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e-Book The Religious Life of Thomas Jefferson download

e-Book The Religious Life of Thomas Jefferson download

by Charles B. Sanford

ISBN: 0813911311
ISBN13: 978-0813911311
Language: English
Publisher: University of Virginia Press (April 29, 1987)
Pages: 246
Category: Leaders and Notable People
Subategory: Memoris

ePub size: 1346 kb
Fb2 size: 1959 kb
DJVU size: 1924 kb
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 734
Other Formats: mobi lit doc rtf

The religious views of Thomas Jefferson diverged widely from the traditional Christianity of his era. Throughout his life, Jefferson was intensely interested in theology, religious studies, and morality

The religious views of Thomas Jefferson diverged widely from the traditional Christianity of his era. Throughout his life, Jefferson was intensely interested in theology, religious studies, and morality. Jefferson was most comfortable with Deism, rational religion, and Unitarianism. He was sympathetic to and in general agreement with the moral precepts of Christianity

Jefferson has long been recognized as a creative thinker ahead of his time. As this book makes clear, he was deeply interested in religious questions that the passing years have made more important.

Thomas Jefferson and His Library: A study of his literary interests and of the religious attitudes revealed by relevant titles in his library. Religious Life of Thomas Jefferson - profound insight. com User, August 17, 2000. This book is an excellent look at the deep roots of spirituality, not religion, of one of America's most important founders, Thomas Jefferson. The book is both informative and very interesting.

Bibliography of Thomas Jefferson. This Bibliography of Thomas Jefferson is a comprehensive list of published works about Thomas Jefferson, the primary author of the Declaration of Independence and the third President of the United States.

The Religious Life of Thomas Jefferson. By Charles B. Sanford. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1984.

Электронная книга "Doubting Thomas: The Religious Life and Legacy of Thomas Jefferson", Mark A. Beliles, Jerry Newcombe

Электронная книга "Doubting Thomas: The Religious Life and Legacy of Thomas Jefferson", Mark A. Beliles, Jerry Newcombe. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Doubting Thomas: The Religious Life and Legacy of Thomas Jefferson" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Portrait of Thomas Jefferson by Rembrandt Peale in 1800 . The religious views of Thomas Jefferson diverged widely from the orthodox Christianity of his era. He was sympathetic to and in general agreement with the moral precepts of Christianity. He considered the teachings of Jesus as having "the most sublime and benevolent code of morals which has ever been. While the religious views of Washington and Franklin are clear, those of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson are more complicated.

Thomas Jefferson’s religious beliefs have long been a subject of public . See Paul K. Conkin, The Religious Pilgrimage of Thomas Jefferson, in Jeffersonian Legacies, ed.

Thomas Jefferson’s religious beliefs have long been a subject of public discussion, and were a critical topic in several of his important political campaigns as he was viciously and unfairly attacked for alleged atheism. Jefferson took the issue of religion very seriously. This work, entitled by Jefferson The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth, is commonly referred to as the Jefferson Bible.

Sanford, Charles B. The Religious Life of Thomas Jefferson. One could spend whole books trying to explain the body of Jefferson's thought; indeed many scholars have. Shrink wrapped! Internal SKU: D16K-00561.

In this new study we have a comprehensive account of Jefferson's religious thought, one that provides information about his beliefs and practices that will help remove any misconceptions about his religious life.

Jefferson has long been recognized as a creative thinker ahead of his time. As this book makes clear, he was deeply interested in religious questions that the passing years have made more important. Beyond such obvious issues as war and peace, social justice, and racism, he confronted religious and theological problems that have increasingly concerned later religious thinkers.

Comments:
Mave
Sanford writes a well-documented but accessible account of Jefferson's religious ideas. Other books on Jefferson's religion extract his ideas from his letters, papers, and speeches, but Sanford goes deeper, tracing the roots of Jefferson's ideas and the influence Enlightenment philosophers played in shaping his thinking. Sanford's book reveals how Jefferson's ideas about liberty, rights, and democracy sprang from his profound belief in God. Sanford's book also shows the contradictions and complexities of Jefferson's beliefs: that he loved Jesus's teachings even while doubting his divinity, that Jefferson attacked immaterialism in religion while believing in the afterlife, and that he contributed to and regularly attended churches while blasting the corruptions of the church and clergy on the Christian faith. I highly recommend this book to understand Jefferson's religious ideas, but to get historical context for the development of this ideas, I recommend as a companion book. "Sworn on the Altar of God" by Edwin Gaustad. Together the two books give a complete potrait of Jefferson's religious life.

Owomed
Sanford's book is amateurish at best. He makes basic historical errors- criticisms of Jefferson's religion began as early as 1792, not 1803 and the nature of Jefferson's religious convictions was far from ignored by scholars at the time he was writing (1980s). More alarming, however, is that Sanford fails to properly place Jefferson's ideas in their proper historical context. Jefferson was throughout his long life a consummate political being, and to discuss his ideas in a way that neither recognises their political or intellectual context is fatally myopic. The result is a clunky body of work that is at once detailed in its close reading of Jefferson's writing yet also painfully devoid of deep, probing, original thought. The style and format of the book, predictable introductions and conclusions for each chapter, is mechanistic, somewhat reflecting the flatness of Sanford's arguments. All this amounts to a book that reads in the a manner akin to a rushed dissertation. Useful as an introduction to Jefferson's religious views, but scholars will surely be disappointed.

Nuadador
One of my favorite books that has helped challenge and shape my spiritual and philosophical outlooks on life. Sanford goes to great length explaining and detailing Thomas Jefferson's views on controversial topics such as the right and nature of Man, nature of God, separation of church and state, religious freedom, deism, Christianity, materialism, morality, and the afterlife. Sanford provides many citations, including Jefferson's personal letters, diaries, personal Jeffersonian Bible, and other primary sources. Sanford carefully places Jefferson's views in historical and cultural context, but yet there's no sugarcoating anything here. It's a great read and I recommend it for any open-minded and mature individual interested in learning about the beliefs that motivated Jefferson and our founding Fathers to create the US Constitituion and a free society.

Thoginn
This book is an excellent look at the deep roots of spirituality, not religion, of one of America's most important founders, Thomas Jefferson.
The book is both informative and very interesting. It's a great book to keep for future reference as well.
It points out that Jefferson, like many of America's key founders, was not a Christian, but was a Deist. That is, he believed in God based on reason and nature, not on the Bible, Torah or Koran or any other man made book.
This is a book that will stimulate your brain and cause you to expand your mind!
Robert L. Johnson

Fenrikasa
This book is a complete nonsense. Sanford is NOT a historian. He is a christian minister spouting what is clearly contrived christian propaganda lamely attempting to add to the mythology that the founding fathers were all god-fearing christians who founded the US on christian principles. Which, of course, is absolutely NOT true. Jefferson's ideas about duty, justice, government, and democracy came from his passion for Greek, Roman and contemporary philosophy. It is baseless and ridiculous to claim those ideas came from Jefferson's "religious" views. Many of the key founding fathers were deists who simply did not believe in a living god who intervened in the affairs of men. And there is more than ample evidence to be found by anyone who really wants the truth that Jefferson and others held no superstitious beliefs whatsoever and even condemned christianity. In a letter to Adams (in the archives) Jefferson even says,"Christianity is the greatest abomination ever perpetrated upon humanity." And in his reply Adams seems to agree with him. There are quite a few other letters that give us similar information about the founding fathers. There is plenty of verifiable evidence available to any thinking, discerning person that demonstrate how Sanford's claims in this book are simply not supported by historical facts. Sanford is either deeply deluded, horribly misinformed or just trying to make a fast buck by telling christians exactly what they want to hear. No honest, rational person could examine the evidence and still think Jefferson was a "believer". He simply was NOT. What many christians don't want to understand is that in their public affairs the founding fathers gave lip service to god and chritianity, just like politicians do today. It means absolutely nothing to say that some founding fathers mentioned 'god' in their public speeches. Another good example of this is FDR. He never seemed to miss the chance to invoke god in his public life. But years after his death, a close friend wrote that FDR thought christianity, and all other religions, were foolish nonsense. Christians have a right to believe in god if they so choose. I will even defend their right to do so. And no doubt christianity has had some certain amount of influence on our nation throughout the course of its history. But christians do not serve themselves well, or anyone else, when they grossly exaggerate that influence - especially when it comes to a well documented subject like the founding fathers. Anyone can research this and see for themselves. It's not necessary to take anyone's word for it. I really don't understand the christian's near psychotic need to rewrite all of history and try to refashion everything to suit their own wishful thinking. There was a time when christianity did rule the world -- it's known as the Dark Ages.

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