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e-Book Stars: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) download

e-Book Stars: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) download

by Andrew King

ISBN: 0199602921
ISBN13: 978-0199602926
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (September 7, 2012)
Pages: 136
Category: Astronomy and Space Science
Subategory: Math Science

ePub size: 1710 kb
Fb2 size: 1244 kb
DJVU size: 1808 kb
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 153
Other Formats: docx rtf txt lrf

I recommend the "A Very Short Introduction" books to everyone.

Great read, perhaps gets lost at times, wondered why they didn’t got from birth to final stages of a star, but still very good and easy to understand. Will definitely aid me in preparing my own lessons for HS students for science. I recommend the "A Very Short Introduction" books to everyone.

I recommend the "A Very Short Introduction" books to everyone.

Like many of the OUP "Very Short Introduction" series, you can't really tell . In this illuminating Very Short Introduction, Roger Scruton-a well-known and controver.

Like many of the OUP "Very Short Introduction" series, you can't really tell what the boo. The History of Time: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions). It was fairly interesting to read and was very. The History of Life: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions). Aristotle: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions - 32). 177 Pages·2000·2. 95 MB·3,084 Downloads·New!

In this lively and compact introduction, astrophysicist Andrew King .

There are very few countries that can boast of an intellectual tradition that is as impressive as that of Germany. In light of this trend, a short primer like this book is a useful introduction to German philosophy for a new generation of readers

There are very few countries that can boast of an intellectual tradition that is as impressive as that of Germany. This is particularly true of the "hard" sciences and philosophy. In fact, when it comes to philosophy, it could be argued that for a couple of centuries Germany was a philosophical "superpower. In light of this trend, a short primer like this book is a useful introduction to German philosophy for a new generation of readers. The book is aimed at the general readership, and no formal knowledge of German philosophy is assumed. The author does a tremendous job of succinctly and lucidly presenting the most important ideas in German philosophical tradition.

To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

The book is overall much better than that.

It is not-and does not claim to be-a comprehensive survey. It would not serve as the textbook for a full course in logic, but can be an affordable supplement in other courses, or even read by someone simply curious about the study of logic. The book is overall much better than that. But ANY good textbook book has an obligation to provide balance and range among its examples, political religious, or whatever.

Every atom of our bodies has been part of a star. Our very own star, the Sun, is crucial to the development and sustainability of life on Earth.

Another excellent offering from the 'Very Short Introduction' collection. I have read several of these before and like the substance offered, which is more than you get in a coffee table book but less than a textbook. Having said that, this one was a lot more technical than others I have read. It's an interesting addition to this series although I preferred Galaxies & Planets in this series.

Every atom of our bodies has been part of a star. In this lively and compact introduction, astrophysicist Andrew King reveals how the laws of physics force stars to evolve, driving them through successive stages of maturity before their inevitable and sometimes spectacular deaths, to end as remnants such as black holes. The book shows how we know what stars are made of, how gravity forces stars like the Sun to shine by transmuting hydrogen into helium in their centers, and why this stage is so long-lived and stable. Eventually the star ends its life in one of just three ways, and much of its enriched chemical content is blasted into space in its death throes. Every dead star is far smaller and denser than when it began, and we see how astronomers can detect these stellar corpses as pulsars and black holes and other exotic objects. King also shows how astronomers now use stars to measure properties of the Universe, such as its expansion. Finally, the book asks how it is that stars form in the first place, and how they re-form out of the debris left by stars already dead. These birth events must also be what made planets, not only in our solar system, but around a large fraction of all stars.
Comments:
Nidora
I learned more in these 120 pages than in an equal number of books about stellar evolution I have read. The author does a fantastic job of explaining difficult concepts in a non- mathematical manner. Most of the math he presents is in simple relational terms, such as how different physical variables relate to each other in terms of ratio and proportionality. This is an excellent approach to explaining how stars work.

As an amateur astronomer I wish the author had given examples of actual stars in the night sky. For example, there is no mention of the formation of planetary nebulae in the book and little information on the different types of variable stars. Surprisingly, this is the only book on stars I have ever read where there is no mention of stellar classification. A topic which I find quite boring. In fairness to the author, as stated, the book is a very short introduction.

I purchased both the ebook and paperback for my library. If you are interested in astronomy I whole heartedly recommend this book.

Flocton
Of the Very Short Introduction series I have read to date this is my second favorite (Partical Physics my first). Great read, perhaps gets lost at times, wondered why they didn’t got from birth to final stages of a star, but still very good and easy to understand. Will definitely aid me in preparing my own lessons for HS students for science.

Jusari
Excellent non-mathematical introduction. Concise and well written. Some additional material and illustrations would have helped in places, hence the four stars, but this may simply be the limitations of the series format.

Arith
This was a very beautiful and complete description of the physics of stars of all sizes. I was extremely impressed with the detail of the physical processes that cause the stars to do what they do - explode, grow, become black holes, neutron stars and more. I highly recommend this book to those with a little physics background.

Weetont
Book was excellent. It helped me learn more about how stars work. I recommend the "A Very Short Introduction" books to everyone.

SupperDom
Well written and excellent explanations of our universe.

Saintrius
Very good price for the information contained. If you think you might be interested in cosmology, but not sure, then you cant go wrong with this book. I have found the whole series to be very good. Surely this is not the "best" book about stars, but I bet when you factor in value it very nearly is.

Very informative at a non mathematical level. Would be good for anyone looking for a quick intro into the evolution of stars.

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