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e-Book Relativity: Special, General, and Cosmological download

e-Book Relativity: Special, General, and Cosmological download

by Wolfgang Rindler

ISBN: 0198508360
ISBN13: 978-0198508366
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press (October 18, 2001)
Pages: 448
Category: Mathematics
Subategory: Math Science

ePub size: 1510 kb
Fb2 size: 1171 kb
DJVU size: 1695 kb
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 659
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Professor Wolfgang Rindler Department of Physics The University of Texas at Dallas Richardson, TX. .The author is a world class scholar, and he gives a very comprehensive introduction to relativity, both special and general.

The author is a world class scholar, and he gives a very comprehensive introduction to relativity, both special and general. Consequently, every serious student will be forced to purchase this book and study it thoroughly and quite carefully. As churlish as it may sound, I expect more from a world class scholar, teamed with one of the top technical publishers in the world.

The books basic purpose is to make relativity come alive conceptually.

In conference after conference the view is expressed that cosmology today is where particle physics was forty years ago, with major discoveries just waiting to happen. Also gravitational wave detectors, presently under construction or in the testing phase, promise to open up an entirely novel field of physics. The books basic purpose is to make relativity come alive conceptually. Hence the emphasis on the foundations and the logical subtleties rather than on the mathematics or the detailed experiments per se.

For special relativity, the easy book of Taylor and Wheeler is probably better (although maybe a little cheesy). If you are really interested in understanding the modern importance of General Relativity, you will not be disappointed. Everyone will need to read Rindler at some stage. Personally, I think it better to leave it as a "have to read"--like it or not. It's aggravatingly unclear in important points. Professor Rindler and his wife, Linda, are two of the most generous people I had the privilege to know. When I was a graduate student, they were ever so kind and helpful. Dr. David Kronmiller - San Diego California.

Wolfgang Rindler (18 May 1924 – 8 February 2019) was a physicist working in the field of General Relativity where he is known for introducing the term "event horizon", Rindler coordinates, an.

Wolfgang Rindler (18 May 1924 – 8 February 2019) was a physicist working in the field of General Relativity where he is known for introducing the term "event horizon", Rindler coordinates, and (in collaboration with Roger Penrose) for popularizing the use of spinors in general relativity. An honorary member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and foreign member of the Accademia delle Scienze di Torino, he was also a prolific textbook author.

The Special and General Theory. Translated by Robert W. Lawson Rel. Introduction to General Relativity,. Black Holes, and Cosmology. Yvonne Choquet-Bruhat. General Relativity, Black Holes, and Cosmology. 7 MB·5,436 Downloads. Table of contents page iii 1. Special Relativity. Gravitation and cosmology principles and applications of the general theory of relativity. 79 MB·1,760 Downloads. Principles and applications.

This book is a considerable amplification and modernisation of the author's earlier Essential relativity (1980ersg.

This book is a considerable amplification and modernisation of the author's earlier Essential Relativity

This book is a considerable amplification and modernisation of the author's earlier Essential Relativity. Its basic purpose is to make relativity come alive conceptually.

Special, General, and Cosmological. Also the basic purpose of the book remains the same, and that is to make relativity come alive conceptually. price for USA in USD (gross). I have always felt much sym­ pathy with Richard Courant's maxim (as reported and exemplified by Pascual Jordan) that, ideally, proofs should be reached by comprehension rather than computation.

Wolfgang Rindler Professor of Physics The University of Texas at Dallas. 3. Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford.

Roughly equal coverage is given tospecial relativity, general relativity, and cosmology. Special relativity escapes this tag with a ven geance, and tends to be taught as a pure service discipline, with too little emphasis on its startling ideas. With many judicious omissions it can be taught in one semester, but it would better serve as the basis of a year's work. What better time, there fore, to enjoy these subjects for their own sake than as an und- v vi PREFACE graduate?

This text is a considerable amplification and modernization of the authors' earlier Essential Relativity. It brings relativity alive conceptually and emphasizes the foundations and the logical subtleties rather than the mathematics or the detailed experiments. It includes 300 exercises and promotes a visceral understanding and the confidence to tackle any fundamental relativistic problem. Following a critical overview of the whole field, special-relativistic kinematics is presented three dimensionally before the mathematical level gradually rises. Four vectors preceded mechanics, four tensors precede Maxwell theory, and three chapters on cosmology end the text. This book brings the challenge and excitement of modern relativity and cosmology at a rigorous mathematical level within the reach of advanced undergraduates, while containing enough new material to interest lecturers and researchers.
Comments:
Little Devil
The author does a pretty good job of explaining physical concepts, but is obviously impatient at explaining mathematics. In the chapter on electromagnetism he introduces tensor notation and important theorems such as co- and contra-variance without explanation. In some cases he says "the proof is left to the reader." The treatment is much less detailed than Einstein's original 1915 paper. It is like a book that purports to teach you French, and which summarily presents an abstract French-English dictionary and then the rest of the book is written in French.

Xwnaydan
This book is an update of the author's previous work "Essential Relativity," although the former book remains available through another publisher. "Essential Relativity" contains interesting (to me) material that had to be omitted from the new volume. The new volume contains necessary updates. The author is a world class scholar, and he gives a very comprehensive introduction to relativity, both special and general. Consequently, every serious student will be forced to purchase this book and study it thoroughly and quite carefully.

As churlish as it may sound, I expect more from a world class scholar, teamed with one of the top technical publishers in the world. Rindler really begins the technical discussion in section 2.7, which is a modest edit of a section from his previous book "Introduction to Special Relativity." In it, he considers a free particle whose trajectory is parameterized by its own particular clock, mu. He then considers the coordinates of two separate inertial references frames. By differentiating by mu, he is able to show that the coordinates of inertial systems have to be linearly related. A page or two later, he has derived the whole Lorentz transformation in quite a lot of detail (not perfect detail). On finding the "truth," we then see that different observers see time sources quite differently. This is not obviously consistent with the original differentiation. For beginning classes, at least, this is at least an unnecessary source of potential confusion. Compare and contrast this ponderous progression with the smooth and economical set up for the Lorentz Transformation that is to be found in the first chapter of Landau and Lifschitz's "Classical Theory of FIelds." It seems, at first, that Landau Lifschitz is at least infinitely better---maybe more. Is Rindler somehow silly, or a person of poor taste? No, that's not at all the case. He makes this choice for a clear pedagogical reason. He wants to show that the principle that physics is the same in all inertial systems is of primary importance and that the invariance of light speed in all inertial frames gives us much less information. Is that true? It could be true (read Landau Lifschitz), but it is, whatever else, the view of an important scholar, and one that every student needs to take seriously---even if it is phrased in quite a laborious and perhaps somewhat self-inconsistent way.

Rindler clearly tries to give the best possible understanding of the physics, apart from the mathematics. In that he certainly gets a partial success, but he seems to me not to get a full success. For that, I could cite his explanation of the relativity of simultaneity, time dilation, and space contraction in section 2.4. On the one hand, it is clearly independent of mathematics. On the other hand, I find it labored and unclear---perhaps poorly edited. These are very early examples in the book. To me, the whole book is something like that. It attempts to put full emphasis on the physical view while including only enough mathematics to make everything correct and essentially complete.

It is my own idea that most people will be better served to use the two volumes of N.M.J. Woodhouse (of Oxford University) on special and general relativity as a better, easier, clearer introduction. Woodhouse makes no attempt to sidestep the mathematics, and that is appropriate. There is no actual understanding of relativity apart from the mathematics. So, it makes sense to grin and embrace it. I think his is the clearer and better place to start. For special relativity, the easy book of Taylor and Wheeler is probably better (although maybe a little cheesy). Everyone will need to read Rindler at some stage. Personally, I think it better to leave it as a "have to read"---like it or not. It's aggravatingly unclear in important points. These ought to be something of an obstacle to first learning, although they will not really encumber a sophisticated reader. First become sophisticated with Woodhouse and then you can read Rindler through much more economically and without being bothered on belabored points.

Rindler is actually a world class scholar---a great man. That is not tongue in cheek or some sort of backhanded attempt to insult him. He actually is a great scholar, and I respect that. I expect great scholars to offer better writing than this.

Umsida
I had to use this book for my graduate-level relativity/cosmology course. I managed to do well in the course, but only because my professor was quite willing to devote many office hours to helping students. Do you know what is good to have in a textbook, especially one that introduces highly abstract physics and mathematics like relativity and tensors? EXAMPLES. Rindler just zooms through, introducing abstraction after abstraction with no examples on how to actually use anything. Who is he kidding?

If you don't have a professor with flexible office hours and due dates, this book is worthless.

Syleazahad
This is one of the worst text I came across. Author keep discussing a topic but never points to the result. A book where you keep flipping back and forth to make sense. Often notations are used but there is no explanation what they represents. I have gone through chapter 15 and 18 ,on Linearized GR and FRW metric, following every step and found out that there are few errors and a lot of key steps are omitted. For example, gauge transformations are done and results are obtained but if you won't consult other similar texts then you won't know what are the results and which are the transformations, unless you already are a professor. Almost same topic is discussed in Inverno's book and you can clearly see what are the various transformations and what are the results.

A book may contain every topic what you are looking for but the key Qs is how well are they conveyed. In order to write an excellent text the author should be first clear about it in his own mind and organize it before publishing it. Save yourself and get a nicer book like Inverno or Stephani. I would not recommend this text for GR unless absolutely necessary.

Уou ll never walk alone
The book was in perfect condition and got to my place within a couple of days after ordering it. Great speed!

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