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e-Book Suspended Sentences: Three Novellas (The Margellos World Republic of Letters) download

e-Book Suspended Sentences: Three Novellas (The Margellos World Republic of Letters) download

by Patrick Modiano,Mark Polizzotti

ISBN: 0300198051
ISBN13: 978-0300198058
Language: English
Publisher: Yale University Press (November 11, 2014)
Pages: 213
Category: World Literature
Subategory: Literature

ePub size: 1946 kb
Fb2 size: 1436 kb
DJVU size: 1642 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 336
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The three novellas in Suspended Sentences offer a vivid glimpse into Modiano's photographic remembrance of things past. -Brandon Ambrosino, Vox. Patrick Modiano is the winner of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Literature.

The three novellas in Suspended Sentences offer a vivid glimpse into Modiano's photographic remembrance of things past. Reading Modiano is like experiencing a very specific flavor you don’t encounter every day-saffron or asafetida, say. He’s direct and precise, but also gently melancholy, like the squeezed essence of passing time.

In the three novellas gathered as Suspended Sentences, this voice elapses across Paris as it never was yet .

In the three novellas gathered as Suspended Sentences, this voice elapses across Paris as it never was yet somehow must have been. All of these and more Modiano addresses with a luminous bewilderment more intimately exacting and more precise than any certainty could b. ' - -Donald Revell, author of Pennyweight Windows.

Suspended Sentences: Three Novellas. Translated from the french by mark polizzotti. It brings to the English-speaking world the work of leading poets, novelists, essayists, philosophers, and playwrights from Europe, Latin America, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East to stimulate international discourse and creative exchange. A feeling of indirection pervades many of Patrick Modiano’s writings, and the three short novels in this volume are no exception.

Mark Polizzotti reflects on the rewards and challenges of translating Nobel Prize–winning author Patrick Modiano.

Suspended Sentences: Three Novellas (The Margellos World Republic of Letters).

Patrick Modiano, Mark Polizzotti. A trio of intertwined novellas from the 2014 Nobel laureate for literature. In this essential trilogy of novellas by the winner of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Literature, French author Patrick Modiano reaches back in time, opening the corridors of memory and exploring the mysteries to be encountered there.

Modiano, Patrick, Polizzotti, Mark. Although originally published separately, Modiano's three novellas form a single. Series: Margellos world republic of letters book. whole, haunted by the same gauzy sense of place and characters. Modiano draws on his own experiences, blended with the real or invented stories of others, to present a dreamlike autobiography that is also the biography of a place.

With each new book, Modiano has refined his memorial mode

With each new book, Modiano has refined his memorial mode. He is perhaps the most repetitive novelist in world literature: he uses the novel as a serial form, like a screen print. In Suspended Sentences, set during the era of Modiano’s early childhood, the mystery concerns a group of adults who are looking after two brothers. In Afterimage and Flowers of Ruin, the mystery belongs to a stranger encountered in the narrator’s late adolescence. Modiano’s prose is a bleached surface, and Polizzotti has produced a satisfyingly neutral equivalent: That Sunday evening in November I was on Rue de l’Abbé-de-l’Epée.

Suspended Sentences Three Novellas Patrick Modiano, Mark Polizzotti. The Margellos World Republic of Letters

Suspended Sentences Three Novellas Patrick Modiano, Mark Polizzotti. The Margellos World Republic of Letters. No living author has rendered the melancholy of incomplete histories and 'suspended sentences' more beautifully than Modiano. Already a revered author in France, he is sure to gain world-wide admiration and enthusiastic readers as a result of his well-deserved Nobel Prize for Literature.

item 1 Suspended Sentences by Patrick Modiano New Paperback, softback Book -Suspended Sentences by. .Mark Polizzotti has translated more than forty books from the French and is director of the publications program at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Country of Publication.

item 1 Suspended Sentences by Patrick Modiano New Paperback, softback Book -Suspended Sentences by Patrick Modiano New Paperback, softback Book. item 2 Suspended Sentences: Three Novellas (The Margellos World. by Modiano, Patrick -Suspended Sentences: Three Novellas (The Margellos World.

A trio of intertwined novellas from the 2014 Nobel laureate for literature In this essential trilogy of novellas by the winner of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Literature, French author Patrick Modiano reaches back in time, opening the corridors of memory and exploring the mysteries to be encountered there. Each novella in the volume--Afterimage, Suspended Sentences, and Flowers of Ruin—represents a sterling example of the author’s originality and appeal, while Mark Polizzotti’s superb English-language translations capture not only Modiano’s distinctive narrative voice but also the matchless grace and spare beauty of his prose. Although originally published separately, Modiano’s three novellas form a single, compelling whole, haunted by the same gauzy sense of place and characters. Modiano draws on his own experiences, blended with the real or invented stories of others, to present a dreamlike autobiography that is also the biography of a place. Orphaned children, mysterious parents, forgotten friends, enigmatic strangers—each appears in this three-part love song to a Paris that no longer exists. Shadowed by the dark period of the Nazi Occupation, these novellas reveal Modiano’s fascination with the lost, obscure, or mysterious: a young person’s confusion over adult behavior; the repercussions of a chance encounter; the search for a missing father; the aftershock of a fatal affair. To read Modiano’s trilogy is to enter his world of uncertainties and the almost accidental way in which people find their fates.  
Comments:
felt boot
Reading these three novellas (57, 67, and 80 pages respectively) was one of the stranger experiences I have had for some time. Every few pages, I found myself slipping into a kind of waking dream, in which the facts of the text would shimmer and rearrange themselves into something that was not in the text at all. Yes, I was tired. But even after an ample nap, I found the same thing happening. I can only conclude that it is an intended feature of Modiano's style. His narrators, like memory detectives, summon the names of places, people, and half-remembered details, but the result is not so much to clarify the past as to cloak it in still more mystery. It always surprised me when I came upon some reference to the afternoon hour or the bright sun, because all these memories gave the sensation of taking place in darkness, under cover of night and fog.

As soon as Modiano's Nobel Prize was announced, I bought the first book I could get my hands on, RUE DES BOUTIQUES OBSCURES (translated as MISSING PERSON), in which a private detective with amnesia investigates the mystery of his own past. I found it an easy read (even in French) and a fine introduction to the author, but suspected that I would need to read more, since the prize was awarded for the body of his work rather than a single book. So I ordered another in French (not yet arrived) and these three in the fine English translation of Mark Polizziotti. The paradoxical result has been to confirm my suspicion about the wholeness of Modiano's oeuvre while still further blurring the nature of it... unless its essence is blur itself. I began to notice proper names cropping up in the novellas that I remembered from the novel, and after a while it became difficult to recall in which of the three stories a person, place, or event was first mentioned. Yet this is not surprising. The place is always Paris, especially its stairs, dark passages, and suburbs where tourists seldom go. And Modiano has said that all his fiction, regardless of its packaging, is "a kind of autobiography, but one that is dreamed up or imaginary."

"Afterimage," the first novella in this collection (though the last to be published), sets down the narrator's memories of a largely forgotten photographer. Meeting him as a young man, he offers to catalogue his enigmatic photos of the Thirties and Forties, shortly before the artist himself leaves Paris and disappears. It is a story less important for the secrets it reveals than for the sad awareness that future generations may not even know that secrets existed. "Suspended Sentences," the second novella, is more frankly a childhood memoir. The narrator (called by his nickname Patoche) and his brother are sent to live with three women in a distant suburb while their mother is on an extended theatrical tour. Their own childhood mysteries (for example about the deserted chateau at the edge of the village) interlace gradually with real adult mysteries about the strange people who come to the house, and mysterious trips into Paris by sports car. "Flowers of Ruin," the final piece, begins with accounts of an unsolved murder from the Thirties. As the narrator tries to investigate it, it too combines with mysteries he discovers in his own time -- such as a Peruvian who sometimes passes himself off as a French Count, but whom the records show as having died at Dachau. The translator, in his excellent introduction, quotes Modiano as saying, "The more obscure and mysterious things remained, the more interested I became in them. I even looked for mystery where there was none."

Although these are not primarily Holocaust books, their mysteries all go back to the period of the German occupation of Paris, which ended just before the author was born. I suspect that many of the names and places mentioned would have associations with older French readers that the most of us miss. For example, there is mention in several stories of the "Rue Lauriston gang." Google the street, and you will find one of the dirtier French secrets of the war. A secret in which Modiano's father appears to have been involved. A Jew, he was arrested and briefly imprisoned, but subsequently released. Why, and what did he have to do to stay free? All of Modiano's work that I have read so far or read about seems to be an indirect investigation of those mysteries. An investigation and an atonement.

"I hadn't moved from the window. Under the pouring rain, he crossed the street and went to lean against the retaining wall of the steps we had walked down shortly before. And he stood there, unmoving, his back against the wall, his head raised toward the building façade. Rainwater poured onto him from the top of the steps, and his jacket was drenched. But he did not move an inch. At that moment a phenomenon occurred for which I'm still trying to find an explanation: had the street lamp at the top of the steps suddenly gone out? Little by little, the man melted into the wall. Or else the rain, from falling on him so heavily, had dissolved him, the way water dilutes a fresco that hasn't had time to dry properly. As hard as I pressed my forehead against the glass and peered at the dark gray wall, no trace of him remained. He had vanished in that sudden way that I'd later notice in other people, like my father, which leaves you so puzzled that you have no choice but to look for proofs and clues to convince yourself these people had really existed."

Coron
Thanks to the Nobel Committee and their choice of Patrick Modiano. While I consider myself fairly well-read, I had never heard of this author before his winning the Prize, and was surprised that people far more literary-minded than I had not either. Much of his work had not been translated into English. If these three novellas are any example, his work is exceptional. Moody, haunting, slippery. After a rain, "a smell of gasoline and wet leaves hovered in the air." The narrators in each case are the least interesting people in each story, observing the lives of those around them, barely present in the action. But the passages, some of which I had to stop and go over more than once, linger. "Behind me a jukebox was playing an Italian song. The stench of burning tires floated in the air. A girl was walking under the leaves of the trees along Boulevard Jourdan. Her blond bangs, cheekbones and green dress were the only note of freshness on that early August afternoon. Why bother chasing ghosts and trying to solve insoluble mysteries when life was there, in all its simplicity beneath the sun." Not since Every Many Dies Alone have I been so struck by the quality of writing and immediacy of experience.

Tto
The three novellas in this collection by Patrick Modiano, a French writer who won the 2014 Nobel Prize in literature read like reminiscences, walks down memory lane by the author donning the guise of his three main protagonists. The author provides so many recognizable (or verifiable) details that these fictional accounts hover constantly along the edges of reality. And, maybe this is what ties these novellas together—that stories we tell, however fictional or even fantastical, somehow always come back to things that are (or were) real in the author’s life. Fiction, for most writers explains and extends who they are.

For Modiano, a French Jew who was born at about the end of World War II, the holocaust is what looms large in that past, and consequently, in his “being.” He makes allusions to it in each of these three novellas, all set just a few years after the war. A major aspect of those allusions relates to his sense of losing someone whose “being” is now condensed in memories. It’s no wonder he won the coveted Nobel “for the art of memory with which he has evoked the most ungraspable human destinies and uncovered the life-world of the Occupation.”

The sad, inevitable fact of life that threads through these novellas may be this—the uncertainty and finite life of memories, and our inability to grasp them fully, even when we can recount details. In life, as in fiction, those recollected details can only hover along the edges of what really happened. But Modiano tries his darnedest to recall them, sometimes street by street, as if he’s afraid to forget them.

As you read Patrick Modiano’s narrations of the unique stories of his main characters, you’re likely to be drawn into his meditative mood, to look back at your own life. Buried in the nostalgia of that past are little nuggets of ourselves. Nuggets that come to us as memories we coax out of neurons in our brain, or call up from things stashed in garaged boxes. Either way, we have to deal with the fact that not only are those memories foggy, they fleet away after awhile. Maybe, Modiano’s compulsion to rehearse his experience (and that of others he knew) of the holocaust is his way of keeping it alive.

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