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e-Book Nobrow : The Culture of Marketing, the Marketing of Culture download

e-Book Nobrow : The Culture of Marketing, the Marketing of Culture download

by John Seabrook

ISBN: 0375704515
ISBN13: 978-0375704512
Language: English
Publisher: Vintage; 1st edition (February 6, 2001)
Pages: 240
Category: History and Criticism
Subategory: Photography

ePub size: 1846 kb
Fb2 size: 1454 kb
DJVU size: 1568 kb
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 712
Other Formats: lrf lit azw mbr

From John Seabrook, one of our most incisive and amusing cultural critics, comes Nobrow, a fascinatingly original look at the radical convergence of marketing and culture. In the old days, highbrow was elite and unique and lowbrow was commercial and mass-produced.

From John Seabrook, one of our most incisive and amusing cultural critics, comes Nobrow, a fascinatingly original look at the radical convergence of marketing and culture. Those distinctions have been eradicated by a new cultural landscape where good means popular, where artists From John Seabrook, one of our most incisive and amusing cultural critics, comes Nobrow, a fascinatingly original look at the radical convergence of marketing and culture

In his book Seabrook describes the key phenomena of nobrow: musical culture formed by MTV channel, Kurt Cobain and Nirvana – the primary destroyers of once unshakable barrier between the underground and pop-music, George Lucas and the Star Wars – the ne. .

In his book Seabrook describes the key phenomena of nobrow: musical culture formed by MTV channel, Kurt Cobain and Nirvana – the primary destroyers of once unshakable barrier between the underground and pop-music, George Lucas and the Star Wars – the new non-religious mythology, the media, The New Yorker magazine in particular, as exponents of the new nobrow cultural hierarchy, the fashion, where. the label has become much more important than good taste and style, the contemporary art and design

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Request PDF On Feb 1, 2001, John Seabrook and others published NOBROW : THE CULTURE OF MARKETING, THE . Nobrow culture rejects high/low culture's traditional obsession with quality in favor of authenticity.

Nobrow culture rejects high/low culture's traditional obsession with quality in favor of authenticity.

Seabrook at the 7 Moscow International Book Festival, 2012. Nobrow : the culture of marketing, the marketing of culture. Seabrook graduated from St. Andrew's School (DE) in 1976, Princeton University in 1981 and received an . in English Literature from Oxford. He began his career writing about business and published in a wide variety of magazines and newspapers, including Harper's, Vanity Fair, GQ, The Nation, The Village Voice, and the Christian Science Monitor.

This is Nobrow–the space between the familiar categories of high and low culture. These cultural equities rise and fall in the stock market of popular opinion, and therefore one has to manage one’s portfolio with care. In Nobrow, paintings by van Gogh and Monet are the headliners at the Bellagio Hotel while the Cirque du Soleil borrows freely from performance art in creating the Las Vegas spectacle inside. In Nobrow, artists show at K mart, museums are filled with TV screens, and the soundtrack of Titanic is not only a best-selling classical album but one that supports the dying classical enterprises of old-style highbrow musicians.

Prepare to enter the outrageous new world of Nobrow, where the old cultural distinctions - highbrow (Wagner's Ring), middlebrow (Masterpiece Theater), and lowbrow (the latest MTV video) - cease to exist

Prepare to enter the outrageous new world of Nobrow, where the old cultural distinctions - highbrow (Wagner's Ring), middlebrow (Masterpiece Theater), and lowbrow (the latest MTV video) - cease to exist. John Seabrook raises the curtain on an onrushing cultural phenomenon: the melding of culture with the marketing of culture and the culture of marketing.

From John Seabrook, one of our most incisive and amusing cultural critics, comes Nobrow, a fascinatingly original look at the radical convergence of marketing and culture.In the old days, highbrow was elite and unique and lowbrow was commercial and mass-produced. Those distinctions have been eradicated by a new cultural landscape where “good” means popular, where artists show their work at K-Mart, Titantic becomes a bestselling classical album, and Roseanne Barr guest edits The New Yorker: in short, a culture of Nobrow. Combining social commentary, memoir, and profiles of the potentates and purveyors of pop culture–entertainment mogul David Geffen, MTV President Judy McGrath, Snoop Doggy Dogg, Nobrow high-priest George Lucas, and others–Seabrook offers an enthralling look at our breakneck society where culture is ruled by the unpredictable Buzz and where even aesthetic worth is measured by units shipped.
Comments:
Uylo
This book is not as interesting as it sounds. The author has a single insight which he strings out over several hundred pages of gloriously self-indulgent prose.
The book sounded intriguing, so I bought it. The basic idea was interesting so I started to read it. The writing was facile and fluent, so I kept on reading, hoping to find something in it besides self-indulgent reflections on popular culture and how cool the author is to be on the "inside".
I believe that MTV has some kind of deep meaning, but this book's discussion of it fails to uncover that meaning. I suppose there is something new to say about Tina Brown and the New Yorker -- this book fails to say it.
This book holds the promise of explaining what the convolutions of the New yorker in recent years mean as a parable of the changing cultural mores. However, and sadly, it fails to deliver on its promise, and in the end is a self-indulgent memoir of one man's odessey through popular culture.
Not really bad, this book is primarily a disappointment.

Thomand
The book was not tarnished or ugly looking at all and the process of getting the book wasn't long at all.Good job Amazon.

Gaiauaco
John Seabrook's "Nobrow" fails on just about every level. The basic concept of this book is to explain how today's culture no longer separates activities and art into distinctions of "highbrow" and "lowbrow," and that really anything can be for anybody, albeit with slight modifications. As an example (assuming I'm reading this right), you could look at the world of fashion, where fashion icon trendsetters like actors and musicians might throw together an outfit based on stuff they found at thrift stores, clearly a source for lowbrow items. However, because this celebrity has sported this fashion, designers across the world will mimic this style, placing similar clothing styles, with better craftsmanship, in boutiques where the similar article of clothing may sell for hundreds of times what the celebrity paid for their initial outfit. The people buying the designer duds are purchasing them, thinking it's a "highbrow" investment, when really the same thing can be had at a "lowbrow" establishment (the thrift store), thus this item has transcended the easy identification and fallen into the realm of Seabrook's "nobrow."

Regretfully, he never explains what this has to do with marketing, as promised in the subtitle "The Culture of Marketing + The Marketing of Culture." Sure, there are snippets of this, particularly in the chapter discussing the band Radish and the "kid band" craze that also happened to involve Hanson. I'm willing to give Mr. Seabrook the benefit of the doubt, and maybe the publisher just wanted to attach that subtitle in an effort to convey the essence of the book to the short attention span-addled customer at the local Barnes & Noble.

The book succeeds in certain parts. Personally, I found the chapters about Ben Kweller and George Lucas to be particularly interesting, because I enjoy books about media and media marketing. Seabrook does have a way with words, and some of the descriptions of Ben Kweller's saga are quite good, though as a whole the book didn't have the "Klosterman-esque" feel I was hoping for.

In fact, my biggest complaint about the book is the author's tone of voice - that smug, detached, preppy rich boy in New York air of over-confidence. The man doesn't even bat an eyelash when confronted with a $200 price tag on a t-shirt, but on the first page of the book, he wants to convince the reader that his urban lifestyle (complete with Biggie Smallz lyrics) is authentic. He may very well have grown up in New York City, but Seabrook was definitely born with a silver spoon firmly planted in his mouth. No amount of borrowed gangsta-rap bling can hide that, and I find his attempt to be everything to every subculture not only unconvincing but outright appalling.

Dianantrius
Interestingly, I read this book in one setting, but, upon finishing it thought to myself: 'And what of it?' Never a good sign when reading, or reacting to, a book. I suppose I read it all in one sitting because I'm a devoted New Yorker reader and have lived in New York my entire life, so there was a large part of my ego that was gratified when I read references about which I was intimately familiar (New York City) or read references to the culture of a magazine I read regularly (The New Yorker).
But, again, what of it? All his observations are anecdotal but they don't add up to much beyond incidental coherence. For example, Seabrook refers to a 14-year-old kid who just signed a multi-million dollar recording contract with Mercury Records. In his recollection of his encounter with the kid, he makes reference to the kid playing Star Wars on Nintendo. Next chapter, Seabrook is out in California meeting with George Lucas to discuss the myth of Star Wars and understand for himself how Star Wars exemplifies the 'low brow' culture which is the centerpiece of the book.
Thus, incidental coherence. There is an incidental relationship between the teenager and George Lucas: namely, Lucas received more money in the year that the kid (or his parents) bought the game than if the kid never had the game. Perhaps I'm being too drastic here, but it seems that the message of the book is that low brow culture has permeated American (if not the world's) culture, and therefore, it is easy to make connections between seemingly unrelated phenomena, or phenomena that are only tangential or loosely related to one another. This is the narrative as told by anecdote: Anecdote A makes reference to issue 1, and issue 1 can be turned into anecdote B because it allows us to make reference to issue 2, et cetera. But, of course, given a large enough and vibrant enough culture (low or high) it is highly probable that seemingly unrelated anecdotes can be said to have common threads.
What of all this? Again, the same question.

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