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e-Book The Moral Theology of Pope John Paul II (Moral Traditions) download

e-Book The Moral Theology of Pope John Paul II (Moral Traditions) download

by Charles E. Curran

ISBN: 1589010426
ISBN13: 978-1589010420
Language: English
Publisher: Georgetown University Press; 2nd prt. edition (January 6, 2005)
Pages: 264
Category: Humanities
Subategory: Other

ePub size: 1410 kb
Fb2 size: 1836 kb
DJVU size: 1951 kb
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 689
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Catholic moral theology is a major category of doctrine in the Catholic Church, equivalent to a religious ethics.

Catholic moral theology is a major category of doctrine in the Catholic Church, equivalent to a religious ethics. Moral theology encompasses Roman Catholic social teaching, Catholic medical ethics, sexual ethics, and various doctrines on individual moral virtue and moral theory. It can be distinguished as dealing with "how one is to act", in contrast to dogmatic theology which proposes "what one is to believe".

The Moral Theology of Pope John Paul II (Washington: Georgetown . Charles E. Curran (April 1999). The Catholic moral tradition today. Georgetown University Press.

The Moral Theology of Pope John Paul II (Washington: Georgetown University Press, 2005). Catholic Social Teaching 1891–Present: A Historical, Theological, and Ethical Analysis (Washington: Georgetown University Press, 2002). The Catholic Moral Tradition Today: A Synthesis (Washington: Georgetown University Press, 1999). The Origins of Moral Theology in the United States: Three Different Approaches (Washington: Georgetown University Press, 1997).

Pope John Paul II is the second longest serving pope in history and the longest serving pope of the last century. His presence has thrown a long shadow across our time, and his influence on Catholics and non-Catholics throughout the world cannot be denied. Much has been written about this pope, but until now, no one has provided a systematic and thorough analysis of the moral theology that underlies his moral teachings and its astonishing influence. And no one is better positioned to do this than Charles E. Curran, widely recognized as the leading American Catholic moral theologian.

In this magisterial volume Charles E. Curran surveys the historical development of Catholic moral . Curran surveys the historical development of Catholic moral theology in the United States from its 19th century roots to the present da. He is the author of Loyal Dissent: Memoir of a Catholic Theologian, The Moral Theology of Pope John Paul II and Catholic Social Teaching, 1891-Present, all published by Georgetown University Press.

Curran's book, The Moral Theology of Pope John Paul II, seeks to uncover and substantiate the root of their agreements and disagreements. This article seeks to evaluate Curran's theory. This analysis is done in two parts: first, an examination of the evidence that Curran presents to support his charge against the pope, and second, an examination of the alternative possibility that it is Curran who has the double methodology rather than the pope. No keywords specified (fix it).

Moral theology, Christian theological discipline concerned with identifying and .

Moral theology, Christian theological discipline concerned with identifying and elucidating the principles that determine the quality of human behaviour in the light of Christian revelation. It is distinguished from the philosophical discipline of ethics, which relies upon the authority of reason. Moral theology appeals to the authority of revelation, specifically as found in the preaching and activity of Jesus Christ. ethics: Christian ethics from the New Testament to the Scholastics.

The Apostle Paul in Arabia.

Charles E. Curran, The Moral Theology of Pope John Paul II. Moral Traditions Series. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press, 2005. The Apostle Paul in Arabia. Stephen's Defense before the Sanhedrin.

Charles Curran and Richard McCormick, Readings in Moral eology, no. 10 (New York: Paulist, 1998), 109-19; and Charles E. Curran, Evangelium Vitae and Its Broader Context in John Paul II and Moral eology, 120-33. 5 e idea has not only been frequently addressed by his successor but in June of 2010 Benedict XVI announced the creation of a Pontiical Council on the New Evangelization.

Pope John Paul II is the second longest serving pope in history and the longest serving pope of the last century. His presence has thrown a long shadow across our time, and his influence on Catholics and non-Catholics throughout the world cannot be denied. Much has been written about this pope, but until now, no one has provided a systematic and thorough analysis of the moral theology that underlies his moral teachings and its astonishing influence. And no one is better positioned to do this than Charles E. Curran, widely recognized as the leading American Catholic moral theologian.Curran focuses on the authoritative statements, specifically the fourteen papal encyclicals the pope has written over the past twenty-five years, to examine how well the pope has addressed the broad issues and problems in the Church today. Curran begins with a discussion of the theological presuppositions of John Paul II's moral teaching and moral theology. Subsequent chapters address his theological methodology, his ethical methodology, and his fundamental moral theology together with his understanding of human life. Finally, Curran deals with the specific issues of globalization, marriage, conscience, human acts, and the many issues involved in social and sexual ethics. While finding much to admire, Curran is nonetheless fiercely precise in his analysis and rigorously thoughtful in his criticism of much of the methodological aspects of the pope's moral theology―in his use of scripture, tradition, and previous hierarchical teaching; in theological aspects including Christology, eschatology, and the validity of human sources of moral wisdom and knowledge; and in anthropology, the ethical model and natural law. Brilliantly constructed and fearlessly argued, this will be the definitive measure of Pope John Paul II's moral theology for years to come.
Comments:
Malalrajas
Father Curran lost his faculty position to teach moral theology/ethics at the Catholic University of America in 1987, having been warned for nearly twenty years. Now Pope Francis has endorsed Bl. Pope Paul VI"s "Humanae Vitae" it would seem that Father Curran is still not thinking with the Church...

Xar
In this book, moral theologian Charles Curran undertakes a careful and critical study of the moral theology of John Paul II.

John Paul II is probably the first Pope in the history of the 20th century who concerned himself so much with ethical questions. A very large number of John Paul II's writings, lectures, and addresses as Pope deal almost entirely with ethical questions, whether in areas like social justice and economic affairs, or sexual morality and bioethical questions.

Curran quite rightly focuses on JPII's letter 'Veritatis Splendour' as his 'magnum opus' in moral theology, which sets out his vision. Despite a generally Thomist approach, the foundation of JPII's moral theology is what he sees as the divine law and commandments as set out in the scriptures and interpreted only in an authentic manner by the magisterium (official teaching office) of the church.

Curran highlights how JPII believed due to sin, secularism, and a generally decadent Western culture, the only true guidance in moral matters could be found through the guidance of the official teachers and pastors of the church, led of course by his own final and definitive answers to moral questions.

Curran examines the strengths of John Paul II's theology as well as the weaker and more troublesome aspects, particularly in controversial issues of sex, gender, and bioethics. Curran is generally fair to JPII and fortunately is not uncritical or simplistic in his assessment.

Because Curran comes from a revisionist perspective he is unlikely to please traditionalist Catholics who insist on unswerving obedience and defence of the teachings of the magisterium, no matter how contrary to reason or conscience they may seem. This would particularly be the case for a person who believes the only authentic role for the theologian is to accept and defend Papal teachings without question, and the only role of conscience is to decide how to implement church teachings in their own circumstance.

But for those seeking to move beyond the impasse of narrow and rigid conservatism Curran's examination offers helpful insights into John Paul's thinking and positive ways his teaching might be engaged in moral debates without falling into the trap of blind obedience or fundamentalist-style black and white thinking about all moral issues.

Jan
Curran is an outstanding scholar by all accounts and this book continues to show this. I can think of few others better positioned to write a clear-headed, scholarly, and critically astute commentary on the impact of the last Pope.

I am aghast that another reviewer considers Curran to lack the "mental age and spiritual maturity" to write this book. Rome did award him two doctorates after all. Curran is widely respected in the field and has been writing (almost 40 books?) since the 60s. He's met with John Paul II and wrestled theologically with Ratzinger, now Pope Bendict XVI, several times, only to be censured as an example to other canonized theologians who still rightly teach that conscientious catholics can dissent from noninfallible teaching. Most good Catholic moral theology is now coming from Catholic scholars at noncatholic schools, where a climate of fear remains since Curran's dismissal such that theological critique, academic freedom, and creativity is rare. You can read about "the Curran Case" and its impact in many books.

This book is another important contribution to Catholic Moral Theology by one who loves the church but refuses to simply repeat the party line. Another reviewer revealed his ignorance by stating: "Curran has long been the champion of the ax to grind, sexual license obsessed, do what I want then find a justification for it- Christian." Holy cow... anyone who has actually read Curran knows that he is far from "sexual license obsessed." He is no "cafeteria Catholic." That reviewer makes it sound like Curran's some kind of wacko libertarian while his actual sexual views are far more conservative than many conservatives.

Curran merely argues that the heirarchical teaching on many sexual issues is based on a highly disputable and oft criticized (and by many "official" catholic teachers) version of natural law theory that reduces the human person to its biological functions. When looking at the whole person and the relationships in which that person has responsibilties it is ludicrous to maintain that human reason cannot, in some rare case, decide to intervene in a biological function. Further, this universalistic kind of teaching is operative at the general level, and even Aquinas affirmed that as you move to the specific or particular there are always exceptions to the rule. Neoscholastic natural law theory is indeed eccentric in its use of the Sacred Doctor. The authority claimed by recent popes on moral matters is a blip on the 2000 year historical screen in which it was for a long time canonically allowed that consciencious Catholics could dissent from noninfallible papal teachings so long as a good number of canonized theologians of "good repute" held to a contrary position (consult the moral manuals of the early 18th century, for example).

This book does precisely what moral theologians are supposed to do: step back and try to think critically, thematically, and systematically about some set of doctrine or teaching with the intent to explore its moral, theological, and ecclesiological consistency. Curran does just that, and with a love for the Church that cries out for a reasonable understanding of the best of the Catholic tradition, restating that something isn't morally right simply because the Pope said it. The popes are supposed to teach what is right and good because it is right and good. As humans, they can get it wrong, have in the past, and have admitted it. What sense, then, does it make to say, "if a pope says it it must be right"??? What happened to the Church?

ISBN: 0751523593
ISBN13: 978-0751523591
language: English
Subcategory: Catholicism
ISBN: 0750228237
ISBN13: 978-0750228237
language: English
ISBN: 0761825371
ISBN13: 978-0761825371
language: English
Subcategory: Religious Studies
ISBN: 0268018383
ISBN13: 978-0268018382
language: English
ISBN: 1890177296
language: English
Subcategory: Theology
e-Book The Wisdom of John Paul II: The Pope on Life's Most Vital Questions download

The Wisdom of John Paul II: The Pope on Life's Most Vital Questions epub fb2

by Nick Bakalar,Richard Balkin,Kevin McCarthy,John White,Pope John Paul II
ISBN: 0787106496
ISBN13: 978-0787106492
language: English
Subcategory: Catholicism
ISBN: 0824521218
ISBN13: 978-0824521219
language: English
Subcategory: World
e-Book The Encyclicals of John Paul II download

The Encyclicals of John Paul II epub fb2

by J. Michael Miller,Pope John Paul II
ISBN: 0879733160
ISBN13: 978-0879733162
language: English
Subcategory: Churches and Church Leadership
ISBN: 0824500415
ISBN13: 978-0824500412
language: English
Subcategory: Essays and Correspondence
ISBN: 0694522279
ISBN13: 978-0694522279
language: English
Subcategory: Catholicism