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e-Book Slanguage: A Dictionary of Irish Slang download

e-Book Slanguage: A Dictionary of Irish Slang download

by Bernard Share

ISBN: 0717134741
ISBN13: 978-0717134748
Language: English
Publisher: Gill & Macmillan Ltd (April 1, 2003)
Pages: 432
Category: Dictionaries and Thesauruses
Subategory: Reference

ePub size: 1579 kb
Fb2 size: 1504 kb
DJVU size: 1520 kb
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 993
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This book goes into much detail of the slang, sayings and dialect in Ireland, IF. .2 people found this helpful.

This book goes into much detail of the slang, sayings and dialect in Ireland, IF you are solely interested in the northern part of the country.

It has dropped a few that have fallen out of favor and has revised others.

Used-like N : The book pretty much look like a new book. There will be no stains or markings on the book, the cover is clean and crisp, the book will look unread, the only marks there may be are slight bumping marks to the edges of the book where it may have been on a shelf previously. Read full description. See details and exclusions. Pre-owned: lowest price.

Dublin 1997, 2005, 2008. Legal Information - Terms and Conditions.

If you don't, you need to be.

Irish Terminology G-M. Slang Word or Phrase. I am so glad you enjoyed this compilation of Irish slang. Very helpful for my book that is based out of Dingle Ireland, and I am a California girl! Galexia Morgan. Many are used without us even realizing we must sound odd to foreign visitors! Hopefully you will get to visit us over this neck of the woods and have a head start in the speech!

Sean McMahon, Irish Independent.

Hiberno-English is the common speech of Ireland at all social levels. Sean McMahon, Irish Independent. John Slevin, RTÉ Guide. Much of the book is a joy to read. Brian Griffin, International Journal of Lexicography. This is quite simply an outstandingly brilliant piece of Sherlock-Holmesing, characterised by both authenticity and wi.

His novels include Inish and Transit. Several of his works have been reissued by Dalkey Archive Press, as part of the John F. Byrne Irish Literature Series. He was one of the founders, and the first secretary, of Publishing Ireland, the Irish booksellers' association.

Much of the book is a joy to read. Aubrey Malone, Books Ireland.

Are you a holy terror? Are you a go-boy? Could you live on the skin of a rasher? Or are you so hungry that you eat a farmer's arse through a hedge? When you're on the razz, do you get so buckled, crippled and scuttered that you can't get your back outa the scratcher in the morning? Never mind the answers. If you understand the questions you are in Slanguage country. If you don't, you need to be. This is the dictionary that glosses the words that real Irish people use in the streets each day, every day. Slang is elusive. Some words and phrases are always there. Others slip in and out of usage according to the whims of fashion. This expanded edition of the standard dictionary of Irish slang includes many entries not in the 1997 edition. It has dropped a few that have fallen out of favour, and has revised others. In all, this edition is 25 per cent longer than its predecessor. It will confirm Bernard Share's invaluable book in its position as the major work of its kind, combining scholarship and a keen sense of fun. Slanguage does justice to it by taking it seriously, but not too seriously.
Comments:
catterpillar
This book goes into much detail of the slang, sayings and dialect in Ireland, IF you are solely interested in the northern part of the country. The author obviously did their research in Ulster and sadly neglected the largest area of the island. In localizing his search to this small area they have made shortchanged their readers. They neglected to take anything from places like Dublin, Cork, Kerry, Limerick, all places with a wealth of slang all of their own. As well as these places, they omitted the more general slang that is used across the country as a whole. My wife and I were sadly disappointed with this badly put together, badly researched, badly localized waste of paper!

from earth
Words and phrases reference, some even have references to where they were used in a movie, book or play.
I laughed out loud and my daughter says,"Your reading a dictionary?" I say, "Tis more then that my eye bright baa."

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Tehn
Unfortunately, the word 'slang' has become misused to mean a body of language that refers to sexual and often perverted practices. This collection does NOT use the word 'slang' in that narrow modern context. Here 'slang' is used merely in the sense of 'vulgar' in its etymological sense (i.e. to refer to 'common'colloquial forms of the language). Infact what is so interesting is that the entries, even for the Irish themselves are not all that common. The reader can find so much that is new on every single page. This is an exellent collection of Hiberno-English (Irish English) vocabulary. The author often provides the etymology from the actual Irish language (as opposed to Irish/Hiberno-English) and also locates certain words that were coined (or used ) by writers by quoting judicious extracts showing the original context of such terms. Another important point is that the words do not usually refer to ordinary translateable concepts but are often fascinating examples of unique terms that cover concepts in Irish folklore, history or everyday life for which there is no equivalent. This collection will be enjoyed not only by the Irish but by any serious specialist in dialects of the English language. A masterpiece!

Drelalen
If you have the time and/or inclination to incorporate the minutiae validating a myriad of "Irish Slang Terms," archaic and/or contemporary, this is the tome for you! "Slanguage" is EXACTLY as the title implies: a dictionary. B. Share is to be highly commended for having taken extreme measures to provide a reference work that is extensive in scope, cross-referenced, as well as based on scholarly citations. It is an excellent reference work to supplement any interest and/or study of "slang" attributed to, or regarding, the Irish. This book is written in the English language for the faint-hearted, and knowledge of Irish Gaelic is not necessary to enjoy and/or employ any and/or all of the cited words and/or phrases. A few Irish Gaelic words so citical to some idioms are present, and their meanings are immediately contextually present. In all of critcal acclaim that rightfully belongs to "Slanguage: A Dictionary of Irish Slang," buyer beware: It IS as it proclaims itself to be: a dictionary.

Hap
As difficult as the Gaelic language is to learn, imagine my surprise when I realized that it also contains SLANG! Just like any other language. As you listen to a character in a movie, or read a book set in Ireland, you want to know just what "that word" means. So, after finding Slanguage, I have been able to decipher phrases that were lost to me. Hey, nothing like calling your boss an eejit, and he has NO idea you think he is a buffoon!

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