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e-Book A Brief History of Anxiety (Yours and Mine) download

e-Book A Brief History of Anxiety (Yours and Mine) download

by Patricia Pearson

ISBN: 0679314989
ISBN13: 978-0679314981
Language: English
Publisher: Random House Canada; 1 edition (March 11, 2008)
Pages: 208
Category: Psychology
Subategory: Medical

ePub size: 1931 kb
Fb2 size: 1621 kb
DJVU size: 1791 kb
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 603
Other Formats: txt lit mbr rtf

A Brief History of Anxiety (Yours & Mine) (. ISBN 978-0-679-31498-1) is a 2008 nonfiction book by Canadian journalist and author Patricia Pearson.

A Brief History of Anxiety (Yours & Mine) (. It is a combination of autobiography, medical history, and social activism that discusses the author's experience with diagnosed anxiety, treatment thereof, the history of mental health treatment in general, and a veteran patient's possible objections to the nature of mental health treatment today.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded on December 23, 2011.

A Brief History of Anxiety' is half-memoir, half-nonfiction work. It roughly chronologically follows Pearson's life, through a couple of anxious/depressive breakdowns, including an interesting, though not really germane to the book's theme, section about working as a crime reporter during the crime-obsessed early '90s. If there's an A quick read. I was excited to read a 'history' of anxiety, but I wanted a more substantial, serious meal than Pearson dishes out: this is more of a light buffet.

Eye-opening, affecting, lucid and constructive, A Brief History of Anxiety is everything you wanted to know about .

Eye-opening, affecting, lucid and constructive, A Brief History of Anxiety is everything you wanted to know about anxiety, but–naturally–were afraid to as. –Quill and Quire. The book is informative and insightful, but also darkly humorous throughout. Insightfully probes one of the oldest and least-understood psychological conditions. A wholly satisfying mix of memoir, cultural history and investigative journalism.

Patricia Pearson returns to non-fiction with a witty, insightful and highly personal look at recognizing and coping with fears and anxieties in our contemporary world. The millions of North Americans who silently cope with anxiety at last have a witty, articulate champion in Patricia Pearson, who shows that the anxious are hardly nervous nellies with weak characters who just need medicine and a pat on the head

But more, I emerged with new views of anxiety - both tools to deal with my own anxiety and to better understand its source

book by Patricia Pearson. New York Times The millions of Americans who silently cope with anxiety at last have a witty, articulate champion. But more, I emerged with new views of anxiety - both tools to deal with my own anxiety and to better understand its source.

A wholly satisfying mix of memoir, cultural history and investigative journalism. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Автор: Pearson Patricia Название: A Brief History of Anxiety.

A brief history of anxiety.

com) devoted to the concerns - the very deep concerns - of people convinced that a worldwide outbreak of influenza is imminent, and that it will make the ravages of the Black Death seem like a mildly unpleasant interlude. A brief history of anxiety.

Fear and anxiety have been thought about and explained in many different ways throughout history. Our understanding of these emotions would be incomplete without a brief look back at older theories of emotions and the roles of anxiety and fear. Discover 30 more articles on this topic. Don't miss these related articles

Patricia Pearson returns to non-fiction with a witty, insightful and highly personal look at recognizing and coping with fears and anxieties in our contemporary world.The millions of North Americans who silently cope with anxiety at last have a witty, articulate champion in Patricia Pearson, who shows that the anxious are hardly “nervous nellies” with “weak characters” who just need medicine and a pat on the head. Instead, Pearson questions what it is about today’s culture that is making people anxious, and offers some surprising answers–as well as some inspiring solutions based on her own fierce battle to drive the beast away. Drawing on personal episodes of incapacitating dread as a vivid, often hilarious guide to her quest to understand this most ancient of human emotions, Pearson delves into the history and geography of anxiety. Why are North Americans so much more likely to suffer than Latin Americans? Why did Darwin treat hypochondria with sprays from a hose? Why have we forgotten the insights of some of our greatest philosophers, theologians and psychologists in favor of prescribing addictive drugs? In this blend of fascinating reportage and poignant memoir, Pearson ends with her struggle to withdraw from antidepressants and to find more self-aware and philosophically-grounded ways to strengthen the soul.
Comments:
Fordregelv
The author eloquently describes what it is like to live with anxiety. I am so happy she shared her experiences. It's so nice to see someone put into words others can understand the anxiety which rules our lives. Bingo!

Ces
The first part of this book grabs some people (see other reviews on this site) but while I found the material engaging enough, I can't say it exactly grabbed me. But the writing was sparky and clever enough that I persevered.

On page 12 she is already wrestling with Kierkegaard's paradox of both wanting freedom from anxiety and at the same time being strangely attracted to the self-creating energy of the anxiety itself. Her blunt suggestion is that anxiety comes from the illusion that we can control what happens to us, and once we let go of that illusion we can start to see that it is flexibility rooted in principles that we need, or in simpler words, we just need to grow up.

She discusses childhood trauma and "anxiety sensitivity" -- that state of fearing the panic attack itself, as much as the original source of fear.

She discusses various therapists and theorists who over time have prescribed what seem to me to be forms of cognitive therapy. Some of this seem pretty insightful.I liked Kurt Goldstein's idea that anxiety is cued off by a threat to some value we hold and think is central to our existence. I liked the idea of Rollo May and Paul Tillich discussing the dread of non-being -- or more specifically the "unease about possessing neither purpose nor impact." "Holy crap I'm a nobody!" That certainly stresses me out the first time I realized it. I was so impressed by this idea that I went out and bought May's book on anxiety.

She discusses the different attitudes toward anxiety in Mexico and China and rightly points out that anxiety tends to be a north western phenomena. Anxiety, it seems, is a luxury of the upper class urban dweller. She at first pins this on the loss of community but concedes that maybe it is the loss of belief in God, or the concept of time, or the simple fact that the more you have to lose the more anxious you get.

There is a discussion of mindset and the suggestion that we might benefit from adopting the attitude of Kenyans who look on their great luck when narrowly avoiding disaster, rather than the disaster itself.

The most repetitive theme in the book, if there is one, is the painful truth that people who believe that events occur randomly -- outside of any larger story or grand design -- are in the worst shape. We need a narrative, some meaning-making explanation, it seems, to stabilize the freaked out Western mind. All that time spent fighting fate makes us more anxious.

By page 134 she rounds on the old chestnut that artists and other creative people are generally flirting most of the time with some form of mental illness. The complex cluster of traits that allows us to think outside the box also allows us to open ourselves to possibilities that others happily bury in their subconscious. The anxious are more fully awake than others.

Finally by page 164 we get a jewel worth the price of the book. Sure we quivering mass of uber-aware "gazers at the dark void beyond illusion" are in desperate need of something to close down our run-away minds, and sure maybe we need a little religion or at the very least ritual, to stabilize our expanding self, but the good news is that we don't have to compromise our creativity or principles to get that. We can circle back and pick up the good things of religion and myth while at the same time making a place at the table for uncertainty and existential questions.

She concludes with Goldstein again, "Courage, in its final analysis, is nothing but an affirmative answer to the shocks of existence, which must be borne for the actualization of one's own nature." The way past or anxiety is through our anxiety. live with it, feel it, keep growing, keep believing in a higher meaning and purpose.

Oh, and forget the drugs.

Celace
As someone who is intimately familiar with anxiety, I found this book to be a helpful balm for understanding the condition. It's helpful to see the malady expressed from someone who suffers from it, particularly in its gory detail - not the same as reading a therapist's description of a patient's symptoms. Although the theories on why so many suffer from anxiety and exactly what to do about it is somewhat murky, I think Pearson covers enough ground to give the anxious person a foothold and a starting point toward living with and coping with the condition, and she does so by giving an overview of anxiety from a historical perspective, interjecting insights from literature as well as psychologists and other practitioners, describing the symptoms and offering various actual examples of anxiety driven behavior. This book offers hope, but not the type offered by a cure-all medication, but rather the type that comes from understanding via reflection and introspection.

LadyShlak
While this book was an interesting and well-written account of the author's own anxiety, I didn't feel that the book really lived up to its title. There were a few sections about anxiety from a historical perspective, but the majority of the book focused on her own life.

The book took a bit of a twist towards the end, when we basically learn that anti-anxiety meds are evil and difficult to get off of. This part is especially weak as no research or stats are presented (unless you consider googling a medication research). I am fine with her having her own opinion about meds, however, it was a one-sided diatribe and didn't offer much perspective.

Not a bad book, but go into it realizing that this isn't really a book about the history of anxiety. It's one person's story.

santa
I don't actually know Patricia Pearson but have interviewed her twice. I totally loved When She Was Bad and was thus excited to read A Brief History of Anxiety. Overall, I enjoyed the book. Pearson is a creative, lively, and skilled writer who possesses keen wit and intelligence. For such a short book there certainly is a great deal of information available here on the topic of anxiety. It is not the first book I've read on the subject but it offered several insights of which I was not previously aware--such as the differences between American and Chinese socialization which result in lower levels of anxiety in eastern mothers and their offspring. The only reason I could not give the book 5 stars is that I felt that too much of it concerned the author. I did ask her about this and she stated essentially that this is to be expected as it is a memoir. Well, that's true if it's a memoir but I did not know this before cracking the spine. Its title, A Brief History of Anxiety [Yours and Mine], caused me to regard it as being more of a dispassionate study of the psychological condition. Perhaps that was a misassumption on my part alone as its autobiographical nature will be intuited by other readers. If it isn't at least I have illuminated its personal focus here. Regardless, spending time with Pearson's pen is always a good use of time.

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