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e-Book Journey into Space: The First Three Decades of Space Exploration download

e-Book Journey into Space: The First Three Decades of Space Exploration download

by Bruce C. Murray

ISBN: 0393026752
ISBN13: 978-0393026757
Language: English
Publisher: W W Norton & Co Inc; 1st edition (July 1, 1989)
Pages: 382
Category: Astronomy and Space Science
Subategory: Math Science

ePub size: 1713 kb
Fb2 size: 1145 kb
DJVU size: 1926 kb
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 163
Other Formats: lrf rtf mbr lrf

Bruce Murray's book, Journey into Space is a good primer for one's understanding of the earlier MarsĀ .

Bruce Murray's book, Journey into Space is a good primer for one's understanding of the earlier Mars exploration missions and his zeal in writing about these missions and the hopes that he and many others had is infectious to the reader. I have more than a candid interest in space exploration and I can easily and readily follow his thoughts throughout the book and the progression of him and his collegues working at JPL at Caltech. I would personally like to read a book like this from the Russian perspective of space exploration back in the 1960's because the Russians were first and the better than us in many things.

Journey Into Space book. A coworker and I were discussing a few weeks ago (April 2011) how sad it is that NASA is retiring the Space Shuttle program. I mentioned that I thought it felt like giving up - they say that the shuttles cost so much money that we don't have, and they're not getting enough in return, but what about the spirit of exploring? What about the spirit of discovery, and finding out more about our solar system?

The JPL's robots were first on Mars, first to bring us close-up photographs of Saturn's rings and Jupiter's moons, and in. .

The JPL's robots were first on Mars, first to bring us close-up photographs of Saturn's rings and Jupiter's moons, and in August of this year will deliver the first clear images of distant Neptune to our planet. But during NASA's post-Apollo funding letdown, JPL's robots became, practically speaking, extinct. Murray concludes this cautionary tale by urging the US to aggressively pursue the obvious next step in space exploration: international, cooperative missions to Mars and beyond. Perhaps with the added wisdom of experience, this bleak era, he believes, can come to represent not the beginning of the end of space exploration for America, but merely the end of the beginning.

Bruce C. Murray, American Planetary scientist, educator, administrator. Achievement medal National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1971, Distinguished Public Svc. medal, 1974; Guggenheim fellow, 1975-1976, 92

Bruce C. Murray, American Planetary scientist, educator, administrator Journey into Space: The First Three Decades of Space Exploration by Bruce C. Murray (1989-07-03). 1JE06/?tag prabook0b-20. Navigating the Future ) About the challenges we face, the possible outcomes of the present, and the profound implications for human values represented by those choices.

Home . Details for: Journey into space : Normal view MARC view ISBD view. Journey into space : the first three decades of space exploration, Bruce Murray. Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title.

Bruce, Murray C. Publication Year. Space Exploration Hardback Non-Fiction Books. Place of Publication. W. Norton and Company, Inc. Weight. Exploration Paperback Books. Explore Australia Paperback Books. Paperback Mary Grant Bruce Books. Additional site navigation.

This is a timeline of space exploration including notable achievements and first accomplishments or major events in humanity's exploration of outer space. Discovery and exploration of the Solar System. Timeline of Solar System exploration. Timeline of artificial satellites and space probes. Timeline of space travel by nationality. Chronology of Space Exploration archive of important space exploration missions and events, including future planned and proposed endeavors. Manned spaceflight 1961-1980.

the first three decades of space exploration. 1st ed. by Bruce C. Murray. Published 1989 by Norton in New York. Exploration, Internet Archive Wishlist. There's no description for this book yet.

This chapter is excerpted from Journey into Space: The First Three Decades of Space Exploration by Bruce Murray, pub/ished in july 1989. During this short-lived alignment a prop-erly designed spacecraft launched to Jupiter from Earth can, with the right choice of close trajec-tory at Jupiter, break the sun's gravitational pull and fly on to Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune-the Grand Tour-and then, past Neptune, disappear forever into interstellar space.

Director of Pasadena's Jet Propulsion Laboratory from 1976 to 1982, Bruce Murray is uniquely qualified to tell the story of America's unmanned space program. Mixing an insider's knowledge of the politics of space with a scientist's command of technical intricacy, he chronicles our rise and decline in space and calls for a return to greatness.

Charting the USA's rise and decline as a leader of the space race, this text describes the last 30 years of space exploration and research, from early attempts to break free of Earth's atmosphere to the latest projects, such as Voyager II and NASA's flawed Space Shuttle programme.
Comments:
Ustamya
The book is very good.
I always read the Carl Sagan's books. It is important to know others authors in this area.
The history of the space exploration is amazing.
We need any information about a period that the cold war was present and the knowledge was a survival point.
This book shows important moments of the Discovery about the mysteries of the Mars, Moon, Venus, etc.

Roru
An excellent history of unmanned space exploration

RuTGamer
Bruce Murray, former director of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, provides in this book an excellent discussion of the planetary science program of the United States from the dawn of the space age in the 1950s to the end of the cold war. It is an entertaining and interesting analysis of the cause of planetary space exploration written by a brilliant iconoclast in the space science community. Murray's ideas are always fascinating to consider, and his running critique on the role of humans versus robots in space exploration is certainly worth considering. This book is divided into five parts starting with the search for life on Mars, and continuing through "Probing Warmer Worlds," Voyager and the Grandest Tour Ever," "Lost in Space," "Comet Tales," and a reprise on returning to Mars. In each section Murray brings his hard-edged perspective and sometimes biting wit to trace the evolution of planetary exploration between the 1950s and 1980s. I will comment on two very interesting aspects of this book.

The first is the section that Murray writes at the beginning of the book on the longstanding human fascination of the possibility of life on Mars that Percival Lowell ignited and that culminated in the Viking landers on Mars in 1976. After years of belief that Mars might harbor life, the Viking landings demonstrated that the prospects for discovering extraterrestrial life had been oversold. Murray explains here that the Viking landers had been ballyhooed as a definite means of ascertaining whether or not life existed on Mars. The public expected to find it, and probably so did many of the scientists, and what would happen when hopes were dashed? Murray argued that "the extraordinarily hostile environment revealed by the Mariner flybys made life there so unlikely that public expectations should not be raised." Carl Sagan, who fully expected to find something there, accused Murray of pessimism. Murray asserted that Sagan was far too optimistic. And the two publicly jousted over how to treat the Viking mission. Murray, as well as other politically savvy scientists and public intellectuals, argued that the legacy of failure to detect life, despite billions spent on research since the beginning of the space age and over-optimistic statements that a breakthrough was just around the corner, would spark public disappointment and perhaps an outrage manifested in reduced public funding for the effort (pp. 61, 68-69, 74, 77). Murray seems to have been right, for after the Viking missions the U.S. did not send another probe to Mars until the 1990s.

Second, Murray is at his best in charting the bobs and weaves, ebbs and flows of space science politics in relation to the human spaceflight agenda of NASA. Without question, NASA's emphasis has been on human spaceflight--it consumes approximately half of the NASA budget every year--and the planetary exploration agenda must always be cognizant of this overarching priority. As the Space Shuttle came on line in the early 1980s, the planetary exploration program constantly fell sway to the shuttle's priorities. The NASA budget reflected the importance of the shuttle program, and the need to launch everything on the shuttle prompted the reconfiguration of planetary probes for that requirement. Murray makes numerous comments on this subject. He wrote that his planetary missions were constantly challenged by the shuttle, as NASA's dollars were poured into a development program which lagged behind schedule and over budget. He refers to the shuttle as NASA's "sacred cow" which always has to be fed despite any other worthwhile projects that went begging. This was especially true during the early 1980s when the shuttle was first starting to fly and the Reagan administration was intent on cutting government expenditures. In essence, Murray concludes, the shuttle priority ensured that the United States would have no mission to Halley's Comet when it reached Earth in 1986. Moreover, while it proved and enormously significant mission, what became the Galileo probe to Jupiter was constantly reconfigured for shuttle launch, each time increasing costs and compromising the quality of the science.

Murray ends his book with a reconsideration of Mars exploration, but this time with other nations. Writing in 1989, just as the Soviet Union was on the verge of collapse, he foresaw some of the cooperative efforts that became the norm for spaceflight in the 1990s and later.

This is an important book, and one that is very useful for any who wishing to understand the nature of planetary exploration since the dawn of the space age. Too bad that it is out of print. Fortunately, there are several second hand copies available at reasonable prices. Buy them and read Murray's analysis. It is well worth the time and energy.

Arryar
I like this book. I really like it. However I was born about three years after Bruce Murray the author become laboratory director of JPL and my perspective of mars exploration has come, not from the triumphant Viking landers that landed there in 1975 and were giving us the first ground view photographs of Mars and soil data, but from the Pathfinder rover and breathtaking Mars Spirit and Opportunity rovers, landing on Martian soil in 1997 (Pathfinder) and MER-A and MER-B both in 2004.

Bruce Murray's book, Journey into Space is a good primer for one's understanding of the earlier Mars exploration missions and his zeal in writing about these missions and the hopes that he and many others had is infectious to the reader. I have more than a candid interest in space exploration and I can easily and readily follow his thoughts throughout the book and the progression of him and his collegues working at JPL at Caltech. I didn't know before this -- that JPL was actually a division of both the Caltech University and NASA, it is not a free standing entity. The author explains this on pages 47-48. You hear JPL always mentioned in the news today, when they talk about the Mars rovers or other projects designed to explore planetary bodies. I did not know the interesting history behind JPL that it was inherited by NASA from the United States Army as part of a government agreement going back to World War II. That was when Universities worked with government to find ways to "work for the common good." That interesting bit of information is worth reading the book alone, as it is very clear from this that the United States was different back then.

It was a different era, it was the era of a Golden age of space exploration, which could not have been made possible if not for the World War mentality and the post-war mentality from many of the same people, both in the United States and Russia. Does that really exist anymore? I don't see it. And yet there is lot of enthusiasm still about going to space but it just does not seem to have the same iron-will mentality that "We have to go there!" That Iron will mentality the Apollo spirit existed back then and the proof of our accomplishments was spectacular but it does not have to be the end.

I would personally like to read a book like this from the Russian perspective of space exploration back in the 1960's because the Russians were first and the better than us in many things. Two glowing and very notable examples were their Sputnik in 1957 and then MIR space station in 1986, which preceded the ISS by over ten years. The Russians also had sent up like six times more the amount of tonnage of Spacecraft to Mars than we the United States did all the way up to 1988, but we hear little of that, mainly because they had hardly any sucess with any of those missions! Most of them were failures, which the author describes as a possible culprit to the "Great Galactic Ghoul." I have always wondered about that myself, considering how wonderfully comptetent the Russians are and have proven themselves to be at exploration, why the poor track record to Mars? The United States has fortunately had a much better success rate at sending probes to Mars however the potential of the "Great Galactic Ghoul," still seems to exist. Especially now with Obama and Congress cutting NASA's budget and putting the final nails in the coffin of our once great National dreams of exploring space.

From The Golden Age, to Fantasy to Catastrophe, Bruce Murray discusses the space program which he was a part of at JPL and emphasizes his work and enthusiasm in the United States efforts to explore space. His main emphasize and not fantasy interest is in Mars exploration and I think it is somewhat enlightening to see what America has done in Mars exploration since this book was written in 1989. It would also be good for the author to know now that the Space Shuttle is on it's last schedulated launch now, hurrah! with the Endeavour coming back, the Space Shuttle era is almost at an end. Reading the book Journey Into Space one can see the author Bruce Murray's viewpoints on why the Shuttle Only policy of NASA was a mistake and how it has set us back in terms of where we should be in space exploration. He even mockingly refers to the Space Shuttle as a "Temple" which NASA has erected, that good space exploration and beneficial science has been sacrificed. One such doomed proposal was a Solar Sailing mission to Halley's comet in 1985, which didn't happen for the United States. Russia and the ESA flew probes to Halley's comet in 1986 while we just sat and watched. "What had happened to the Apollo spirit?" the author forlornly asks.

Anyone who is interested in the Mars exploration the authors discusses that seems to be abrupty ended, in the book, I would suggest picking up the Februray 2001 issue of National Geographic and any other current National Geographic magazines which shows photographs that are more enlightening and dynamically favorable to the argument of water on mars and the possibility that Mars north pole contains frozen water. The breathtaking images from the more modern Surveyor spacecraft are quite a bit more revealing and interesting than those taken by the older mariner 9. The water argument rears its head at the Noachis Terra "Watermarks" crater wall, the Gorgonum Chaos crater, with gullies and lines almost unmistakably appear that were etched by water. So definitely read the book as a primer for anyone wanting to understand where the United States is in space travel and why we have fallen behind to the sheer stupidty that we are now. Also I could recommend a good LaRouche video that talks about this as well, as that group is the only one that I have seen who appears to share the same enthusiasm of resurrecting the "Apollo" spirit of NASA and getting the United States back on track as leaders in space exploration. It won't get done with SpaceShip One or any of these other goofy Space Shuttle inspired private ventures.

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