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e-Book Party in the Blitz download

e-Book Party in the Blitz download

by Elias. CANETTI

ISBN: 1843432048
ISBN13: 978-1843432043
Language: English
Publisher: HARVILL PRESS; First British Edition edition (2005)
Pages: 272
Category: Memoirs
Subategory: Memoris

ePub size: 1292 kb
Fb2 size: 1530 kb
DJVU size: 1392 kb
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 210
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Peter Conradi finds Elias Canetti's recollections of Iris Murdoch in Party in the Blitz awash with bile, backstabbing . Elias Canetti arrived in England in 1939, fleeing Hitler, with his wife and (soon) two mistresses.

Peter Conradi finds Elias Canetti's recollections of Iris Murdoch in Party in the Blitz awash with bile, backstabbing and envy. He was known in his adoptive Vienna for a single novel Auto-da-Fé, a black comedy of justified paranoia and misogyny. In England he boasted one reader only, sinologist Arthur Waley.

Elias Canetti originally intended Party in the Blitz to capture an image of his time in post-war London. Well known throughout Europe, Canetti scorned British intellectuals who weren’t familiar with his work. By force of will alone he accumulated English followers, but not before being christened the godmonster of Hampstead. Canetti’s memories of various people in his Elias Canetti originally intended Party in the Blitz to capture an image of his time in post-war London.

PARTY IN THE BLITZ is the great man's last piss-blast in the face of a world he saw as hostile, stupid, and bent on destruction. The price of this book is justified alone by what Canetti says about . Elliot was one of the biggest anti-semites of all time, a cold prude who hated Jews, wrote bad pretentious poetry so arcane it needed footnotes (which he himself supplied), and desperately wanted to be an Englishman when in fact he was from St. Louis, Missouri

Party in the Blitz has to be understood in the context of the previous . Party im Blitz is the fragmentary memoir of Elias Canetti's "English years", at least the early ones, from the late 1930s to the 1950s.

Party in the Blitz has to be understood in the context of the previous volumes of Canetti’s memoirs ) Party in the Blitz is thus much more than a set of incisive but unrelated portraits; it is the culmination of Canetti’s exile narrative - a narrative completed, hard as it is to believe, by an eighty-seven-year old man, still swinging that axe at his detractors. Marjorie Perloff, Bookforum. O)ne cannot read the book without echoing the opinion that Canetti was a horrible ma. - Frank Kermode, The New Republic. Well known throughout Europe, Canetti scorned British intellectuals who weren't familiar with his work. By force of will alone he accumulated English followers, but not before being christened "the godmonster of Hampstead. Canetti's memories of various people in his social circle are brief and scathing brimstone sketches. Eliot, Iris Murdoch, Wittgenstein, Herbert Read, Bertrand Russell-Canetti rakes them all over the coals.

Find sources: "Elias Canetti" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (December . Party im Blitz; Die englischen Jahre 2003 (Party in the Blitz, memoir, published posthumously, tr.

Find sources: "Elias Canetti" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (December 2010) (Learn how and when to remove this template message). Canetti moved to England in 1938 after the Anschluss to escape Nazi persecution. He became a British citizen in 1952. He is known as a modernist novelist, playwright, memoirist, and non-fiction writer. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1981, "for writings marked by a broad outlook, a wealth of ideas and artistic power". He is noted for his non-fiction book Crowds and Power, among other works. 2005).

Elias Canetti escaped from Hitler’s Germany to London in 1939, and disliked it very much. He was 34, and had gained some renown back home for his novel Auto da Fe. But the English had no idea who he was, and he found their cold-hearted indifference a torture

Elias Canetti escaped from Hitler’s Germany to London in 1939, and disliked it very much. But the English had no idea who he was, and he found their cold-hearted indifference a torture. At literary parties in Hampstead he felt sure they were eyeing him contemptuously. They addressed him, if at all, with icy politeness which, he was convinced, was their way of insulting foreigners and other nobodies

Canetti started work on his England memoirs in 1985. Four separate drafts were begun, of which this book, unfinished at the time of his death in 1994, is the product

Canetti started work on his England memoirs in 1985. Four separate drafts were begun, of which this book, unfinished at the time of his death in 1994, is the product. Restrictive covenants in Canetti's will prevented the publication of his manuscripts and papers for a time, but PARTY IN THE BLITZ was finally published in German in 2003. In this sensational collection of portraits of those who were meaningful in his life, Canetti is an honest and often cruel observer of the personalities of those around him. T S Eliot, he believed, was an embodiment of the grip of decline in which English.

Party in the Blitz : The English Years. Canetti recounts with rage and contempt his association with some of Britain's most famous literati, including . Eliot and Iris Murdoch.

Living in Hampstead, Canetti was well-placed to observe the cultured elite of wartime . The episodic form of the book owes much to Aubrey, too, an. .

Living in Hampstead, Canetti was well-placed to observe the cultured elite of wartime London. Canetti voices a wish at one point to write a book about England like that of John Aubrey, the 17th-century antiquarian and gossip whose sketches of character were published as Brief Lives, and parts of this work show the same eye for glancing incidental detail: Enoch Powell quoting "great chunks" of Nietzsche at parties; Bernard Russell's laugh like "the cackle.

A stunning and unexpected new volume of Elias Canetti's autobiography. A surprise gift to celebrate the Nobel Laureate's 100th birthday.Nobel Prize winner Elias Canetti, at 85, beset by the desire to come to terms with his years of exile in Britain, wrote Party in the Blitz. He waited half a century to confront these memories, perhaps because "in order to be truthful, I should have to track down every needless humiliation I was offered in England, and relive it as the torture it was." Party in the Blitz dissects that torture with unrestrained acerbity, recounting the ordeal of being in a new country where not a soul knew his writing. But not one to be ignored, "the godmonster of Hempstead" (as John Bayley dubbed Canetti) soon knew everyone and everyone knew him. Enoch Powell, Bertrand Russell, Iris Murdoch, Empson, Wittgenstein, Kokoshka, Kathleen Raine, Henry Moore, Ralph Vaughn Williams: Canetti knew them all, and in Party in the Blitz he mercilessly rakes some of them over the coals. He detested T.S. Eliot and came to bitterly despise Iris Murdoch, with whom he had an affair: Every word of his devastating portrait of her quivers with rage. "He must have been a frequent party-goer," as Jeremy Adler remarks in his excellent afterword, "to judge by the well-informed distaste with which he recalls them." Gorgeously translated by Michael Hofmann, Party in the Blitz lives up to Canetti's injunction that "when you write down your life, every page should contain something no one has ever heard about."
Comments:
Kadar
I worship the late Elias Canetti. If nobody's heard of him, it's because we live in a culture that is fundamentally ignorant and under-educated. CROWDS AND POWER should be required reading in every school in this nation. Canetti's cycle of memoirs collectively comprises some of the best intellectual history of the twentieth century. PARTY IN THE BLITZ is the great man's last piss-blast in the face of a world he saw as hostile, stupid, and bent on destruction. The price of this book is justified alone by what Canetti says about T.S. Elliot. Elliot was one of the biggest anti-semites of all time, a cold prude who hated Jews, wrote bad pretentious poetry so arcane it needed footnotes (which he himself supplied), and desperately wanted to be an Englishman when in fact he was from St. Louis, Missouri. Canetti recognized what a sham Elliot was, and doesn't hesitate to let us know what Elliot was really like, through the eyes of an objective observer and not some fawning Catholic biographer.

It's true that Canetti rips just about everyone to shreds in this book, but he has some amazingly kind things to say, too. He remembers, for instance, a mere street sweeper, who he talked to just in passing for many years, and whom he considered one of the most intelligent men he ever met. Canetti was a man who refused to suffer fools; he despised airs and pretentiousness. He was probably one of the most intelligent men of his age, which was almost certainly his great curse. He saw through the masks people wear, the illusions they use to disguise their flaws and insecurities, with ease. It was this great lucidity of his, this ability to perceive and understand things as they really are, that made him impatient, and ultimately, incredibly bitter.

Scoreboard Bleeding
I would wager that this is a Nobel Prize winning author most Americans (including me, prior to reading this book) have not heard of, let alone read. And from this memoir of that part of his life while living in England-- mostly during World War II--, it will probably stay that way.

Elias Canetti comes off as an arrogant, dour, and self-centered intellectual with brutal views of some women and fellow authors and no discernable concern that-- apparently-- he made no meaningful contribution to the war effort of that good country which hosted and protected him during a time of extreme trials.

He seems to me an example of the type of high intellectual who thinks nothing of being utterly cruel toward individuals in print, then wonders why countries so stupidly go to war.

From this patched together book, one can appreciate the essence of Mr.Canetti's fine writing skills without being brought to liking this now deceased author.

The useful afterword by Jeremy Adler is very good in that it puts both the book and the author into some context for the non-expert reader.

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