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e-Book Deciphering the Indus Script download

e-Book Deciphering the Indus Script download

by Asko Parpola

ISBN: 0521430798
ISBN13: 978-0521430791
Language: English
Publisher: Cambridge University Press; First Edition edition (November 25, 1994)
Pages: 396
Category: Social Sciences
Subategory: Other

ePub size: 1265 kb
Fb2 size: 1817 kb
DJVU size: 1757 kb
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 408
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The Indus script developed in the Indus or Harappan Civilization, which flourished around 2500-1900 BC in what is now modern Pakistan

The Indus script developed in the Indus or Harappan Civilization, which flourished around 2500-1900 BC in what is now modern Pakistan. In this fascinating study, Professor Parpola outlines what is known about the Harappan culture and its script and proposes a method which will permit further progress in decipherment.

Deciphering the Indus Script. Generally recognized as the world's expert on the Indus script, Asko Parpola has been studying this undeciphered writing for over 40 years at the University of Helsinki in Finland. As Professor of Indology he has led a Finnish team of experts through numerous approaches to the puzzle of one of the world's very earliest writing systems. A grand summary of Dr. Parpola's work, Deciphering the Indus Script was published by Cambridge University Press in 1994.

Asko Parpola (born 12 July 1941 in Forssa) is a Finnish Indologist and Sindhologist, current professor emeritus of Indology and South Asian Studies at the University of Helsinki. He specializes in the Indus script. He is married to Marjatta Parpola, who has authored a study on the traditions of Kerala's Nambudiri Brahmins.

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Categories: Linguistics.

Asko Parpola resolved the puzzle over Indus script and in the debate whether it was Sanskrit or Dravidian, he proved it is Dravidian

Asko Parpola resolved the puzzle over Indus script and in the debate whether it was Sanskrit or Dravidian, he proved it is Dravidian. Mount Road Maha Vishnu, an English daily in its report dated 4 th April 2010 carried the following news;Asko Parpola, leading authority on the Indus script and Professor Emeritus of Indology in the University of Helsinki, Finland, has been chosen for the Kalaignar M. Karunanidhi Classical Tamil Award for 2009. He was selected for his work on the Dravidian hypothesis in interpreting.

Of the writing systems of the ancient world which still await deciphering, the Indus script is the most important. It developed in the Indus or Harappan Civilization, which flourished c. 2500-1900 BC in and around modern Pakistan, collapsing before the earliest historical records of South Asia were composed.

Indian archaeologist Shikaripura Ranganatha Rao claimed to have deciphered the Indus script.

Parpola led a Finnish team in the 1960s-80s that, like Knorozov's Soviet team, worked towards investigating the inscriptions using computer analysis. Based on a proto-Dravidian assumption, the teams proposed readings of many signs. Indian archaeologist Shikaripura Ranganatha Rao claimed to have deciphered the Indus script. He compared it to the Phoenician alphabet, and assigned sound values based on this comparison.

31 〕 Attempts at Deciphering the Indus Script Attempts at deciphering the Indus script started even before the exist- ence of the Indus Civilization was recognized.

The International Conference of Eastern Studies has this year its 50th jubilee session. 31 〕 Attempts at Deciphering the Indus Script Attempts at deciphering the Indus script started even before the exist- ence of the Indus Civilization was recognized. When Sir Alexander Cunningham reported the first known Indus seal from Harappa in 1875, he assumed that this unique find was a foreign import. Nearly 4,000 samples of the writing survive, mainly on stamp seals and amulets, but no translations.

Of the writing systems of the ancient world which still await deciphering, the Indus script is the most important. It developed in the Indus or Harappan Civilization, which flourished c. 2500-1900 BC in and around modern Pakistan, collapsing before the earliest historical records of South Asia were composed. Nearly 4,000 samples of the writing survive, mainly on stamp seals and amulets, but no translations. Professor Parpola is the chief editor of the Corpus of Indus Seals and Inscriptions. His ideas about the script, the linguistic affinity of the Harappan language, and the nature of the Indus religion are informed by a remarkable command of Aryan, Dravidian, and Mesopotamian sources, archaeological materials, and linguistic methodology. His fascinating study confirms that the Indus script was logo-syllabic, and that the Indus language belonged to the Dravidian family.
Comments:
Fenius
This is an excellent reference on the Indus script by a meticulous researcher whose breadth of knowledge spans the vast expanse of Indian proto-history. The book covers not just the Indus script but also ancient Indian religion and practises, theories of migrations, comparisons with Mesopotamia and other cultures, etc. The readings of some of the signs and seals is tantalizing, although these cannot be as yet confirmed due to the lack of bilinguals or other evidence.

Do not be fooled by the low ratings given by some reviewers who obviously have an axe to grind (they were probably disappointed that the book's conclusions do not support their Hindutva-motivated views). Go ahead and buy this book -- it is a must-have for anyone interested in the Indus civilization.

blac wolf
The book is more about Parpola's pet thesis that the Indian civilization is derivative to the Mesopotamian than about any real advance in the decipherment of the script. Parpola's thesis on the archaeological situation flies against the opinion of all the archaeologists and it is worthless.

Samulkree
I recently purchased this book and read this book extensively . I had a background in Sanskrit language and experience in reading Sanskrit literature for quite few years.
There are some good points and some bad points in this book.
The following are the good points.
a) He methodically and systematically explains the context of some of the glyphs.
b) His comparison of the some of the Indus seals with sumerian seals is reasonable and helps the reader to understand the thinking that prevailed in 3000 B.C.
c) His knowledge of South Indian languages is good.

Here are the negative points in his book.
a) He keeps proposing this theory that the so called Aryans came into Indus valley in 1400 B.C. This is not proven by any literary evidence or through archeological evidence. He proposes that Rig Veda was composed in 1200 B.C which is quite controverial.
b) His proto-dravidian construct words are not attested any where. This proto-dravidian hypothetical language never existed in the history of south India.

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