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e-Book Losing the Light: Terry Gilliam and the Munchausen Saga download

e-Book Losing the Light: Terry Gilliam and the Munchausen Saga download

by Andrew Yule

ISBN: 155783346X
ISBN13: 978-1557833464
Language: English
Publisher: Applause Theatre & Cinema Books (April 1, 2000)
Pages: 264
Category: Music
Subategory: Photography

ePub size: 1502 kb
Fb2 size: 1233 kb
DJVU size: 1562 kb
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 631
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Andrew Yule's book focuses a good portion of the film's story on the financial woes and personalities that plauged .

Andrew Yule's book focuses a good portion of the film's story on the financial woes and personalities that plauged this film from its very genesis. How much of the blame belongs to Gilliam becomes an increasingly moot point as the book takes you from one disaster to another.

Losing the Light book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Heaven's Gate, by comparison, was a party in Paradise. Start by marking Losing the Light: Terry Gilliam & the Munchausen Saga as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Book Format: Paperback. Never ending troubles with the crew is a constant source of dark entertainment, from overpriced handlers for a dog with five minutes of screen time, to crew relatives renting their personal vehicles out to the production as transportation, to crew members taking bets on who would be the first to 'deflower' the underage Uma Therman.

Andrew Yule goes behind the scenes of Gilliam's epic and unravels, twist by agonizing twist, the contorted drama .

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Losing the Light : Terry Gilliam and .

New York, NY : Applause Books. Losing the light : Terry Gilliam and the Munchausen saga, by Andrew Yule Applause Books New York, NY 1991. Australian/Harvard Citation.

In between the lighter moments on set, there were so many calamities during the making of the film, big and small, that Gilliam points to Andrew Yule’s Losing the Light: Terry Gilliam and the Munchausen Saga as a guide that even he learned of stories from. He points out that problems began with the Munchausen production early on, observing, The financial side was really chaotic, and within the first six weeks it was predicted that continuing as we were it would go way, way, way over budget. It was just this constant nightmare.

Terrence Vance Gilliam (/ˈɡɪliəm/; born 22 November 1940) is an American-born British screenwriter, film director, animator, actor, comedian and former member of the Monty Python comedy troupe

Terrence Vance Gilliam (/ˈɡɪliəm/; born 22 November 1940) is an American-born British screenwriter, film director, animator, actor, comedian and former member of the Monty Python comedy troupe. Gilliam has directed 13 feature films, including Time Bandits (1981), Brazil (1985), The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1988), The Fisher King (1991), 12 Monkeys (1995), Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1998), The Brothers Grimm (2005), Tideland (2005), and The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus (2009).

Losing the Light : Terry Gilliam and the Munchausen Saga. Mourners at the funeral of Australian drug-smuggler and Bali Nine member Andrew Chan have been read his self-written eulogy. People also love these ideas. Leashing the TempestNOOK Book. The NOOK Book (eBook) of the Leashing the Tempest by Jenn Bennett at Barnes & Noble. What others are saying.

But studio battles over his uncompromising artistic vision, as well as production problems and massive cost overruns (as documented in books like Jack Mathews' The Battle Of Brazil and Andrew Yule's Losing The Light: Terry Gilliam And The Munchausen Saga), have at times made him look unemployable. Still, he's consistently bounced back with new, critically acclaimed projects. Gilliam's last completed film, 1998's Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas, adapted Hunter S. Thompson's 1971 book of the same name into an intense, delirious cinematic fever dream

(Applause Books). Mix one American director with a German producer on a period extravaganza, set the locations in Italy and Spain and start the cameras rolling without enough money to do the job. Then sit back and watch disaster strike. That is the scenario Andrew Yule has painstakiingly reconstructed. The more problems and reverses, the greater our interest: costly postponements, overwhelming language difficulties, elephants and tigers turning on their trainers, illnesses, sets not being ready, special effects breaking down and cameo stars (from Marlon Brando to Sean Connery) backing out of the project. You name it, Andrew Yule reports it!
Comments:
Shomeshet
Andrew Yule's book focuses a good portion of the film's story on the financial woes and personalities that plauged this film from its very genesis. As I read the book I was stunned how anyone could let a production spiral so out of control, particularly given the option of shooting in a country that, on occasion, had problems with sucking up money for production (Italy in this case), or a place where even though things would be expensive, could create a film given a specific budget.

Given all the woes and ramifications of this production, it's a wonder anyone was kept at all. As I read the book I was convinced that it was all an act to drive away potential film makers to cut down on competition on content and jobs in the film industry. Then I thought maybe it was a giant sting to nab every small time mafioso in Italy, and that there was a whole law enforcement aspect going on behind-BEHIND the scenes that were weren't privy to.

But, in the end, it came down to an over excuberrant personality who was not adequate for the task at hand, even though the book correctly points out that without Tom Schuley, a man who can be described as certifiably insane (not a joke), the film might not have gotten made in the first place, or, if it did, then it certainly would not have been the vision Terry Gilliam eventually put up on screen for audiences to enjoy. He was the driving force to get the movie started, but unfortunately, due to his "stuff bills in the desk drawer" approach to book keeping, and inability to assume the producer's role after key personnel left and walked out on him, nearly drove the film into ruin.

Or so it appeared. My guess is that Schuley had more connections than anyone else was letting on, but that his role as a functional producer is probably more a manufacture than a matter of honest assessment.

For all that, for all the fighting that went on over budgets, scheduling, and other paper work, and work regarding the paper infrastructure, there was little emphasis on looking at the shooting style, little on the selection of art direction, though a strong emphasis on meshing personalities, and adorning the book with anecdotes regarding personalities, what they did, how outrageous it was, and ultimately what a circus had been generated of the movie's very production.

The book is more or less a look at the interpersonal struggle of director Terry Gilliam to shoot a film with a seemingly heartfelt desire to create something really magnificent for his children and other children, using some of the best talent in Europe, and to bring it in at a cut rate by shooting in a nation whose currency is prone to mercurial like behavior. Whatever promise a weak Lire and cheap but artistically sound and skilled Italian crew and sound stage facilities, the decision eventually blew up the cost of the film to twice its promised cost.

The book reveals the potential roles Marlon Brando and Sean Connery might have contributed to the film, but does little to give us insight to the larger concept of the film. How and why shots were selected, or the genesis of the story itself (the story is actually a conglomeration of a Russian folk tale; "The Fool of the World" and Raspe's German character). The book also tries to be somewhat historical by stating that Baron Munchausen fought against the Turks. The truth be told Baron Munchausen was a German mercenary who actually fought for the Turks, and was prone to telling tall tales, which is part of how he got his reputation, even to the point of a psychological disorder being named after him. The book focuses on "star power", which is disappointing, and how "star power" gears meshes (or ground) against the shooting schedule, cost over runs, and budgetary limitations.

If you're looking for a book on the making of the film, then there's not much else out there. If you're a film student who like the movie, and wondered how it was made, then all I can say is let this tome be a civil warning to your aspirations on how not to shoot a film. If someone promises you you can shoot a film cheaper in Mexico, Tunisia, Turkey, France, the Philippines, or Country-X, then demand to hire an accountant, and have him run some projected figures. ALSO, make sure you get some kind of lay of the land of what previous films were shot there, how they were shot, and why they were successes or failures.

Look, I love this film. Even for all of its cinematic flaws (the models in the ballroom dancing scene, the minis looking like miniatures, and some borderline blue-screen work), the film is good, but only because Terry Gilliam knows how to direct actors and knows how to get a shot (the whole shot with a horse on a rowboat with a little girl and explosions going off around it, not withstanding).

Buy it, read it, take notes on how NOT to shoot a major feature film.

Malak
For serious film films who are as engrossed with the behind the scenes insanity as what goes up onto the screen.

funike
Most stories about film production train wrecks usually involve out-of-control directors sabotaging their own films through outrageous attention to detail and a flippant attitude towards budgetary concerns. While Terry Gilliam is not immune to similar criticism (The Man From La Mancha, for example), Losing the Light is an extraordinary account of how The Adventures of Baron Munchhausen was almost completely destroyed by the faulty, incompetent, and borderline criminally negligent production itself, spearheaded by the highly delusional German producer Thomas Schühly. How much of the blame belongs to Gilliam becomes an increasingly moot point as the book takes you from one disaster to another. Never ending troubles with the crew is a constant source of dark entertainment, from overpriced handlers for a dog with five minutes of screen time, to crew relatives renting their personal vehicles out to the production as transportation, to crew members taking bets on who would be the first to 'deflower' the underage Uma Therman. Whatever could go wrong most certainly did, and the biggest surprise is that the film was ever completed at all. If you like behind-the-scenes filmmaking disaster stories, this is one of the best.

Briciraz
While the sheer mess surrounding the production of "The Adventures of Baron Munchausen" might massively overshadow the troubles Gilliam had during "Brazil", this book is nowhere near as entertaining its "Brazil" counterpart. While this book is undoubtedly accurate and unquestionably in-depth, it is also written in an incredibly dry and uninteresting way. It reads almost like a series of dry facts, with little or nothing to help lighten it or make it more readable.

The readability of this book might have something with "Baron Munchausen's" production difficulties: Whereas "Brazil's" struggle for life gradually built up to a crescendo, "Baron Munchausen's" started off badly, and spent the rest of its time trying cope. It was, by all accounts, a slow and painful slog. Unfortunately, this book captures that feeling far too well.

There are some occassional anecdotes, but mostly it feels like a long list of lawyers coming in, being replaced, arguments, memos, and much passing of the buck.

The short version is: Gilliam was looking for a producer for his new film. Enter young ambitious German producer, Thomas Schühly. He's the type of guy who claims he's done everything and can sweet talk those who hear what they want to hear. Gilliam wants to hear certain things, like the fact that his next film, "Baron Munchausen" is possible to make for $23 million... the absolute maximum that Columbia Pictures is prepared to pay for it. Everyone thinks it's impossible, but Schühly insists it's possible... if they shoot in Italy. Columbia is sceptical, but eventually buys into it, provided there's a bond company guaranteeing the production. Gilliam claps his hands merrily and gets ready to make another film.

Except Schühly's estimates were as off as everyone thought they were. The film goes massively over-budget and Gilliam is left fighting the studio and bonds company every step of the way. Thomas Schühly is nowhere to be found, and when he is found, it's most definitely not his fault.

Eventually the film gets made, but not without ruining Gilliam's reputation and scarring everyone involved. Final cost (thanks to many stops and starts) $46 million.

By the time the film is released, a new regime is in place at Columbia. The new regime apparently has no faith in the film and decides to bury it as an embarrassment of the old order, despite the fact that it tests well, is reviewed well, and earns a huge amount of money in the few cinemas it opens in.

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