twelfth century, the French poet and troubadour Chrétien de Troyes wrote five Arthurian romances that taken together are one of the landmarks of medieval literature.

Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). In the twelfth century, the French poet and troubadour Chrétien de Troyes wrote five Arthurian romances that taken together are one of the landmarks of medieval literature. I have undertaken to read (or re-read) the Raffel translations one per month.

Chrétien's romances became the source for Arthurian tradition and .

Chrétien's romances became the source for Arthurian tradition and influenced countless other poets in England and on the Continent. Yet his swift-moving style is difficult to capture in translation, and today's English-speaking audiences remain largely unfamiliar with the pleasures of reading his poems. Burton Raffel's rendition preserves the subtlety and charm of a poem that is in turn serious, dramatic, bawdy, merry, and satiric. When Enide is kidnapped by a robber baron, Erec revives from near-death to perform a courageous rescue, and at length the two are reconciled.

Translated with an Introduction and Notes by. William w. kibler. Erec and Enide translated by. Carleton w. carroll).

But the whole s Chrétien de Troyes’ Erec and Enide, which presents the story of a knight and his beautiful love, while a story of adventure and romance, failed to interest me. Of course, there were aspects of Chrétien’s tale that were fun and amusing.

Chrétien de Troyes, (flourished 1165–80), French poet who is known as the author of five Arthurian romances : Erec ; Cligès . Chrétien was the initiator of the sophisticated courtly romance.

Chrétien de Troyes, (flourished 1165–80), French poet who is known as the author of five Arthurian romances : Erec ; Cligès ; Lancelot, ou Le Chevalier à la charrette ; Yvain, ou Le Chevalier au lion ; and Perceval, ou Le Conte du Graal. The non-Arthurian tale Guillaume d’Angleterre, based on the legend of St. Eustace, may also have been written by Chrétien. romance: Chrétien de Troyes. Deeply versed in contemporary rhetoric, he treated love casuistically and in a humorously detached fashion, bringing folklore themes and love situations together in an Arthurian world of adventure.

Chretien de Troyes (l. 1130-1190 CE) was the greatest romantic poet of his era, regarded today as the Father of Arthurian Romance (along with . Chretien is the author of five Arthurian Romances: Erec and Enide. Lancelot or the Knight of the Cart

Chretien de Troyes (l. 1130-1190 CE) was the greatest romantic poet of his era, regarded today as the Father of Arthurian Romance (along with Geoffrey. Lancelot or the Knight of the Cart. Yvain or the Knight with the Lion. Perceval or the Story of the Grail. He was the first to introduce some of the best-known aspects of the Arthurian Legends such as the affair between Lancelot and Guinevere, the Grail Quest, and Camelot as the name of Arthur’s court. Based upon details in the introductions to some of his poems, he also translated works from Latin and wrote other pieces which are now lost.

Erec and Enide - Chretien de Troyes Romances (Hardback). Burton Raffel's rendition preserves the subtlety and charm of a poem that is in turn serious, dramatic, bawdy, merry and satiric. Chretien (author), Troyes, Chretien de (author), Professor Burton Raffel (translator). Erec and Enide", the first of five surviving Arthurian romantic poems by 12th-century French poet Chretien de Troyes, narrates a chapter from the legend of King Arthur. Chretien's romances became the source for Arthurian tradition and influenced countless other poets in England and on the Continent.

Chrétien, De Troyes Chrétien, Chrétien De Troyes. Book digitized by Google from the library of Harvard University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb.

Chrétien, De Troyes Chrétien, Chrétien De Troyes You can read Erec Und Enide by Chrétien, De Troyes Chrétien, Chrétien De Troyes, Wendelin Foerster in our library for absolutely free. Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader.

Erec and Enide, the first of five surviving Arthurian romantic poems by twelfth-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes, narrates a vivid chapter from the legend of King Arthur. Chrétien's romances became the source for Arthurian tradition and influenced countless other poets in England and on the Continent. Yet his swift-moving style is difficult to capture in translation, and today's English-speaking audiences remain largely unfamiliar with the pleasures of reading his poems. Now an experienced translator of medieval verse who is himself a poet has translated Eric and Enide in an original three-stress metric verse form that fully captures the movement, the sense, and the spirit of the Old French original. Burton Raffel's rendition preserves the subtlety and charm of a poem that is in turn serious, dramatic, bawdy, merry, and satiric. Erec and Enide tells the story of Erec, a knight at King Arthur's court, whose retirement to domestic bliss with his beautiful new wife Enide takes him away from his chivalric duties. To regain his knightly honor, Erec sets out with Enide on a series of amazing adventures. Eric dispatches thieves and giants with prodigious strength and valor but treats his wife rather harshly for doubting his abilities. When Enide is kidnapped by a robber baron, Erec revives from near-death to perform a courageous rescue, and at length the two are reconciled.
Comments:
Anayajurus
Chretien de Troyes invented the Arthurian romance with Erec and Enide. It was the first of what would soon come to be a genre unto itself. Tales of King Arthur and his knights are still popular after centuries of retelling, and Chretien de Troyes is responsible for many of the stories as we know them. Erec and Enide, the earliest of his surviving works, is a story about all the things we recognize as Arthurian--honor, chivalry, love, and courage.

When the poem begins, Erec is a young knight at Arthur's court and heir to his father's throne. When an unknown knight humiliates one of Guinevere's handmaidens during a hunt, Erec follows the knight, his lady, and their cruel dwarf home. There he meets an old man with a beautiful daughter, Enide. They come from ancient nobility but are no impoverished, and the girl can afford nothing but a ragged tunic to wear. The man tells him about a yearly ritual enacted there, where a fine hawk is placed on a perch and only the man with the most beautiful lady can dare to take it. The arrogant young knight from the day before has won several years in a row.

Erec, of course, takes Enide with him to the ritual and, because of Enide's superior beauty, denies the knight the hawk. The knight is furious and challenges Erec to combat, which Erec wins. The father of the girl is so overjoyed that he gives her to Erec as his bride, and the two fall madly in love.

So much in love, in fact, that Erec is soon criticized by many for staying at home in bed when he should be looking to chivalry. After overhearing complaints among the other knights, one night Enide accidentally speaks of her worry about Erec's reputation. Erec is angry and determines to prove himself. He immediately saddles his horse, has Enide follow suit, and orders her to ride ahead of himself and not speak. They set out with no specific destination in mind. Enide is understandably upset.

For the rest of the poem, Erec saves Enide from one predicament after another--three bandits, five bandits, giants, pandering nobles, and would-be assassins. It is never clear whether Erec is proving himself or proving Enide's loyalty, but in the end, when Erec is believed to be dead, only to regain consciousness and kill an overeager suitor, the two are reconciled to each other.

It is then that the poem moves from a string of episodes to a moving and deep symbolic tale that parallels Erec and Enide's own. In another kingdom there is a man trapped in an enchanted garden by his beloved after swearing to do whatever she pleases. In fear that he will leave her, she has made him swear an oath that he will not leave the garden until someone challenges him to combat that he cannot beat. Dozens have tried, and all failed. Erec is victorious, and the man and his lover are set free of the garden.

This, in part, saves Erec and Enide from becoming a tedious, episodic story without a point. The poem--just under 7,000 lines long--is so carefully constructed and unified that a second reading is just as rewarding as the first time. Throughout the story, seemingly every incident in the lives of Erec and Enide have a darker parallel that must be overcome. And, of course, the two lovers must prove to each other that they have "the proper balance between devotion and freedom," that they are not so tied to one another that they neglect their duties, or vice versa.

These themes and the history of the poem are explored in an informative afterword by Joseph Duggan, who has written scholarly end matter for all of Burton Raffel's translations of Chretien's works. Raffel himself has written a short translator's note, and the translation itself is outstanding. As he has proven time and again, Raffel can perfectly balance literalness with beauty--his translations actually convey the spirit of Chretien's poetry.

Erec and Enide is required reading for anyone with an interest in medieval poetry, Arthurian legend, or great literature in general.

Highly recommended.

Urllet
Great for kids. Easy to understand words. Highly recommended for all ages.

Malanim
EREC AND ENIDE is the earliest Arthurian romance. (The eleventh-century Welsh prose tale "Culhwch and Olwen" is also an Arthurian tale, but in it King Arthur has none of the qualities of courtliness and chivalry now associated with Arthurian legend.) Curiously, EREC AND ENIDE was written by a Frenchman, Chrétien de Troyes (Troyes being ninety miles east of Paris). Chrétien was a poet/troubadour who composed his works in Old French. EREC AND ENIDE dates from about 1170 and is the first of five Arthurian romances by Chrétien. Together they comprise one of the masterworks of medieval literature.

Erec is the son of King Lac and also one of the knights of Arthur's Round Table. Chrétien's romance tells of Erec's winning the hand of Enide, a beautiful but impoverished noblewoman, and then touring with her through the countryside of England and Wales fighting a succession of challenges from other knights. After Erec married Enide and returned to King Arthur's Court, he settled down with her to enjoy almost continuous lovemaking. Rumors began to circulate that he had gone soft, and so, to restore his public esteem and renown, Erec goes off, with Enide in tow, to engage in battle after battle. Not only does he validate his manliness and courage, he also instructs Enide on the strict obedience a lady owes her lord.

Along the way, Erec engages in six or seven major battles with other knights, often badly outnumbered. Some of the battles go on for hours. After one, Erec collapses and everyone, including Enide, believes he is dead, although it turns out that his lifelessness was only "a fainting spell". One of Erec's most ferocious battles is with Guivret the Dwarf, who, after Erec finally wins and spares his life, becomes a devoted friend and later on in the tale saves Erec's life. But EREC AND ENIDE is not all knightly warfare. There also are numerous scenes of pageantry and celebration, including the wedding of Erec and Enide and, at the end of the romance, their coronation following the death of Erec's father Lac. That coronation, by the way, is held in Nantes, France; all other action occurs in England and Wales.

Besides being a narrative of adventure, EREC AND ENIDE also served to instruct its hearers on the emerging chivalric code, including such matters as the proper relationship between a knight and his lady as well as how an ideal king treats his vassals. At times, the lavishness of the courts of King Arthur and other nobles beggars credibility: Given the rich costumes, the weeks-on-end tournaments, the feasts, and the excursions involving hundreds of knights and thousands of lackeys, what did these people live on? What sort of economy could support such extravagance?

There are numerous prose versions of Chrétien's Arthurian romances. This edition of EREC AND ENIDE has the supreme virtue of being in verse. In crafting this translation, Burton Raffel's aim was to replicate as closely as practicable the rhythm of the Old French. As translated, the English is contemporary (excepting occasional archaic terms) and reads quite easily. I plan to proceed on to Raffel's translations of Chrétien's other Arthurian romances: "Cligès", "Lancelot: The Knight of the Cart", "Yvain: The Knight of the Lion", and "Perceval: The Story of the Grail".

As an example of the style of Raffel's translation, here is an excerpt describing the wedding night of Erec and Enide:

No hunted stag, panting
With heat, thirsts for a fountain --
No starving sparrow hawk,
Hearing its name, comes flying
Eager back -- more
Than these two hungered to hold
Each other. And they made up,
That night, for all their waiting.
The moment they were left alone
Every part of their bodies
Received its due. * * *
* * * The game
Began with kisses. And love
So plainly shared prepared
The girl, gave her courage,
So nothing made her afraid,
She endured it all, no matter
What. And no longer a girl,
Rose the next morning a woman.

Nilasida
With Arthurian Romances seemingly always staging a comeback, how nice to have a fast-read, "words-a-poppin" translation of the very first Arthurian Romance, written in Old French around 1170. What I found most intriquing was that the book essentially wrestles with the ways in which men and women define themselves when becoming partners. Erec's rather pig-headed forcing of Enide to lead the way in the forest and never speak to him has odd contemporary overtones. But they are sweet compared to the couple they meet in Erec's final quest in the book - wait until you find out who "The Joy of the Court" is. Burton Raffel's translation, even if you don't like poetry, reads like a smooth silver skate.
I gave the book a "9" instead of "10" because it doesn't have any illustrations. I know it's a University Press, but come on folks, with a story about knights couldn't you throw in at least one old woodcut or something

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