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e-Book Yankee Leviathan: The Origins of Central State Authority in America, 1859-1877 download

e-Book Yankee Leviathan: The Origins of Central State Authority in America, 1859-1877 download

by Richard Franklin Bensel

ISBN: 0521398177
ISBN13: 978-0521398176
Language: English
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (January 25, 1991)
Pages: 468
Category: Humanities
Subategory: Other

ePub size: 1716 kb
Fb2 size: 1622 kb
DJVU size: 1942 kb
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 639
Other Formats: doc mobi docx lrf

In Yankee Leviathan, the irresistable conflict of the 1850s is not simply resolved in the North's favor .

In Yankee Leviathan, the irresistable conflict of the 1850s is not simply resolved in the North's favor, it is transposed into the structure and operations of new state formation. Stephen Skowronek, Yale University.

Bensel, Richard Franklin, 1949-. Sectionalism (United States). Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Kahle/Austin Foundation.

Yankee Leviathan book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Contending that intense competition for national political economy. Start by marking Yankee Leviathan: The Origins of Central State Authority in America, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Richard Franklin Bensel (born 1949) is a professor of American politics at. .

Richard Franklin Bensel (born 1949) is a professor of American politics at Cornell University. Bensel has attempted to bridge the gap between American economic and political history, with an eye toward comparative implications. Bensel is best known as a scholar of political economy. Yankee Leviathan: The Origins of Central State Authority in America, 1859–1877 (1991). The American Ballot Box in the Mid-Nineteenth Century (2004). Passions and Preferences: William Jennings Bryan and the 1896 Democratic National Convention (2008).

This book describes the impact of the American Civil War on the development of central state authority in the late nineteenth . Powerful study of the birth of "Big Government" in America. com User, January 20, 2000.

This book describes the impact of the American Civil War on the development of central state authority in the late nineteenth century.

oceedings{Gerteis1990YankeeL, title {Yankee leviathan : the origins of central state . Louis S. Gerteis, Richard Franklin Bensel.

oceedings{Gerteis1990YankeeL, title {Yankee leviathan : the origins of central state authority in America, 1859-1877}, author {Louis S. Gerteis and Richard Franklin Bensel}, year {1990} }.

PDF On May 1, 2009, Clyde W. Barrow and others published Yankee Leviathan: The Origins of Central State . Barrow and others published Yankee Leviathan: The Origins of Central State Authority in America, 1859–1877. By Richard Franklin Bensel. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1990. After the war ended, however, tension within the Republican coalition led to the abandonment of Reconstruction and to the return of former Confederates to political power throughout the South. As a result, American state expansion ground to a halt during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

This book describes the impact of the American Civil War on the development of central state authority in the late . ENG. Number of Pages. Richard Franklin Bensel. Contending that intense competition for national political economy control produced secession, this study describes the impact of the American Civil War upon the late nineteenth century development of central state authority. Cambridge University Press.

This book describes the impact of the American Civil War on the development of central state authority in the late nineteenth century. The author contends that intense competition for control of the national political economy between the free North and slave South produced secession, which in turn spawned the formation of two new states, a market-oriented northern Union and a southern Confederacy in which government controls on the economy were much more important. During the Civil War, the American state both expanded and became the agent of northern economic development. After the war ended, however, tension within the Republican coalition led to the abandonment of Reconstruction and to the return of former Confederates to political power throughout the South. As a result, American state expansion ground to a halt during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This book makes a major contribution to the understanding of the causes and consequences of the Civil War and the legacy of the war in the twentieth century.
Comments:
Moogugore
On time, as described.

Felhalar
Bensel is perhaps the best in the area of American Political Development. His work his thorough, accurate, and - unlike so many others - enjoyable. He gives a very clear explanation of how the Federal Government gained strength during and immediately after the Civil War.

Jark
Loved the book. Important to my thinking about the growth of the state concerning natural resources in the 1870s and later. Also led me to think about where doctors who acquired expertise during the Civil War ended up upon their return to civilian life. But mostly, I was astonished at the creativity the 2 national governments exhibited when violating the sanctity of private property rights in order to organize production and distribution for the immediate needs of the military. Thanks to the author for grinding through the data, staying on point, and creating a really sound and helpful reinterpretation of state power.

Altad
OK, maybe I'm not being fair with a rating of 3. I admit you can debate that issue. As an academic work, it's worth 5 stars for those of you who are Civil War scholars. Bensel's charts, for example, are superb and unique. He is clearly a quality historian, and I intend to cite him on a number of points he made in Yankee Leviathan. So what's my problem?

As a writer he is a pure academician, which to me is synonymous with boredom. Typically, the reader often has to dig for Bensel's points. His sentences are long-winded and lead one's mind to stray, but the points are there and worth seeking if you are a scholar. Frustratingly, he will suddenly come alive and lay out his arguments in a concise, interesting format. Why could he have not done that throughout? His writing cost him one star in my eyes, and he lost a second when he failed to include a bibliography. Thank you, Dr. Bensel, but I do not wish to spend fifteen minutes paging back through your voluminous footnotes until I finally find the complete title for "Jones, Slavery in Mississippi."

This is obviously a textbook. You can tell because Bensel begins each chapter by telling us in length what he's going to discuss and then discusses it. A waste of paper. Just get to it. At the least, just tick off your major points in a half page. You can also tell it's a textbook by the exorbitant one-hundred-dollar price tag for the hard cover version. Buy it in paperback. Better yet, buy it used in paperback. A third giveaway is the huge number of footnotes and their ponderous length. The narrative may end on page 436, but the book reads significantly longer because the tiny-fonted footnotes often contain a large amount of relevant side information not covered in the narrative.

If you are a serious scholar of the Civil War, buy it. The information it contains is excellent. If only the presentation were better.

Fani
Author Richard Bensel's goal is to describe the "origins" of "central state authority" in the U.S. But his approach to this task tends toward the bizarre, as he allows theory to overwhelm evidence and common sense. Such value as this book has lies in its descriptions of what the U.S. and Confederate governments actually did during the war, and during Reconstruction. But the wrongheaded conceptual framework leads to skimpy descriptions of events, and attempted explanations that are just wrong.

Bensel is trying to fit the U.S. into a general theory of the formation of strong central governments. The theory in question, he admits, was created by historians studying European states. As Bensel says early on, the events that typically happened with those governments happened in a different order than they did in the U.S. For example, one of the main stages of the theory concerns the creation of a civil service that is insulated from political pressures. This didn't happen at all in the U.S. till 1883, with the passage of the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act. Since the book covers the years 1861 through 1877, this supposedly important stage occurs after his study period.

Another stage that the "general theory" deals with is the extension of the vote to all adult males. In the U.S., universal white manhood suffrage was the law in twenty eight out of thirty three states by 1860. So that important stage was essentially complete before the beginning of the period studied. A sensible historian would have realized that the "general" was not general, and discarded or modified it. Instead, Bensel plunged on.

Perhaps the weirdest and funniest example of his 'general' theory distorting understanding are his references to the "Republican party-state." This is his term for political patronage, written into the Constitution in 1787, and vigorously practiced since at least Andrew Jackson's inauguration in 1829. When Democrats controlled the White House, federal civilian employees were Democrats, when Whigs controlled it, they were Whigs. Other examples of the extension of state power concern the protective tariff, an issue since the ratification of the Constitution, and a reality in the years 1815-1831, and conscription, which dates to the colonial period. There's also the chartering of national banks, another old and intermittent policy (the First Bank of the United States was chartered in 1791).

Once you brush away the not-at-all-general theory, the events described here are rather unsurprising. The U.S. and Confederate governments were fighting a huge, intense war, and had to mobilize unprecedented resources or give up the fight. But once the war was over, the Confederate measures ceased entirely, because there was no Confederacy. And most of the Union government's measures, such as conscription, also lapsed. The big government measures that did survive had to do with the Reconstruction, and almost all ended in 1877 with the demise of Reconstruction. The few "central state" policies that survived were mostly old, long debated, and intermittently employed. The truly new policies were relatively minor, such as the homestead act and the land-grant colleges.

In a telling passage, Bensel admits that the U.S. federal government didn't have a peacetime reach equal to the that of the Civil War era until Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal. In other words, the real origins of "Central State Authority" lie in the Progressive through New Deal Era. Perhaps someone will write the book telling how that real and permanent change came about. But this isn't it.

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