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e-Book Hunger Mountain: A Field Guide to Mind and Landscape download

e-Book Hunger Mountain: A Field Guide to Mind and Landscape download

by David Hinton

ISBN: 1611800161
ISBN13: 978-1611800166
Language: English
Publisher: Shambhala (November 13, 2012)
Pages: 144
Category: Nature and Ecology
Subategory: Math Science

ePub size: 1972 kb
Fb2 size: 1824 kb
DJVU size: 1434 kb
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 218
Other Formats: mobi azw txt rtf

Come along with David Hinton on a series of walks through the wild beauty of Hunger Mountain, near his home in Vermont-excursions informed by the worldview he’s . Hunger Mountain: A Field. has been added to your Cart.

Come along with David Hinton on a series of walks through the wild beauty of Hunger Mountain, near his home in Vermont-excursions informed by the worldview he’s imbibed from his many years translating the classics of Chinese poetry and philosophy. His broad-ranging discussion offers insight on everything from the mountain landscape to the origins of consciousness and the Cosmos.

David Hinton is an excellent translator of classical Chinese poetry. I had hoped that this book would say more about the connection between landscape and that tradition. There are glimpses of that. David Hinton’s many translations of classical Chinese poetry have earned wide acclaim for creating compelling contemporary poems that convey the texture and density of the originals.

Enjoyed exploring Hunger Mountain with David Hinton. Hunger Mountain is in the Green Mountains of Vermont in the United States. I was captivated by his style, which I found ethereal and poetic and lovely. David Hinton, a prize-winning translator of classical Chinese poetry and philosophical works, lives with his family near the mountain and regularly climbs the peak for the purposes of solitude and reflection.

Hunger Mountain book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Hunger Mountain: A Field Guide to Mind and Landscape as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Come along with David Hinton on a series of walks through the wild.

Автор: Hinton David Название: Hunger Mountain: A Field Guide to. .

Автор: Hinton David Название: Hunger Mountain: A Field Guide to Mind and Landscape Издательство: Random House (USA) Классификация: Окружающая среда ISBN: 1611800161 ISBN-13(EAN): 9781611800166 ISBN: 1-61180-016-1 ISBN-13(EAN): 978-1-61180-016-6 Обложка/Формат: Paperback Вес: . 63 к. Поставляется из: США Описание: Learning to see with the eyes of the ancient Chinese sages can change your view of the universe, as David Hinton demonstrates. He takes us on a series of walks up Hunger Mountain, a wilderness area near his home in Vermont.

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As in Thoreau’s Walden, there are chapters named by topic, including Sincerity, Friends, and Ritual. Other chapters have more elliptical titles: Dragon Bone, Breath-Seed Home, Loom of Origins. The phrase Hunger Mountain sounds evocative and figurative: a metaphor for life’s appetites and struggles.

A Field Guide to Mind and Landscape

A Field Guide to Mind and Landscape. A Field Guide to Mind and Landscape. Come along with David Hinton on a series of walks through the wild beauty of Hunger Mountain, near his home in Vermont-excursions informed by the worldview he’s imbibed from his many years translating the classics of Chinese poetry and philosophy. His broad-ranging discussion offers insight on everything from the mountain landscape to the origins of consciousness and the Cosmos, from geology to Chinese landscape painting, from parenting to pictographic oracle-bone script, to a family chutney recipe.

Come along with David Hinton on a series of walks through the wild beauty of Hunger Mountain, near his home in Vermont—excursions informed by the worldview he’s imbibed from his many years translating the classics of Chinese poetry and philosophy. His broad-ranging discussion offers insight on everything from the mountain landscape to the origins of consciousness and the Cosmos, from geology to Chinese landscape painting, from parenting to pictographic oracle-bone script, to a family chutney recipe. It’s a spiritual ecology that is profoundly ancient and at the same time resoundingly contemporary. Your view of the landscape—and of your place in it—may never be the same.
Comments:
Perdana
I read this book carefully and was wonderfully rewarded, as other reviewers have described. What I can contribute that is different is my disturbance about Hinton's absolute sureness of the Chinese cosmology. There are examples of presence beyond death such as the Tulku tradition in Tibetan Buddhism. Very young children recognize objects belonging to a deceased Lama, which helps to confirm their reincarnation. I come from a non religious and non spiritual family, but at a young age told my mother about an angel who sat at the end of my bed. Examples abound that don't depend on belief and cultural influence. I don't see how these empirical phenomenon can exist within the Chinese cosmology when Hinton states there is no enduring essence. Rather we move in a round of transformation to the next thing. I understand the observation of nature including ourselves is the basis of understanding Tao, but I search for an explanation of how other views can all exist together (the ten thousand things). In closing, I also wished the font and pictographs were larger.

Throw her heart
I used Hunger Mountain as my primary text as I hiked the Camino Sanabres through Spain to Santiago de Compostela. I could not have chosen a better companion. As I walked through the hills of Galicia he was right there with me on his daily hikes up Hunger Mountain. "From nowhere else, occurrence" perfectly captured the way the trail appeared before me and disappeared behind me, the way friendships formed, and mountain mists arose.
After a lifetime of study of Taoist literature, this book, along with Hinton's Existence (which I consider a companion volume) have opened my eyes and my heart to a new appreciation of the wisdom and compassion of these writers.

Slowly writer
Enjoyed exploring Hunger Mountain with David Hinton. I was captivated by his style, which I found ethereal and poetic and lovely. Not having a background in Chinese language or characters , found it hard to be discerning as to the author's true and authentic translation of what the hermit poets of old were trying to say. I appreciated his meanderings , but throughout this beautiful journey, felt I was in David Hinton's travelogue , more than the poets he was trying to embody. A tricky endeavor, to be sure.

SmEsH
This is a great book for anyone interested in the Taoist or Buddhist concept of emptiness. Hinton is a wonderful translator of Classical Chinese literature and in this book shares his own understanding and wisdom as it has grown through the exposure to that body of work. The book is full of rich, vivid writing about nature, poetry, and the Chinese language.

Bad Sunny
"Hunger Mountain" appears to be the culmination of David Hinton's many years as a translator of ancient China's finest, most singular poets. For those seeking a clear-eyed, insightful, poetic explication on the subtle twists of language meets Tao, meets Zen, meets the human mind: "Hunger Mountain" is the place. Hinton has brought to life what often passes as a jangle of abstractions and second hand revelations regarding the nature of the Way, at least in today's "Zen and the art of everything" culture. Simply put, he opens a window into some of the Tao's most arcane subjects while managing to entertain with his own inner-narrative. Worth more than one read.

I love Mercedes
Hunger Mountain is in the Green Mountains of Vermont in the United States. David Hinton, a prize-winning translator of classical Chinese poetry and philosophical works, lives with his family near the mountain and regularly climbs the peak for the purposes of solitude and reflection. His understanding of the worldview of classical Chinese literature informs the way he looks at the mountain. Mountains were significant for ancient Chinese sages and poets because they linked heaven and earth. Many ancients lived as hermits in mountain caves and retreats and their writing and paintings were often inspired by their experiences of communing with nature.

Each of the chapters in this book has a Chinese character or group of characters as its title, with a literal English translation beneath. (Where Hinton does provide a transliteration of the Chinese, he uses the old Wade-Giles system rather than pinyin.) Hinton explores the meanings of the characters, often reaching back to early pictograms that were precursors of classical Chinese script. He sees the pictorial nature of Chinese script as an important element in classical Chinese thought which rejected the dualism of a self reflecting on the world in favour of an empirical perception of the world unmediated by a framework of ideas.

This drive for an immediate community with the empirical world is a fundamental feature of both Taoism and Chan (later Zen) Buddhism. Techniques such as meditation, seclusion, walking in wild places and pondering insoluble riddles were all aimed at overcoming the confines of conscious thought and being at one with the world. Hinton has tried some of these and they influence how he experiences Hunger Mountain. There is a constant feedback loop between those experiences and his translation work, with the latter then informing how he engages with Hunger Mountain.

Metaphor and simile are largely absent from classical Chinese poems because the idea is to present nature as it is. Hinton also discusses poets, often women, who attempted to go beyond the use of words in poetry to try and achieve that direct experience. I could not help thinking how some of their actions would not appear out of place in modern avant garde art shows, though I suspect the motivations in the latter are rather more base.

Hinton discusses the importance of friendship, silence and respect in understanding the world and how these were expressed by the ancient poets and philosophers. Friendship was more about sharing a perception of the world than matching likes and dislikes. Respect for the world and all it encompasses also bred tolerance and acceptance of the ebb and flow of existence. The ancient Chinese used the term `heaven and earth' to express the full extent of existence, including all of us who are part of it. Hinton contrasts this with the dualist approach of Western thinking which sees the world as something apart from humans. I immediately thought of the way we say `I would move heaven and earth to ...' where the world is clearly seen as something `out there' that we need to manipulate rather than something that encompasses all of us as an indivisible whole.

While there are some intriguing ideas in this book and some beautiful, if brief, passages of nature writing, much of the text is dense and complex. There are detailed discussions of Chinese characters and their etymology, and the difficulty of some of the philosophical concepts means that the discussion invariably gets abstract. It is ironic that Hinton, who clearly admires the classical Chinese idea of direct experience of the empirical world unfettered by the chains of language, is himself enmeshed in abstruse terminology and expression in order to get the idea across. The ancient wine-swigging sages would have had a good laugh at that.

Back in the 1960s, the folk singer Donovan sang a song which included the lines `first there is a mountain, then there is no mountain, then there is'. The lines are from Lao Tse and they are a concise statement of what Hinton is getting at: we see the world as a material thing apart from us, then with training that duality is removed and we perceive the cosmos as one, until the final stage where we just accept the empirical world as is, no longer seen through the iron cage of our preconceptions.

I felt that Hinton could have done more to link the concepts he discusses to his experiences on Hunger Mountain. This might have helped to make his ideas more accessible to the general reader. As it is, this is a book that will appeal to those with a specific interest in Chinese culture, philosophy and poetry, and with a stomach for wading through some intricate explanation. If you can make the climb, you will enjoy the view.

Captain America
David Hinton writings are gold. Every subject he touches is transformed in gold and beauty. His connection with landscape and the old China culture is deep and he knows how to touch the essence of existence. I recommend to read whatever he writes, it will be a worth trip into existente/emptiness.

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