pbstudio
e-Book Patriarchal Attitudes: Women in Society download

e-Book Patriarchal Attitudes: Women in Society download

by Eva Figes

ISBN: 0892551224
ISBN13: 978-0892551224
Language: English
Publisher: Persea Books; Reprint edition (April 1, 1987)
Pages: 191
Category: Social Sciences
Subategory: Other

ePub size: 1271 kb
Fb2 size: 1516 kb
DJVU size: 1110 kb
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 166
Other Formats: lrf doc azw rtf

For women, as Eva Figes shows in "Patriarchal Attitudes," provoke censoriousness no end. Mrs. Figes has gathered a notable sheaf of quotations from the great didactics, beginning with Rousseau and coming to a climax.

For women, as Eva Figes shows in "Patriarchal Attitudes," provoke censoriousness no end. Figes has gathered a notable sheaf of quotations from the great didactics, beginning with Rousseau and coming to a climax with Freud, all looking at the opposite sex as if they had seen a ghost, turning white as a sheet, crying out that this is against nature, and working out rites of exorcism by restrictive conventions

Women in the Ministry of Jesus: A Study of Jesus' Attitudes to Women and their Roles as Reflected in His Earthly Life (Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series). Get Top Trending Free Books in Your Inbox. What's the problem with this file?

Women in the Ministry of Jesus: A Study of Jesus' Attitudes to Women and their Roles as Reflected in His Earthly Life (Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series). 61 MB·439 Downloads·New! to the current debate on women's roles in the Church and society. Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI. 374 Pages·2017·4. 31 MB·44,523 Downloads. What's the problem with this file?

Patriarchal Attitudes book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Patriarchal Attitudes: Women In Society as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Patriarchal Attitudes book.

Male chauvinism through the ages, ably analyzed and interpreted by novelist Eva Figes, who like many an author seeking to describe women in society has ended up writing a book largely about men. Figes wishes to demonstrate that nurture rather than nature has shaped all the secondary sex characteristics we define as masculine and feminine, and since women themselves have had so little say in defining the norms they are spoonfed, the discussion here centers around the attitudes of influential male thinkers from the men behind the Bible to Super Patriarch Sigmund Freud.

Publisher: Persea Books. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Submit a book or article. Upload a bibliography. Personal pages we track. Similar books and articles. Added to PP index 2015-02-13. Information for publishers. Total views 25 ( of 2,269,369 ). Recent downloads (6 months) 1 ( of 2,269,369 ). How can I increase my downloads? Downloads.

ISBN13:9780860680222. Release Date:January 1978.

Figes's best known work is Patriarchal Attitudes, a feminist polemic written in. .Patriarchal Attitudes: Women in Society (1970).

Figes's best known work is Patriarchal Attitudes, a feminist polemic written in 1970, published one month before Germaine Greer's The Female Eunuch Figes' novel, Light (1983), is an impressionistic portrait of a single day in the life of Claude Monet from sunrise to sunset. Figes won the Guardian Fiction Prize for Winter Journey in 1967. Tragedy and Social Evolution (1976).

Book by Figes, Eva
Comments:
Tinavio
Thank you. Everything about this purchase was awesome. It was a great book and arrived in excellent condition. Package actually arrived early at no extra charge. Was very impressed with the condition of the book. Not one imperfection with the condition of this book. Will be a return customer.

Akinonris
The book is excellent, it arrive quickly in like new asppearance. I like the idea of recycling the used books

Tojahn
Aren't Men Beasts
By Rebecca West
(A review of "Patriarchal Attitudes: Women in Society", by Eva Figes, Faber, 1970.)

There is, of course, no reason for the existence of the male sex except that one sometimes needs help in moving the piano. How wrong males are, how unfit they are for any part in this universe (and possibly in any parallel universe either) was shown this summer in the South African cricket tour fuss.

Cricket is only a game. One set of males throw a ball about, others take turns in hitting it with a piece of wood, the males change roles, they slowly walk about. It cannot possibly matter, in any real sense, whether that ball is or is not hit by that piece of wood. Why insist on this non-event taking place if there was a possibility that it would cause any sort of trouble?

And why should it have caused any trouble? Only because there were more males about, pretending that if they stopped the game it would be a protest against the South African policy of apartheid. But from first to last no attempt was made to prove that any of the South African team supported apartheid, so harassment of them may have been as idiotic as beating a Tory M.P. for a misdeed committed by the Labour Government.

The incident was so gross a demonstration of male defect that the obvious thing, with the General Election looming up soon after, was to start an agitation to deprive men of the Parliamentary vote. But men do not excite censoriousness; and that is one of the most important differences between the sexes.

For women, as Eva Figes shows in "Patriarchal Attitudes," provoke censoriousness no end. Mrs. Figes has gathered a notable sheaf of quotations from the great didactics, beginning with Rousseau and coming to a climax with Freud, all looking at the opposite sex as if they had seen a ghost, turning white as a sheet, crying out that this is against nature, and working out rites of exorcism by restrictive conventions.

Even Darwin, whom one had thought of as a calm scientist, shakes like a leaf and makes the most astonishing allegations. According to him, the feminine virtues, though winning, are those found among "the lower races," and were survivals of past and inferior civilizations embedded in the species. My love is like a red, red rose and is also a fossilised Neanderthal.

Darwin ventured on an apothegm, not daring in itself, which it was nevertheless daring of a masculinist to attempt. "No one will dispute that the bull differs in disposition from the cow." The male had better be quiet about that.

The bull discharges a necessary function, but makes an unnecessary fuss about it. He spend his life enjoying agreeable relationships with the female of his species (brief, it is true, but he has no basis for comparison), with all found, and is asked for nothing more. Why does he bellow, paw the ground, chase harmless ramblers into hedges and seek to toss them on his horns in a frenzy of biologically useless rage?

If women were as censorious about men as men are about women, they would have something to say about the bull, whose case arouses various questions, such as why Napoleon did not stop fighting when he had consolidated the French Republic, and what about that extra male chromosome which makes the criminal.

But really, what a pack these masculinists are. Mrs. Figes exhumes for our benefit W.E.H. Lecky, the 19th-century historian who was of the opinion that the prostitute was "ultimately the most efficient guardian of virtue. But for her the unchallenged purity of countless happy homes would be polluted." And she has unearthed an even more painful quotation from this old humbug:

"There are always multitudes who in the period of their lives when their passions are most strong, are incapable of supporting children in their own social rank, and who would therefore injure society by marrying into it, but are nevertheless perfectly capable of securing an honourable career for their illegitimate children in the lower social sphere to which these would naturally belong."

Molière could have used this sentence as it stands in "Tartuffe," and sickening it is in its evocations of carefully kept account books and seduced housemaids.

But stuff as sickening has been written far nearer to our own time by others, including Sigmund Freud. It is curious that psychoanalysis, which has had such an immense influence on the 20th century, has injected Anglo-Saxon culture with the mores of 19th-century Jewish Vienna.

Freud, who would be 114 were he alive today, grew up in a stable economy which enabled Jewish households to support all their women-kind in comfortable homes with no other duty except to pamper their husbands and be pampered in the cosy traditions of their people.

When he went into psychiatric practice in the last decades of the 19th century he found that many of his women patients had developed other ideas and wished to use their brains and perhaps earn their own livings. This shocked him deeply, and he tried to rectify the situation by analysis, a theory which many patients encountered with amazement and which, here restated by Mrs. Figes, still seems amazing.

Freud preached that all little girls felt deprived and envious because they had not the same sexual organs as the male. When it was objected that many little girls knew nothing about the male sexual organs, he claimed that there was a bush telegraph in the unconscious which carried the news to the little girls.

Once Freud and his disciples got a female on the analytic couch and found traces of intellectual activity, they attempted to persuade her that she had prolonged the alleged little girl's alleged dream into adult life and was seeking in work a substitute for the male sexual organ.

When the female patients refused to accept all this nonsense, Freud and his disciples tied up the argument nicely on their side by calling the refusal psychical rigidity.

The question arises whether the human race has ever been as silly as it has become in our time. It adds a wild charm to the scene that of course the female patients were paying large fees for this depressant rough-housing.

"Patriarchal Attitudes" is perhaps more valuable as an anthology of masculinist excess than for Mrs. Figes's own theories, which would appear to better advantage if they were developed in a separate volume. As it is she seems to show undue pessimism about the possibility of men and women living in the same world. A bull may be noisy and dangerous, but it is not impossible to keep one.

Among the incidental material there is recorded the interesting fact that Mrs. Beatrice Webb declared at a public luncheon that she had never met a man, however inferior, "whom I do not consider to be my superior." She was, of course, speaking the truth. She was inferior to any man she met, and any woman too, because, brilliant, clever and fortunate, she was capable of making that statement without believing it, in order to increase her attraction and influence.

It is also interesting to note that Rousseau apparently did not know who Ninon de l'Enclos1 was. He wrote of a bluestocking: "From the lofty heights of her genius, she scorns every womanly duty and she is always trying to make a man of herself after the fashion of Madamoiselle de l'Enclos."

This is not what Ninon was doing, when last heard of.

1 Ninon de l'Enclos was a 17th century author, courtesan and patron of the arts, commemorated in Dorothy Parker's poem: "Ninon De Lenclos, On Her Last Birthday"

Adoraris
Aren't Men Beasts
By Rebecca West
(A review of "Patriarchal Attitudes: Women in Society", by Eva Figes, Faber, 1970.)

There is, of course, no reason for the existence of the male sex except that one sometimes needs help in moving the piano. How wrong males are, how unfit they are for any part in this universe (and possibly in any parallel universe either) was shown this summer in the South African cricket tour fuss.

Cricket is only a game. One set of males throw a ball about, others take turns in hitting it with a piece of wood, the males change roles, they slowly walk about. It cannot possibly matter, in any real sense, whether that ball is or is not hit by that piece of wood. Why insist on this non-event taking place if there was a possibility that it would cause any sort of trouble?

And why should it have caused any trouble? Only because there were more males about, pretending that if they stopped the game it would be a protest against the South African policy of apartheid. But from first to last no attempt was made to prove that any of the South African team supported apartheid, so harassment of them may have been as idiotic as beating a Tory M.P. for a misdeed committed by the Labour Government.

The incident was so gross a demonstration of male defect that the obvious thing, with the General Election looming up soon after, was to start an agitation to deprive men of the Parliamentary vote. But men do not excite censoriousness; and that is one of the most important differences between the sexes.

For women, as Eva Figes shows in "Patriarchal Attitudes," provoke censoriousness no end. Mrs. Figes has gathered a notable sheaf of quotations from the great didactics, beginning with Rousseau and coming to a climax with Freud, all looking at the opposite sex as if they had seen a ghost, turning white as a sheet, crying out that this is against nature, and working out rites of exorcism by restrictive conventions.

Even Darwin, whom one had thought of as a calm scientist, shakes like a leaf and makes the most astonishing allegations. According to him, the feminine virtues, though winning, are those found among "the lower races," and were survivals of past and inferior civilizations embedded in the species. My love is like a red, red rose and is also a fossilised Neanderthal.

Darwin ventured on an apothegm, not daring in itself, which it was nevertheless daring of a masculinist to attempt. "No one will dispute that the bull differs in disposition from the cow." The male had better be quiet about that.

The bull discharges a necessary function, but makes an unnecessary fuss about it. He spend his life enjoying agreeable relationships with the female of his species (brief, it is true, but he has no basis for comparison), with all found, and is asked for nothing more. Why does he bellow, paw the ground, chase harmless ramblers into hedges and seek to toss them on his horns in a frenzy of biologically useless rage?

If women were as censorious about men as men are about women, they would have something to say about the bull, whose case arouses various questions, such as why Napoleon did not stop fighting when he had consolidated the French Republic, and what about that extra male chromosome which makes the criminal.

But really, what a pack these masculinists are. Mrs. Figes exhumes for our benefit W.E.H. Lecky, the 19th-century historian who was of the opinion that the prostitute was "ultimately the most efficient guardian of virtue. But for her the unchallenged purity of countless happy homes would be polluted." And she has unearthed an even more painful quotation from this old humbug:

"There are always multitudes who in the period of their lives when their passions are most strong, are incapable of supporting children in their own social rank, and who would therefore injure society by marrying into it, but are nevertheless perfectly capable of securing an honourable career for their illegitimate children in the lower social sphere to which these would naturally belong."

Molière could have used this sentence as it stands in "Tartuffe," and sickening it is in its evocations of carefully kept account books and seduced housemaids.

But stuff as sickening has been written far nearer to our own time by others, including Sigmund Freud. It is curious that psychoanalysis, which has had such an immense influence on the 20th century, has injected Anglo-Saxon culture with the mores of 19th-century Jewish Vienna.

Freud, who would be 114 were he alive today, grew up in a stable economy which enabled Jewish households to support all their women-kind in comfortable homes with no other duty except to pamper their husbands and be pampered in the cosy traditions of their people.

When he went into psychiatric practice in the last decades of the 19th century he found that many of his women patients had developed other ideas and wished to use their brains and perhaps earn their own livings. This shocked him deeply, and he tried to rectify the situation by analysis, a theory which many patients encountered with amazement and which, here restated by Mrs. Figes, still seems amazing.

Freud preached that all little girls felt deprived and envious because they had not the same sexual organs as the male. When it was objected that many little girls knew nothing about the male sexual organs, he claimed that there was a bush telegraph in the unconscious which carried the news to the little girls.

Once Freud and his disciples got a female on the analytic couch and found traces of intellectual activity, they attempted to persuade her that she had prolonged the alleged little girl's alleged dream into adult life and was seeking in work a substitute for the male sexual organ.

When the female patients refused to accept all this nonsense, Freud and his disciples tied up the argument nicely on their side by calling the refusal psychical rigidity.

The question arises whether the human race has ever been as silly as it has become in our time. It adds a wild charm to the scene that of course the female patients were paying large fees for this depressant rough-housing.

"Patriarchal Attitudes" is perhaps more valuable as an anthology of masculinist excess than for Mrs. Figes's own theories, which would appear to better advantage if they were developed in a separate volume. As it is she seems to show undue pessimism about the possibility of men and women living in the same world. A bull may be noisy and dangerous, but it is not impossible to keep one.

Among the incidental material there is recorded the interesting fact that Mrs. Beatrice Webb declared at a public luncheon that she had never met a man, however inferior, "whom I do not consider to be my superior." She was, of course, speaking the truth. She was inferior to any man she met, and any woman too, because, brilliant, clever and fortunate, she was capable of making that statement without believing it, in order to increase her attraction and influence.

It is also interesting to note that Rousseau apparently did not know who Ninon de l'Enclos1 was. He wrote of a bluestocking: "From the lofty heights of her genius, she scorns every womanly duty and she is always trying to make a man of herself after the fashion of Madamoiselle de l'Enclos."

This is not what Ninon was doing, when last heard of.

1 Ninon de l'Enclos was a 17th century author, courtesan and patron of the arts, commemorated in Dorothy Parker's poem: "Ninon De Lenclos, On Her Last Birthday"

e-Book Women and Aging (Haworth Women's Studies) download

Women and Aging (Haworth Women's Studies) epub fb2

by Esther D. Rothblum,Ruth R. Thone,Ellen Cole
ISBN: 1560230053
ISBN13: 978-1560230052
language: English
Subcategory: Medicine
ISBN: 0940793121
ISBN13: 978-0940793125
language: English
Subcategory: Social Sciences
ISBN: 1897960980
ISBN13: 978-1897960981
language: English
Subcategory: Churches and Church Leadership
ISBN: 0812813324
ISBN13: 978-0812813326
language: English
Subcategory: Womens Studies
e-Book Your Patriarchal Blessing download

Your Patriarchal Blessing epub fb2

by Richard J. Allen,Ed J. Pinegar
ISBN: 1591568781
ISBN13: 978-1591568780
language: English
ISBN: 0413776549
ISBN13: 978-0413776549
language: English
Subcategory: World
ISBN: 0275929736
ISBN13: 978-0275929732
language: English
Subcategory: Social Sciences
ISBN: 0907582060
ISBN13: 978-0907582069
language: English Polish
Subcategory: Behavioral Sciences
ISBN: 0241118743
ISBN13: 978-0241118740
language: English
Subcategory: Contemporary
ISBN: 1856193055
ISBN13: 978-1856193054
language: English
Subcategory: Genre Fiction