pbstudio
e-Book The Other Classical Musics: Fifteen Great Traditions download

e-Book The Other Classical Musics: Fifteen Great Traditions download

by Michael Church

ISBN: 1843837269
ISBN13: 978-1843837268
Language: English
Publisher: Boydell Press (October 16, 2015)
Pages: 426
Category: Music
Subategory: Photography

ePub size: 1508 kb
Fb2 size: 1819 kb
DJVU size: 1381 kb
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 627
Other Formats: lrf txt azw rtf

The Other Classical Musics book.

The Other Classical Musics book. The chapters, contributed by various respected ethomusicologists, cover in turn Southeast Asia, Java, Japan, China, North India, South India, and Mande-speaking West Africa.

From 1992 to 2005 he reported on traditional musics all over the world for the BBC World Service; in 2004, Topic Records released a CD of his Kazakh field recordings and, in 2007, two further CDs of his recordings in Georgia and Chechnya.

Church, Michael, ed. The Other Classical Musics: Fifteen Great Traditions. Church explicitly denies that the book engages in a comparative study

Church, Michael, ed. Woodbridge, Suffolk, UK: The Boydell Press, 2015. xxi, 404 p. list of illustrations, contributors, notes, bibliographies, index. ISBN 978-184383726-8. Church explicitly denies that the book engages in a comparative study. He concedes that western classical music is better preserved in its music notation and institutions than the others, but eschews any sense ofcultural hierarchy, placing western classical music at a level with the rest.

What is classical music? This book answers the question in a manner never before attempted, by presenting the .

What is classical music? This book answers the question in a manner never before attempted, by presenting the history of fifteen parallel traditions, of which . .From 1992 to 2005 he reported on traditional musics all over the world for the BBC World Service; in 2004, Topic Records released a CD of his Kazakh field recordings and, in 2007, two further CDs of his recordings in Georgia and Chechnya.

More information: The Other Classical Musics – Boydell and Brewer.

The Other Classical Musics: Fifteen Great Traditions', explores World Music including folk traditions from the Middle East, the Indian sub-continent, the Far East, South-East Asia and North America. More information: The Other Classical Musics – Boydell and Brewer. Soapbox: Matthew Herbert. In another of our regular soapboxes, we invite Matthew Herbert, a composer and producer working in electronic music.

Among its many virtues, Michael Church's "The Other Classical Musics" can handily serve as a textbook for college and university courses that survey the musical Great Traditions of Eurasia and North Africa, music from the Silk Road lands, and kindred formulations of inter-regional and cross-cultural music studies.

Written by different scholars, each chapter has a common structure, with a concise outline of the instruments, the style and the social relations behind the music. In the chapter on classical Japanese music there is a wonderful illustration of two sheets of musical notation, one from 1303 and the other from the present day; their different styles hint at how the form has evolved. Classical Iranian music has likewise seen much change.

Church, music critic for this newspaper, has orchestrated a truly invaluable volume. From Thailand to Tajikistan, these 15 reader-friendly essays by experts introduce a worldwide range of classical practices in composition and performance. Inevitably, that key term stays fluid, although Church makes a brave stab at defining a classical tradition, from built-in continuity and a quasi-priesthood of professionals to high-status patronage and the evolution of a canon. He also harmonises the format of each essay.

This book answers the question in a manner never before attempted, by presenting the history of fifteen parallel traditions, of which Western classical music is just one. Each music is analysed in terms of its modes, scales, and theory; its instruments, forms, and aesthetic goals; its historical development, golden age, and condition today; and the conventions governing its performance. The writers are leading ethnomusicologists, and their approach is based on the belief that music is best understood in the context of the culture which gave rise to it.

Winner of the Royal Philharmonic Society Music Award for Creative Communication 2015 There is a treasure trove of underappreciated music out there; this book will convince many to explore it.

What is classical music? This book answers the question in a manner never before attempted, by presenting the history of fifteen parallel traditions, of which Western classical music is just one. Each music is analysed in terms of its modes, scales, and theory; its instruments, forms, and aesthetic goals; its historical development, golden age, and condition today; and the conventions governing its performance. The writers are leading ethnomusicologists, and their approach is based on the belief that music is best understood in the context of the culture which gave rise to it . By including Mande and Uzbek-Tajik music - plus North American jazz - in addition to the better-known styles of the Middle East, the Indian sub-continent, the Far East, and South-East Asia, this book offers challenging new perspectives on the word 'classical'. It shows the extent to which most classical traditions are underpinned by improvisation, and reveals the cognate origins of seemingly unrelated musics; it reflects the multifarious ways in which colonialism, migration, and new technology have affected musical development, and continue to do today. With specialist language kept to a minimum, it's designed to help both students and general readers to appreciate musical traditions which may be unfamiliar to them, and to encounter the reality which lies behind that lazy adjective 'exotic'. MICHAEL CHURCH has spent much of his career in newspapers as a literary and arts editor; since 2010 he has been the music and opera critic of The Independent. From 1992 to 2005 he reported on traditional musics all over the world for the BBC World Service; in 2004, Topic Records released a CD of his Kazakh field recordings and, in 2007, two further CDs of his recordings in Georgia and Chechnya. Contributors: Michael Church, Scott DeVeaux, Ivan Hewett, David W. Hughes, Jonathan Katz, Roderic Knight, Frank Kouwenhoven, Robert Labaree, Scott Marcus, Terry E. Miller, Dwight F. Reynolds, Neil Sorrell, Will Sumits, Richard Widdess, Ameneh Youssefzadeh
Comments:
Raelin
Designed for the musically literate, this representational survey of sophisticated classical world music (jazz included) has 15 chapters written by expert American and European ethnomusicologists, but it is far from the usual arid academic textbook. Indeed, the editor Michael Church ensured a standard structure and stylistic approach. Moreover, his introduction is strikingly lucid yet rich, wide-ranging, and profound in insights. The evolutional onslaught of Western scales and tuning, instruments, and homogenizing fusion with its influences of African, Latin, and Asian music bring world classical music in peril toward being museum relics. A quick thumb-through will evidence the excellent selection of illustrative photographs, both historical and contemporary. The chapters, minimally, have sections on national and regional history, musical forms and influences, instrumentation, performance and social applications, modes and rhythms, and contemporary status, with recommended readings and discography. The detailed book is highly useful and a joy, even for this well-versed and experienced world music aficionada.

First up is Southeast Asia, with emphasis on Thailand and its ensemble form, fixed compositions, oral transmission, and instrumentation of xylophone metallophones, drum percussion, reed flute, and fiddle, and use of seven core pitches. Vietnam is differentiated by its Chinese and later French musical influence, its modes and improvisations, and also solo or chamber approach. Lutes, zither, transverse flute, and monochord are also distinctive, though Chinese parallels are obvious. Next, is Java, Indonesia, and its famous gamelan orchestras of voice, metallophones, flute, rebab spiked fiddle, and drums, which drew Ravel, Poulenc, and other Western classical composers into its mesmerizing fluid sound. Gamelans may be found at many large universities, such as at Berkeley, California, and Madison, Wisconsin. This chapter includes comments on the manufacture of the various gongs and xylophones. Indonesian gamelans have two tones, the pentatonic sléndro and the 7-note, 3 pentatonic scales pélog. The pitches are not standardized by frequency and each gamelan has different tones for the scales. The book now travels north to Japan, whose traditional music and instruments of koto, shamisen, shakuhachi, taiko drums, and flutes are familiar to Western audiences. Classical discussions include court gakaku, a direct import and adaptation from China, with biwa and sho, and the theatrical noh and kabuki forms. The Zen Buddhist association with shakuhachi is also described. Then comes China, meaning dominant Han musical forms, as China is an empire with numerous minorities, including Tibetans, Mongolians, Miao, and Uigurs. The emphasis is on the qin, a truly ancient zither whose tradition goes back to the Tang Dynasty 7th-10th centuries and before. There is a separate chapter on Chinese opera. The next destination is southwestward to India, with chapters on the well-known northern Hindustani and southern Karnatic traditions. Ravi Shankar, Ali Akbar Khan, Zakir Hussain, Jasraj: enough said for the northern school, except that the historical section is a helpful summary with little known perspectives, and the brief commentary on vocal technique is a welcome addition. The Karnatic tradition also has ragas and devotional forms, but it has little Persian influence and its sound is more ornamental of tighter range. Its instruments are chiefly veena, violin, small double-sided mridangamn barrel drum and its larger tavil cousin, bamboo venu flute, and a long horn, the nadaswaram. The clay pot, ghatam, and hand cymbals and other percussion supplement the mix. The rhythms are limited to 7 talas and have different beat arrangements than the northern styles. In 1980s, it was South African music that dominated our musical impression of Africa but today it is Mande griot music from Senegal, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, and especially Mali that dominate the charts. From kora harp and balafon bamboo xylophone to ngoni lutes and electric guitars this music is discussed avidly. Unfortunately, this chapter represents all of Africa, and the author admits that missing Baka of the Camaroon, Tuareg of the Sahara, Shona mbrira music of Zambia, and many other regional classical forms is a shame. The following chapter is on American jazz, and I scratch my head. The chapter opens a can of worms and I now move on to Europe, yes, all of Europe, meaning our standard classical Western music in spite of the very title of this book! Getting back on track is the Arabo-Andalusian music that exiled from Spain to North Africa and on to Syria. Nuba suites and muwashshah poetry were performed by Muslim, Christian, and Jewish musicians in medieval Spain. Today, classical concerts may be found, but the Sufis routinely maintain the essential form in their rites. This is an important chapter the deserves attention. Next, we go to the Arab Middle East where vocalist Umm Kulthum, maqams (more than modes or scales but also intervals, phrase patterns, and modulations), and the chief instruments of oud lute, riqq tamborine, qanun zither, and ney flute of the classical takht ensemble are presented. Improvisations within rules are known as taksim. The chapter on Turkish classical music is really Ottoman and Sufi music with Arabic and Persian-derived instruments, and the few pages can only whet the appetite to learn more. Iran naturally comes next with zarb drum, tar lute, kamancheh spiked fiddle, santur zither. Its dastgah modes are the basis of profound music that match well with the poetry of Rumi. The last chapter introduces little known music of Uzbekistan and Tajikistan and their Central Asian neighbors. In short, for an impressive introduction to the more traditional music of the world, Church and colleagues have produced a worthy book that will be welcome by world music students. The Aga Khan Trust for Culture helped in production.

Whitehammer
I really, really wish this book had a chapter for people who are not musically trained. It doesn't need to be that hard, just needs to cover basic terms like 'measure' or 'modal'. I think the authors lost a huge opportunity when they decided to focus only on musically trained people. I love listening to music from around the world, and was really looking forward to understanding those systems a bit more in depth.

Cogelv
Love it. Great Book!

Tiv
It came from Great Britain in perfect condition.

ISBN: 0634058290
ISBN13: 978-0634058295
language: English
Subcategory: Music
ISBN: 185743174X
ISBN13: 978-1857431742
language: English
Subcategory: Music
ISBN: 0130143596
ISBN13: 978-0130143594
language: English
Subcategory: Music
ISBN: 8185938431
ISBN13: 978-8185938431
language: English
Subcategory: Music
ISBN: 0195063341
ISBN13: 978-0195063349
language: English
Subcategory: Music
ISBN: 0754628590
ISBN13: 978-0754628590
language: English
Subcategory: Music
ISBN: 0195053427
ISBN13: 978-0195053425
language: English
Subcategory: Music
ISBN: 0195885953
ISBN13: 978-0195885958
language: English
Subcategory: Performing Arts
ISBN: 8124601348
ISBN13: 978-8124601341
language: English
Subcategory: Music
ISBN: 0714537942
ISBN13: 978-0714537948
language: English
Subcategory: Music