pbstudio
e-Book Tigers of the Snow and Other Virtual Sherpas download

e-Book Tigers of the Snow and Other Virtual Sherpas download

by Vincanne Adams

ISBN: 0691034419
ISBN13: 978-0691034416
Language: English
Publisher: Princeton University Press; 1st Edition edition (December 11, 1995)
Pages: 320
Category: Social Sciences
Subategory: Other

ePub size: 1579 kb
Fb2 size: 1857 kb
DJVU size: 1451 kb
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 636
Other Formats: txt doc lit docx

Virtual Sherpas are produced through mimesis; and this statement already indicates the definition of the term.

Virtual Sherpas are produced through mimesis; and this statement already indicates the definition of the term. Following Paul Ricoeur, Adams argues that mimesis, normally defined as the imitation of nature in art, is not to be seen as copy, but creation and construction (18). 17) And this is what Tigers of the Snow is about: how the images by which Sherpas have been portrayed (discussed in chapter one) are internalized by them through specific apparatuses for producing Sherpa "authenticity". The apparatuses discussed here are biomedicine (chapter 2), Buddhism (chp. 3), shamanism (chp.

Sherpas are portrayed by Westerners as heroic mountain guides, or "tigers of the snow, " as Buddhist adepts .

In this book, Vincanne Adams explores how attempts to characterize an "authentic" Sherpa are complicated .

In this book, Vincanne Adams explores how attempts to characterize an "authentic" Sherpa are complicated by Western fascination with Sherpas and by the Sherpas' desires to live up to Western portrayals of them. In this book, Vincanne Adams explores how attempts to characterize an "authentic" Sherpa are complicated by Western fascination with Sherpas and by the Sherpas' desires to live up to Western portrayals of them.

Tigers of the Snow and Other Virtual Sherpas: An Ethnography of Himalayan. Vincanne Adams - Google Books. Retrieved 2013-10-17.

BOOK: Tigers of the Snow and Other Virtual Sherpas . Vincanne Adams, Sienna Craig and Mona Schrempf. BOOK: Medicine Between Science and Religion: Explorations on Tibetan Ground London: Berghahn Publishers 2010 BOOK: Markets of Sorrow, Labors o. .

BOOK: Tigers of the Snow and Other Virtual Sherpas: An Ethnography of Himalayan Encounters Princeton University Press, 1996 BOOK: Doctors for Democracy: Health Professionals in the Nepal Revolution Cambridge University Press (Series in Medical Anthropology), 1998  . BOOK: Medicine Between Science and Religion: Explorations on Tibetan Ground London: Berghahn Publishers 2010 BOOK: Markets of Sorrow, Labors of Faith: New Orleans in the Wake of Katrina Duke University Press 2013.

In Nepal, the Sherpa community has been an important and economically successful part of globalizing Himalayan climbing for over 50 years (Adams, 1996; Brower, 1991; Gurung, 1998; Ortner, 1997, 1999).

In Nepal, the Sherpa community has been an important and economically successful part of globalizing Himalayan climbing for over 50 years (Adams, 1996; Brower, 1991; Gurung, 1998; Ortner, 1997, 1999) human relations.

Please accept our apologies for any inconvenience caused.

In this book, Vincanne Adams explore. Princeton University Press.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Vincanne Adams books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Tigers of the Snow and Other Virtual Sherpas.

Tigers of the snow and other virtual Sherpas: an ethnography of Himalayan encounters more. Publication Date: Jan 1, 1996. by Vincanne Adams more.

Sherpas are portrayed by Westerners as heroic mountain guides, or "tigers of the snow," as Buddhist adepts, and as a people in touch with intimate ways of life that seem no longer available in the Western world. In this book, Vincanne Adams explores how attempts to characterize an "authentic" Sherpa are complicated by Western fascination with Sherpas and by the Sherpas' desires to live up to Western portrayals of them. Noting that diplomatic aides at world summit meetings go by the name "Sherpa," as do a van in the U.K. built for rough terrain and a software product from Silicon Valley, Adams examines the "authenticating" effects of this mobile signifier on a community of Himalayan Sherpas who live at the base of Mount Everest, Nepal, and its "deauthenticating" effects on anthropological representation.

This book speaks not only to anthropologists concerned with ethnographic portrayals of Otherness but also to those working in cultural studies who are concerned with ethnographically grounded analyses of representations. Throughout Adams illustrates how one might undertake an ethnography of transnationally produced subjects by using the notion of "virtual" identities. In a manner informed by both Buddhism and shamanism, virtual Sherpas are always both real and distilled reflections of the desires that produce them.

Comments:
Mettiarrb
"What is authenticity except anthropology in its most profitable guise?" (229)

In Tigers of the Snow and Other Virtual Sherpas, Vincanne Adams (1996) provocatively takes on not only long-cherished images of Sherpas, but also an underlying paradigm of much of the anthropological enterprise. That she hits a nerve is perhaps indicated by the two other readers' reviews, which would in fact deserve to be cited in a new edition (and not just for their entertainment value): rather than dismiss them for obviously not getting the point, the American reader's demand to "stop scrutinizing those lovely folk", and the Sherpa's for both a more favorable and a more "substantial" (i.e. essentialist) portrayal of his people, can both be read more profitably as a defense of each group's interests in face of what to them seems like an attack on the Sherpas, but what is in fact one on misconceived notions of authenticity and reality.

Still, the concerns voiced here hint at a problem this book is self-consciously trying to overcome: how can analytical rigor be reconciled with the interests of the people one studies? How, in other words, can we avoid disempowering those we speak of, and at the same time avoid simply reproducing the very discourse that we are trying to study - even if, as in this case, it seems to be working to the satisfaction of both sides involved? The solution offered here is especially interesting as it uses the parallels between postmodern theory (esp. Baudrillard, Taussig, Ricoeur) and Buddhist philosophy to displace the perspective from a Western to a Sherpa standpoint, however scripturalized and elitist it may be. Mimesis thus happens here not only in the analysis, but also to the analysis. Before going further into the mimetic uses of Buddhist philosophy in anthropological discourse, however, a brief look at the key terms and arguments in this book is in order.

What are "virtual Sherpas"? Adams starts with an old meaning of virtual - "possessed of certain physical qualities" (20) - and points out that this certainly fits the case of the Sherpas. Since their first encounters with Western mountaineering expeditions, they have been ascribed admirable physical qualities such as endurance and climbing skills, which continue to define Sherpa identity even today. However, the argument does not stop at Middle English: since, as she points out, virtual Sherpas have no original to mimic, they actually emerge as the product of a meeting of Western desires to find a better self in an Other, and Sherpa desires to be better Sherpas by fulfilling the Westerners' desires. Thus, in contrast to Homi Bhabha's "almost-but-not-quite reality" of colonial mimesis, a hyper-reality is created - that is, Sherpas who are more real than the actual reality.

Virtual Sherpas are produced through mimesis; and this statement already indicates the definition of the term. Following Paul Ricoeur, Adams argues that mimesis, normally defined as the imitation of nature in art, is not to be seen as copy, but creation and construction (18). In the particular context of the Sherpas, mimesis is "a process of identity construction - the imitation of what is taken to be one's "natural" self by way of the Other, through whom one's constructed identity is made visible to oneself." (17) And this is what Tigers of the Snow is about: how the images by which Sherpas have been portrayed (discussed in chapter one) are internalized by them through specific apparatuses for producing Sherpa "authenticity". The apparatuses discussed here are biomedicine (chapter 2), Buddhism (chp. 3), shamanism (chp. 4), and an economy in which social relations and culture are worth more than money (chp. 5). After all, virtual Sherpas are produced not only along the lines of physical feats of strength and endurance: they are also ascribed the desirable character traits that Westerners perceive themselves to be lacking. In a way, then, Sherpas are the "better Westerners", but at the same time they need to remain different and exotic enough to function as acceptable denizens of Shangri-la, as the unwitting spiritual role models for those Westerners wishing to undergo mimesis themselves. To make up for this reciprocal inequity, furthermore, the Sherpas must also be seen as in need, and worthy, of aid which the West can provide, like schools, hospitals, and, more fundamentally, money. Here we see that the seemingly unidirectional mimesis of the Sherpas adapting to Western imaginations works in both directions: Westerners engage in mimesis as much as the Sherpas, not only in their quest to emulate their imagined spiritual qualities but also when they feel compelled to live up to the social expectations of their Sherpa friends.

What emerges here is reminiscent of a virtual mirror cabinet, where images are reflected and refracted endlessly, and any question of authenticity becomes moot. However, the move beyond authenticity is also one beyond its opposite: just because Sherpa identity is revealed to be the product of a mimesis between the desires of Sherpas and Western tourists, development workers, and anthropologists, does not mean that it is all just fake - a clever performance in the interest of business. In the contrary, Adams argues that there is no "backstage", no place where the Sherpas live their "real" lives, no locus of such an authenticity. The fact that Sherpas obviously engage in image management does not mean that this image is inauthentic. Nor does the fact that in anthropological analysis both authenticity and culture have ceased to be useful analytic tools mean that the same terms aren't at the same time highly important discursive symbols for Sherpas and others. As especially chapter 5 argues, Sherpa authenticity and culture are eminently marketable products, and also strategic "gifts" (in the form of granting Westerners access to what they consider the "backstage" of Sherpa life) in order to "seduce" them into mutually beneficial relationships.

Considering that Sherpa identity in this mirror cabinet emerges as essenceless, ephemeral, and unfixed (see the two irritated critics below), Mahayana Buddhist doctrine about emptiness and impermanence becomes a useful conceptual framework. Considering, furthermore, the Buddha's statement - when asked how suffering and ignorance began - that he did not see any beginning or origin, this is all the more useful to counter the somewhat nagging question about the "original" subject in this mimesis, the one that was blown up from normal reality into hyper-reality. Most importantly, apart from being a successful - despite many dangers and complexities - experiment in using a non-Western conceptual framework in a serious way, this analytic move achieves two ends: it calls attention, once again, to the fact that the lack of essence and permanence doesn't undermine "authenticity" (it does so only when authenticity is wrongly defined as permanent and essential, and this is the important critique this book makes), and in doing so, it addresses the concerns of the Sherpas, who rely on their intact "culture" and "authenticity" for their (economic) survival. The term "virtual Sherpa", to return to the book's title, sums up the argument perfectly.

Delalbine
Having recently visited Nepal, where I bought a copy of this spectacularly arrogant book (Thamel namaste), I have felt moved to write this review. In the fullness of time, I have no doubt that history will not kindly judge authors of Adams' genre. Ethnography, race and culturality are fraught subjects and just as the prevalent works of the late 19th century describe Africans as "unreliable and savage beasts undeserving of their upright posture..... prone to unreasonable rages.....etc etc etc ", so Adams' curious conclusions will outrage. Stop scrutinising those lovely folk please! They're as human as you and me. And no more books on other folks - this is the new millennium.

e-Book Tigers (World of Mammals) download

Tigers (World of Mammals) epub fb2

by Tami Collins,Adele Richardson
ISBN: 0736854177
ISBN13: 978-0736854177
language: English
Subcategory: Animals
ISBN: 1428640142
ISBN13: 978-1428640146
language: English
Subcategory: Literary
ISBN: 0316854905
ISBN13: 978-0316854900
language: English
Subcategory: Asia
ISBN: 045123331X
ISBN13: 978-0451233318
language: English
Subcategory: World
ISBN: 0241142660
ISBN13: 978-0241142660
language: English
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
ISBN: 0708956645
ISBN13: 978-0708956649
language: English
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
ISBN: 0520241096
ISBN13: 978-0520241336
language: English
Subcategory: World
ISBN: 1443805521
ISBN13: 978-1443805520
language: English
Subcategory: Politics and Government
ISBN: 0431001146
ISBN13: 978-0431001142
language: English
Subcategory: Animals
ISBN: 077107462X
ISBN13: 978-0771074622
language: English
Subcategory: Contemporary