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e-Book Subcortical Structures and Cognition: Implications for Neuropsychological Assessment download

e-Book Subcortical Structures and Cognition: Implications for Neuropsychological Assessment download

by Deborah Ely Budding,Leonard F. Koziol

ISBN: 0387848665
ISBN13: 978-0387848662
Language: English
Publisher: Springer; 2009 edition (December 2, 2008)
Pages: 405
Category: Medicine and Health Sciences
Subategory: Other

ePub size: 1890 kb
Fb2 size: 1265 kb
DJVU size: 1854 kb
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 147
Other Formats: mobi docx mobi lit

Deborah Ely Budding, Private Practice, Manhattan Beach, California

Deborah Ely Budding, Private Practice, Manhattan Beach, California. Subcortical Structures and Cognition breaks with this traditional view, arguing for a practice-oriented rethinking of brain organization.

Implications for Neuropsychological Assessment. The first book to discuss the cognitive and emotional aspects of subcortical pathology at the level of clinical neuropsychology. Show all. About the authors.

In this book, the authors explain the functional neuroanatomy of circuitries and highlight the key contributions of basal ganglia and cerebellar structures on motor behavior, cognition, and affect. The book is divided into 12 chapters

In this book, the authors explain the functional neuroanatomy of circuitries and highlight the key contributions of basal ganglia and cerebellar structures on motor behavior, cognition, and affect. The book is divided into 12 chapters. Each chapter is discussed in a logical way and comes with a list of well-selected references. The chapters are easy to read, bringing contemporary knowledge to the reader.

Subcortical Structures and Cognition: Implications for Neuropsychological Assessment. Leonard F. Koziol, Deborah Ely Budding. Скачать (pdf, . 4 Mb).

Leonard F. Koziol Deborah Ely Budding21 sánzá ya mínei 2009. The second half of the book examines neuropsychological assessment. Dr. Koziol is a clinical psychologist with specialty board certifications in Neuropsychology and Pediatric Neuropsychology. Springer Science & Business Media. Patients with lesions restricted to the cerebellum and/or basal ganglia have been described as exhibiting a variety of cognitive deficits on neuropsychological tests. He works with children, adolescents, and adults with attention or concentration problems, memory loss, or learning disabilities.

The Cerebellum in Neuropsychological Testing. The Integrated Brain: Implications for Neuropsychological Evaluation. oceedings{alSA, title {Subcortical Structures and Cognition: Implications for Neuropsychological Assessment}, author {Deborah Ely Budding and Leonard F. Koziol}, year {2008} }. Deborah Ely Budding, Leonard F. Koziol. Introduction: Movement, Cognition, and the Vertically Organized Brain. The Basal Ganglia: Beyond the Motor System-From Movement to Thought. Frontal-Subcortical Real Estate: Location, Location, Location.

Subcortical Structures and Cognition book.

Clinical psychologists and neuropsychologists have been taught for years that cognitive processes are mainly mediated by the cortex (the cortico-centric. LF Koziol and DE Budding, Subcortical Structures and Cognition: Implications for Neuropsychological Assessment. Published: 10 September 2009. by Springer Science and Business Media LLC. Category: Психология.

Clinical psychologists and neuropsychologists are traditionally taught that cognition is mediated by the cortex and that subcortical brain regions mediate the coordination of movement. However, this argument can easily be challenged based upon the anatomic organization of the brain. The relationship between the prefrontal cortex/frontal lobes and basal ganglia is characterized by loops from these anterior brain regions to the striatum, the globus pallidus, and the thalamus, and then back to the frontal cortex. There is also a cerebrocerebellar system defined by projections from the cerebral cortex to the pontine nuclei, to the cerebellar cortex and deep cerebellar nuclei, to the red nucleus and then back to thalamus and cerebral cortex, including all regions of the frontal lobes. Therefore, both the cortical-striatal and cortical-cerebellar projections are anatomically defined as re-entrant systems that are obviously in a position to influence not only motor behavior, but also cognition and affect. This represents overwhelming evidence based upon neuroanatomy alone that subcortical regions play a role in cognition. The first half of this book defines the functional neuroanatomy of cortical-subcortical circuitries and establishes that since structure is related to function, what the basal ganglia and cerebellum do for movement they also do for cognition and emotion.

The second half of the book examines neuropsychological assessment. Patients with lesions restricted to the cerebellum and/or basal ganglia have been described as exhibiting a variety of cognitive deficits on neuropsychological tests. Numerous investigations have demonstrated that higher-level cognitive functions such as attention, executive functioning, language, visuospatial processing, and learning and memory are affected by subcortical pathologies. There is also considerable evidence that the basal ganglia and cerebellum play a critical role in the regulation of affect and emotion. These brain regions are an integral part of the brain’s executive system. The ability to apply new methodologies clinically is essential in the evaluation of disorders with subcortical pathology, including various developmental disorders (broadly defined to include learning disorders and certain psychiatric conditions), for the purpose of gaining greater understanding of these conditions and developing appropriate methodologies for treatment.

The book is organized around three sources of evidence:

neuroanatomical connections;

patients with various disease processes;

experimental studies, including various imaging techniques.

These three sources of data present compelling evidence that the basal ganglia and cerebellum are involved in cognition, affect, and emotion. The question is no longer if these subcortical regions are involved in these processes, but instead, how they are involved. The book is also organized around two basic concepts: (1) the functional neuroanatomy of the basal ganglia and the cerebellum; and (2) how this relates to behavior and neuropsychological testing.

Cognitive neuroscience is entering a new era as we recognize the roles of subcortical structures in the modulation of cognition. The fields of neuropsychology, cognitive psychology, neuropsychiatry, and neurology are all developing in the direction of understanding the roles of subcortical structures in behavior. This book is informative while defining the need and direction for new paradigms and methodologies for neuropsychological assessment.

Comments:
Nekora
This is a very important book, and one that I have been waiting for; from the point of giving the cerebellum and other brain regions due regard, and dispensing with the false dichotomy between cognitive functions and motor skills, in the sense that brain regions were considered to be specific to intellectual skills vs motor function. For a very long time, the cerebellum was specifically associated with fine motor skills, only.
As a layman, I found this text for skilled practitioners to be very well written, thorough, comprehensive and readable. An in depth knowledge of brain function is surely required, but the vertical orientation of brain function Dr. Koziol promotes in this and other if his publications are of utmost importance and hopefully will not need several generations of time to impact our understanding of not just brain hierarchy and function but also the implications for how we value abilities, which is my interest.
The second half of the book discusses particular implications for such issues as autism and schizophrenia, and case studies, for practitioners. Much to digest, overall the most important book I own next to one on Russian neurophysiologist Nicolai Bernstein.

MarF
How right they are! Adds a new and wiser perspective about how the brain works beyond the isolated cortex, which of course is not really isolated at all except by convention.

Kifer
Leonard F. Koziol might be the number one scientist to understand the complex network organization and function of the whole brain. If you really want to learn something more than mainstream and popular fMRI findings about small part of the brain or isolated functions, read this book!

Tygralbine
I can only echo the high praise of this book by the previous 10 reviewers (all five stars), while offering perhaps a slightly different perspective on the volume's contribution and context.

What is most interesting for me is to get the sense from other reviewers on this website that the emphasis on critical roles played by the basal ganglia and cerebellar systems in cognition is news. It may be news to neuropsychologists trained in a corticocentric model of brain function, but frankly, it's not news to anybody else in neuroscience. Indeed, much of the fundamental work on which this fine review was based took place in the 80s and 90s. If anything, this suggests that the theoretical neuroscience foundations in clinical neuropsychology are badly out of date.

I realized roughly 20 years ago that virtually all of my early training in neuropsychology about the brainstem and subcortical areas was so incomplete as to be virtually wrong. We were told that the brainstem was a "dumb arousal center" and that virtually all of the important aspects of consciousness were contributed by the cortex. The real story of an enormous hierarchy of vertically integrated systems, as I found out, is much more interesting than our traditional oversimplification and dismissal of the subcortical brain. The brainstem and particularly the mesodiencephalon may be the original anatomical foundation for integrative mechanisms underpinning a conscious state and allowing the cortex to make its critical contributions, but without which the cortex is completely nonfunctional. The best evidence for this of course comes from the tragic cases of persistent vegetative state associated with severe upper brainstem/mesodiencephalic injuries. The cortex is completely intact anatomically, but the person (including any version of cognitive processing) is completely gone.

One probably could offer an even more radical message than the central concept in the book (that the cerebellum and basal ganglia are critically involved in all cognition). It isn't simply that the cerebellum and basal ganglia are critical to cognition - this of course is absolutely true as the authors beautifully outline. One might offer the even more radical conclusion that cognition itself rests on the foundations of homeostasis and emotion, with consciousness erected on ancient mechanisms predating the cortical forebrain. Cortico-cognitive processing comes along rather late in the evolutionary story, as an adaptive addition to integrative mechanisms that predated the cortical forebrain by many millions of years.

As a test of the hypothesis that cognition is grounded to and energized by fundamental emotional and homeostatic mechanisms, try to just conceptualize a cognitive activity that is not motivated by fundamental emotional or homeostatic needs. This thought experiment quickly underlines that the predominant image of a cognitive/cortical brain as an "information processing" engine, untethered to the body and the body's needs (and particularly the need for social connection) is illusory. This book applies a long overdue corrective to a discipline that in some sense has been blinded by the simplistic corticocentric view of brain function. I recommend it highly.

Weiehan
Drs. Koziol and Budding have done a masterful job of analyzing and synthesizing the literature on subcortical contributions to cognition in this highly readable and practical text. If you are looking for an up to date review of how subcortical structures influence cognition, then this is the book for you. Drawing on the latest research about the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and cortical-subcortical pathways, Koziol and Budding present a well thought out and integrated model of cognition that goes beyond the traditional cortico-centric model. I especially liked the authors' presentation of clinical case examples, drawn from the real world, which illustrate the points they are trying to convey. This book should prove clinically useful to seasoned clinicians, as well as advanced graduate students in neuropsychology. It is a welcome contribution to the growing literature in this area.

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