pbstudio
e-Book The Saddam Tapes: The Inner Workings of a Tyrant's Regime, 1978-2001 download

e-Book The Saddam Tapes: The Inner Workings of a Tyrant's Regime, 1978-2001 download

by David D. Palkki,Mark E. Stout,Kevin M. Woods

ISBN: 1107016851
ISBN13: 978-1107016859
Language: English
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (September 26, 2011)
Pages: 392
Category: Humanities
Subategory: Other

ePub size: 1336 kb
Fb2 size: 1871 kb
DJVU size: 1919 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 637
Other Formats: docx mobi doc txt

In his previous books Kevin Woods has established himself as the foremost authority on the military aspects of the Saddam era in Iraq. This is the icing on the cake.

In his previous books Kevin Woods has established himself as the foremost authority on the military aspects of the Saddam era in Iraq. In The Saddam Tapes, Woods allows the reader to explore most of Saddam's major decisions by listening in to the tyrant's actual discussions.

including 10 plates) & tables, 2. 1. . cm, paper cover, £. 0, 1986. Volume 15 Issue 3 - Jean M. Dixon.

The collection has implications for a range of historical questions. Kevin M. Woods, David D. Palkki, Mark E. Stout. Cambridge University Press, 26 сент.

Saddam Hussein spoke these words to his inner circle in the midst of Iraq’s war with Iran in the 1980s, almost two decades before the United States finally overthrew him in 2003.

The Inner Workings of a Tyrant's Regime, 1978–2001 . Saddam versus the inspectors: the impact of regime security on the verification of Iraq’s WMD disarmament. Journal of Strategic Studies, Vol. 41, Issue. Publisher: Cambridge University Press. Online publication date: June 2012.

See if your friends have read any of David D. Palkki's books. The Saddam Tapes: The Inner Workings of a Tyrant's Regime, 1978-2001 by. David D. Palkki’s Followers. None yet. Palkki. Palkki’s books.

Woods, Kevin M. Other Authors: Palkki, David . Stout, Mark . FOUR: Qadisiyyah Saddam (The Iran-Iraq War). Our victory will be a historic one: from invasion to retreat (1979-1981). Stout, Mark E. Format: eBook. People used to dream about such wonderful ideas: seven years in the trenches (1981-1987). This bloody route has taken eight long years: aborting al-qadisiyyah (1987-1988). FIVE: The Mother of All Battles. Returning the branch to the tree: reunification and pacification. Preparing for and enduring the coalition AIR campaign.

20Woods & David%20D.

Are you sure you want to report the file Kevin M. Woods & David D. Palkki & Mark E Stout-The Saddam Tapes The Inner Workings of a Tyrant's Regime, 1978-. 20Woods & David%20D. 20Palkki & %20Saddam%20Tapes %. Michael X. Delli Carpini-After Broadcast News Media Regimes, Democracy, and the New Information Environment (Communication, Society and Politics) Paperback 931. 10 months ago. 10. 5.

The regime saw Israel as a constant threat and held anti-Semitic views.

The book specifically focuses upon recordings of Saddam and his top advisers, usually at meetings of the Revolutionary Command Council or cabinet. Those tapes both confirm and dispel many of the stereotypes built up about Saddam over all the years he was in power. The regime saw Israel as a constant threat and held anti-Semitic views.

During the 2003 war that ended Saddam Hussein's regime, coalition forces captured thousands of hours of secret recordings of meetings, phone calls, and conferences. Originally prepared by the Institute for Defense Analyses for the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Policy, this study presents annotated transcripts of Iraqi audio recordings of meetings between Saddam Hussein and his inner circle. The Saddam Tapes, along with the much larger digital collection of captured records at the National Defense University's Conflict Records Research Center, will provide researchers with important insights into the inner workings of the regime and, it is hoped, the nature of authoritarian regimes more generally. The collection has implications for a range of historical questions. How did Saddam react to the pressures of his wars? How did he manage the Machiavellian world he created? How did he react to the signals and actions of the international community on matters of war and peace? Was there a difference between the public and the private Saddam on critical matters of state? A close examination of this material in the context of events and other available evidence will address these and other questions.
Comments:
Gadar
The Saddam Tapes, The Inner Workings of a Tyrant’s Regime 1978-2001 was the first book to use the wealth of captured documents and tapes seized after the 2003 invasion of Iraq. The book specifically focuses upon recordings of Saddam and his top advisers, usually at meetings of the Revolutionary Command Council or cabinet. Those tapes both confirm and dispel many of the stereotypes built up about Saddam over all the years he was in power. For example, he considered himself an expert on all kinds of affairs even if he didn't really know about them, he believed in conspiracies about the United States and Jews-Israel, but he was not a madman and he was not surrounded by a bunch of yes men. While his inner circle did not always pass along bad news there was actually lively debate and long discussions on most issues. While the transcripts do not all invoke the same interest, they do provide a first hand and inside account of Saddam’s government.

The book covers 8 topics: relations with the U.S. the Arab world and Israel, the Iran-Iraq War, the Gulf War, weapons of mass destruction and nuclear weapons, United Nations inspectors and sanctions, and the defection of Hussein Kamal, Saddam’s son in law. Each section comes with a brief intro, and then a series of transcripts of discussions on each issue. Not all of them are engaging, but there are a lot of good morsels contained within them.

For one, Saddam never trusted the United States. Even when the Reagan administration decided to re-engage with Baghdad during the Iran-Iraq War, Saddam believed it was helping Iran. That was because the Americans had previous backed Iran, Israel and the Kurds in the 1970s, and he thought the U.S. was behind the Iranian Revolution. His fears were confirmed by the Iran-Contra Affair. These ideas continued through the Gulf War to the U.N. sanctions and U.N. weapons inspectors. At the same time, the Iraqi inner circle had a hard time understanding Washington politics. They would discuss things like elections and White House decision making, but had no real idea how they affected U.S. foreign policy. For example, Tariq Aziz speculated that the 1st President Bush would start another war with Iraq to win a second term.

The regime saw Israel as a constant threat and held anti-Semitic views. Saddam believe that the infamous Protocols of Zion were real and in the mid-1990s there were several meetings where he told his advisers to read and study the Protocols so they could understand Israel and how the Jewish mind worked. Saddam asked Iraqi intelligence to find out whether U.N. Secretary General Boutros Bourtros-Ghali had a Jewish wife and mother, and one of his aides told him that because New York City was Jewish and the U.N.’s Javier Perez de Cuella lived there he would fall under Zionist influence. Saddam saw weapons of mass destruction and nuclear weapons as the ultimate deterrent to Israel. In the 1990s he claimed that Iraq’s WMD had created an umbrella to protect all the Arab capitals from an Israeli attack. He also thought that if Iraq gained a nuclear bomb, it could lead a successful war against Israel.

There are also insights into the invasion of Kuwait-Gulf War-1991 uprising. In one meeting of the Baath Party in 1990 Izzat al-Duri said that Kuwait was conspiring against Iraq, and that was part of a larger conspiracy of Israel to destroy the country. After the invasion, Saddam ordered his forces to loot the entire country and kill and maim any Kuwaiti that stood in their way. Later after he was captured by the Americans and interrogated by the FBI he would deny that he gave any such instructions. Saddam never took the U.S.-led Coalition threat seriously. During one discussion, he said that all the U.S. would do was bomb Iraq and that would mean little. After the Gulf War, he considered himself the victor because he remained in power and bragged that Iraq had faced so many countries in a war and survived. He claimed that Iraq’s fighting spirit defeated the Americans, which was a theme he would bring up again when the 2003 invasion came. Finally, the 1991 uprising was seen as a combination of the low morale of the Iraqi forces after the Gulf War, and Iran’s plotting.

Finally, the tapes show that Iraq destroyed its WMD stockpiles and stopped its programs and its nuclear effort in 1991, but never came fully clean about it to the U.N. inspectors. There were meetings where Saddam and his staff discussed how they would not initially declare their biological weapons program, how Iraq sought to create crises with the U.N. to try to negotiate better terms, and how they hoped to use France and Russia to end the inspections and sanctions. That was because it feared that the inspectors were working for the United States, and Washington would never agree to ending sanctions no matter what Baghdad said because it wanted regime change. This meant the U.N. could never verify Iraq’s disarmament. That would come to haunt it as that was part of the main argument of the Bush administration to invade and overthrow Saddam in 2003. It’s deceptions in the 90s were why the White House didn’t trust the new round of inspections that started in 2002 as well.

The major issue with the book is that while it provides all this information, the reader has to go through dozens and dozens of pages to find it. There are some sections that are much better than others, and some, like the final chapter on the defection of Hussein Kamal that includes talk about him being mentally unstable and various officials claiming they never trusted him, which should have not been included. All the talk shows that Saddam was not an autocrat who made all his decisions by himself, but rather his aides, ministers, etc. contributed to discussions and even disagreed with him at times. On the other hand, it’s not always fun to read through all of it. Overall, that means The Saddam Tapes is for the real Iraq enthusiasts, analysts and historians rather than the general reader.

fire dancer
Incomprehensible material. Often, ciritical words are "inaudible". Great effort, to be sure, but not much good came off it.

Nalmergas
In his previous books Kevin Woods has established himself as the foremost authority on the military aspects of the Saddam era in Iraq. This is the icing on the cake. In The Saddam Tapes, Woods allows the reader to explore most of Saddam's major decisions by listening in to the tyrant's actual discussions. Woods has made some first rate selections from the available evidence, and for anyone truly desiring to understand the American involvement in Iraq over the past two decades this book is a must read. It is also a once in a life-time intimate look into the complex thinking of a brutal dictator, as he tries to navigate his policies in the most dangerous region of the world.

ISBN: 0786167742
ISBN13: 978-0786167746
language: English
Subcategory: Leaders and Notable People
ISBN: 0307394026
ISBN13: 978-0307394026
language: English
Subcategory: Memoirs
ISBN: 0195080750
ISBN13: 978-0195080759
language: English
Subcategory: Social Sciences
ISBN: 0312131690
ISBN13: 978-0312131692
language: English
Subcategory: True Crime
e-Book The War over Iraq download

The War over Iraq epub fb2

by Lawrence F Kaplan,Robert Whitfield,William Kristol
ISBN: 0786192259
ISBN13: 978-0786192250
language: English
Subcategory: Politics and Government
ISBN: 0801441692
ISBN13: 978-0801441691
language: English
Subcategory: Social Sciences
ISBN: 1845194675
ISBN13: 978-1845194673
language: English
Subcategory: Humanities
ISBN: 000653113X
ISBN13: 978-0006531135
language: English
Subcategory: Military
ISBN: 0813563534
ISBN13: 978-0813563534
language: English
Subcategory: Politics and Government
ISBN: 9051212585
ISBN13: 978-9051212587
language: Dutch