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e-Book Richard Milhous Nixon: The Rise of an American Politician download

e-Book Richard Milhous Nixon: The Rise of an American Politician download

by Roger Morris

ISBN: 0805018344
ISBN13: 978-0805018349
Language: English
Publisher: Henry Holt & Co; First Paperback Edition edition (November 1, 1991)
Pages: 1005
Subategory: Memoris

ePub size: 1277 kb
Fb2 size: 1406 kb
DJVU size: 1413 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 535
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Weighing in at over 1,000 pages, Richard Milhous Nixon: The Rise of an. .Roger Morris has a good way of painting the historical background of others in a way that can be quite interesting and challenging to those who find it exciting to see what was going on in other lives

Weighing in at over 1,000 pages, Richard Milhous Nixon: The Rise of an American Politician is undoubtedly the most detailed single volume on the political career of the disgraced ex-president. But the events in this book take place decades before the Watergate scandal, in an era when many were unsure whether Nixon might ever climb to heights of power from which to topple. Roger Morris has a good way of painting the historical background of others in a way that can be quite interesting and challenging to those who find it exciting to see what was going on in other lives. The timing (in receiving the book) was good.

Morris argues that this first campaign is the start of an inverse relationship ethics and political success in Nixon's career. The Nixon-Douglas race did, however, contribute to some of the better political one-liners in history. That is, the higher Nixon rose in politics, the less he cared about the methods he used to get there. While this assertion might be true, Nixon in 1946 was nowhere near the cutting edge of mudslinging that Morris would have us believe. In his shorter and much better biography of Nixon, historian Stephen Ambrose points out that Senator William Knowland, a man Morris sees as a Paragon of virtue, was actually far dirtier than Nixon ever was against Voorhis.

Roger Morris, born 1937, is an American historian, foreign policy analyst, and journalist. He served on the staff of the National Security Council under the presidencies of both Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon. As an author he has won fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Society of American Historians and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Richard Milhous Nixon book. The first of a projected three-volume biography of Richard Nixon, this National Book Award finalist covers the years from his birth in 1913 through the campaign of 1952, in which Nixon became Vice President under Eisenhower. A massive, powerful biography.

Finalist, National Book Awards 1990 for Nonfiction. More about this author . ISBN 978-0805011210 Henry Holt & Co. Roger Morris. Get This BOOK. His biography of Nixon, Richard Milhous Nixon: The Rise of an American Politician, was short-listed for the National Book Award. He served as a senior fellow of the Green Institute. His major works include: Uncertain Greatness: Henry Kissinger and American Foreign Policy.

Roger Morris, Author of Richard Milhous Nixon: The Rise of an American Politician.

Conservative Intellectuals and Richard Nixon explores the relationship between postwar conservatives and the president from 1968 to 1974. Seemingly casting those years out of their history, conservatives have never fully explored how Richard Nixon affected their movement. They fail to realize the extent his presidency helped refocus their fight against liberalism and communism. Mergel uses the Nixon years as a window into the Right s effort to turn ideology into successful politics. Roger Morris, Author of Richard Milhous Nixon: The Rise of an American Politician. Mergel displays an amazing grasp of the thinking of conservative intellectuals.

Weighing in at over 1,000 pages, Richard Milhous Nixon: The Rise of an American Politician is undoubtedly the most . Roger Morris' book covers the life of Richard Nixon through his 1952 election to the Vice-Presidency.

Weighing in at over 1,000 pages, Richard Milhous Nixon: The Rise of an American Politician is undoubtedly the most detailed single volume on the political career o. Most of the book focuses on the years 1946-52, covering five pivotal episodes in Nixon's career 1)His 1946 House campaign against Jerry Voorhis, 2) the Hiss case, 3) his 1950 Senate campaign against Helen Gahagan Douglas, 4) his role in the 1952 Republican convention, and 5) the 1952 campaign with emphasis on the "secret fund" scandal that culminated with the.

Roger Morris served on the senior staff of the National Security Council under Presidents Johnson and Nixon, until he.

Roger Morris served on the senior staff of the National Security Council under Presidents Johnson and Nixon, until he resigned over the invasion of Cambodia. He is the author of several books on history and politics, including Richard Milhous Nixon: The Rise of an American Politician, which was short listed for both a National Book Award and a National Book Critics Circle Award.

Too, Morris is somewhat more critical than Ambrose of Nixon's first 40 years. Perhaps overdoing it, Morris spends 250 pages-a book in its own right-on the Hiss case. Morris places heavier emphasis on the frenzied local political activity of Nixon in the post-Duke, prewar years of 1939-40-activity that Nixon, and even his mother, minimized (perhaps because his fledgling political steps ended in failure). Ambrose, on the other hand, was overly admiring of a young Nixon whose superiority seduced every organization he joined into elected him its leader.

Chronicles Nixon's rise to political prominence, from his pre-World War II government service to his under-the-table stab at the vice-presidency in 1952, in the first of a projected three-volume biography
Comments:
BoberMod
This book is the best I've read about the beginning (and middle) of Richard Nixon's life. Like all great biographies, Morris spends time on the individuals surrounding Nixon -- fully illuminating a host of characters such as Helen Douglas, Whitaker Chambers, Alger Hiss, Dwight Eisenhower. I found myself learning just as much about them as I did about Nixon himself. To me, that is the critical difference between Stephen Ambrose's work and that by Morris. Whereas Ambrose's trilogy (also excellent) covers Nixon closely, this book covers him a bit more loosely to show how hard it was to truly know him (and what drove him).

My only regret about this work is that there isn't a second volume to cover his later years. I have no doubt Morris would do an exceptional job of covering his presidency and post-presidency years as well.

Kazijora
There is a lot of early Nixon biography. Nixon's ancestry is traced to Germans living in Ireland. Then his early struggles and his hard work in school and in the family grocery store. His first loss was in a legal lawsuit, which cost his law firm a bundle of money; his first business venture in Citra-Frost was another costly mistake; however, like a bucking bronco, he never gave up and his hard work won the respect from both friend and foe.
I have only read the first seven chapters, but I highly recommend this book to all Nixon fans. I also recommend it to all students of American history and presidents. If you have not become a Nixon admirer by just reading the first few chapters, then there is something terribly wrong with you.

Ohatollia
I enjoyed reading about richard nixon and about what cuased him to be impeached and his long road to becoming president.

Ishnsius
Very happy with this purchase. The book is in excellent condition, arrived promptly and has found its place among all my treasured books.

Iaiastta
Very insightful book, even though Watergate is barely mentioned.

MrCat
Before beginning this review, the reader should be made aware of some facts about the author of this book. Morris was a National Security Council staff member during the Nixon years. Nixon and National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger had his phones tapped. Morris resigned his position in protest following the invasion of Cambodia. Since then he has written biographies of Kissinger, General Alexander Haig, and now Nixon.
The reader watches young Nixon grow up in a relatively prosperous family. Despite the future president's claims of poverty, the family sent to sons to college and owned a car during the depression. There were limits to the Nixons' finances. Richard was smart enough to win admission to Harvard, but his family could not afford to send him East. Despite the death of two brothers, Nixon's home was a supportive, nurturing environment. Yet, as hone high school friend noted, Richard was "admired rather than liked."
After the war, Nixon and his wife, Pat, dreaded returning to small town life. As a result, the interest a group of community leaders showed in him as a candidate to take on Congressman Jerry Voorhis was a godsend. According to Morris, this election marks the start of red-baiting in American politics and in Nixon's career. Voorhis and Nixon would later downplay the role of red-baiting in this election for very different reasons. Morris argues that this first campaign is the start of an inverse relationship ethics and political success in Nixon's career. That is, the higher Nixon rose in politics, the less he cared about the methods he used to get there. While this assertion might be true, Nixon in 1946 was nowhere near the cutting edge of mudslinging that Morris would have us believe. In his shorter and much better biography of Nixon, historian Stephen Ambrose points out that Senator William Knowland, a man Morris sees as a Paragon of virtue, was actually far dirtier than Nixon ever was against Voorhis.
Encouraged by his congressional victory, Nixon gravitates more and more towards the anti-Communist right wing. He eagerly sought and gained a seat on the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC). Morris clearly exaggerates Nixon's influence when he contends that a freshman congressman had enough power to intimidate Hollywood into making anti-Communist films and artistically inhibiting filmmakers for a decade. Nixon and HUAC soon hit pay dirt when they stumbled upon on one of the few incidents of a communist actually holding a high position in the U.S. government. The FBI leaked to the committee the testimony of Whitaker Chambers, an editor with Time-Life, in which he accused former State Department official Alger Hiss of spying for the Soviet Union. That these accusations were taken seriously Morris argues is a sign of how strong the anti-Communist witch hunt was in America. Chambers had made the charges before, but only at a time when red-baiting was acceptable political tool would they be taken seriously. Morris contends that Hiss was innocent of the charges hurled at him, but the evidence he offers simply does not support his case. In addition, a good deal of material declassified in the last ten years here and in the former Soviet Union shows Hiss was as dirty as his detractors claimed.
Intoxicated with his success, Nixon decides to run for the U.S. Senate against Helen Douglas. Once again he uses his favorite tactic and once again he destroys another respectable career. In a moment of pure hyperbole, Morris characterizes this race as "the most notorious, controversial campaign in American political history." In making this statement, he ignores the Presidential elections of 1824, 1876, 1968 and U.S. Senate Races in Texas in 1948 and in North Carolina in 1984. The Nixon-Douglas race did, however, contribute to some of the better political one-liners in history. Nixon said Douglas was "pink right down to her underwear" and Douglas called Nixon "Tricky Dick." Only in 1952 with the slush fund controversy would Nixon get a taste of his own medicine.
There are many problems with this biography. The first is its length. Morris could have easily trimmed 200 pages without damage to his narrative. Ambrose covers the same period and 10 additional years with 250 fewer pages. Another problem is his habit of making over arching indictiments against Nixon. The biggest shortcoming, though, is Morris's portrayal of his subject. He sees Nixon as a crude, ambitious, paranoid politician with few scruples. That Nixon had these traits is beyond question. Morris unfortunately overlooks the complexity of Nixon's personality. Nixon had the capacity to be generous, thoughtful and compassionate. The portrayal in this book is most unrewarding.

Vut
Enjoyed reading the book by the same author who wrote books on tow other Presents, T. Roosevelt, and Ronald Reagan.
Roger Morris has a good way of painting the historical background of others in a way that can be quite interesting and challenging to those who find it exciting to see what was going on in other lives.

The timing (in receiving the book) was good.

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