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e-Book In Fact: Essays on Writers and Writing download

e-Book In Fact: Essays on Writers and Writing download

by Thomas Mallon

ISBN: 0375409165
ISBN13: 978-0375409165
Language: English
Publisher: Pantheon; 1 edition (January 2, 2001)
Pages: 368
Category: Writing Research and Publishing Guides
Subategory: Reference

ePub size: 1297 kb
Fb2 size: 1722 kb
DJVU size: 1769 kb
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 108
Other Formats: lrf mbr azw docx

Электронная книга "In Fact: Essays on Writers and Writing", Thomas Mallon

Электронная книга "In Fact: Essays on Writers and Writing", Thomas Mallon. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "In Fact: Essays on Writers and Writing" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

In Fact collects the best of Thomas Mallon's superb criticism from the past twenty-two years - essays that appeared in. .

Here are his evaluations of the work of contemporary writers such as Nicholson Baker, Peter Carey, Tom Wolfe, Do DeLillo, Joan Didion, and Robert Stone, and reassessments of such earlier twentieth-century figures as John O'Hara, Sinclair Lewis, Truman Capote, and Mary McCarthy. Mallon also considers an array of odd literary genres and phenomena-including book indexes, obituaries, plagiarism, cancelled checks, fan mail, and author tours.

ISBN13:9780375409165.

Thus, Thomas Mallon's collection of essays about books, writers and writing is as engaging as good conversation. Mallon has the credentials. In Fact is a collection of the best of his work from the past 20 years.

Upchurch, Michael (January 20, 2002).

Thomas Mallon (born November 2, 1951) is an American novelist, essayist, and critic. His novels are renowned for their attention to historical detail and context and for the author's crisp wit and interest in the "bystanders" to larger historical events. In A Book of One’s Own, Mallon covers a wide range of diarists from Samuel Pepys to Anais Nin. He explained his enthusiasm for the genre by saying: Writing books is too good an idea to be left to authors  . Upchurch, Michael (January 20, 2002). How history happens".

How to Write Better Essays. Key Concepts in Politics. TOEFL essay,you will have only thirty minutes to do all of this Assign essay topics from this list. Andrew Heywood toefl essay writing. 38 MB·42,287 Downloads. Academic Writing from Paragraph to Essay. 44 MB·27,915 Downloads. have learned about paragraphs to essay writing.

Books are the fellow friend of us with no demands and no complaints; they . Essay - 1 (400 Words).

Books are the fellow friend of us with no demands and no complaints; they just give us a kind of happiness in the form of improved knowledge, wisdom, information, entertainment and always help in taking the right decisions in life. Sample Essay on Books for Students. Books are the collection of words which form different types of stories, poems, articles on different issues, topic wise essays, helpful guidelines or many other knowledge based information related to any kind of imaginary or existing things in this world.

Thomas Mallon's writing style is characterized by charm, wit, and a meticulous . In fact : essays on writers and writing.

Thomas Mallon's writing style is characterized by charm, wit, and a meticulous attention to detail and character development. His nonfiction often explores "fringe" genres-diaries, letters, plagiarism-just as his fiction frequently tells the stories of characters "on the fringes of big events. In A Book of One's Own, Mallon covers a wide range of diarists from Samuel Pepys to Anais Nin. He explained his enthusiasm for the genre by saying: "Writing books is too good an idea to be left to authors  .

In Fact: Essays on Writers and Writing. Thomas Mallon's survey of diarists throughout the ages introduces us to the most personal writings of more than 100 diarists, including Samuel Pepys, Leonardo da Vinci, Virginia Woolf, and Lee Harvey Oswald. Mallon divides the diarists into seven rs, travelers, pilgrims, creators, apologists, confessors, and prisoners-that he uses as a basis for his inquiries into the nature of these apparently private writings

From the acclaimed novelist (Henry and Clara, Two Moons), essayist (A Book of One's Own), and critic (1998 National Book Critics Circle Citation for Excellence in Reviewing)--an engaging new collection of essays. In Fact gathers the best of Thomas Mallon's superb criticism from the past twenty-two years--essays that appeared in his GQ column, "Doubting Thomas," and in The New York Times Book Review, The American Scholar, The New Yorker, and Harper's, among other publications. Here are his evaluations of the work of contemporary writers such asNicholson Baker, Peter Carey, Tom Wolfe, Do DeLillo, Joan Didion, and Robert Stone, and reassessments of such earlier twentieth- century figures as John O'Hara, Sinclair Lewis, Truman Capote, and Mary McCarthy. Mallon also considers an array of odd literary genres and phenomena--including book indexes, obituaries, plagiarism, cancelled  checks, fan mail, and author tours. And he turns his sharp eye on historical fiction (his own genre) as well as on the history, practice, and future of memoir.Smart, unorthodox, and impassioned, this collection is an integral piece of an important literary career and an altogether marvelous read.
Comments:
Whitecaster
Art Cooper's GQ was probably the best magazine of its time (turn of the millennium), and Thomas Mallon was one of the regular columnists who made it great. I picked up this book (or e-book) as an antidote to the overrated The Broken Estate: Essays on Literature and Belief (Modern Library Paperbacks).

Personally, I think Mallon deserves the Pulitzer Prize for calling his David Guterson review "Snow Falling on Readers." Here is the opening of his review of another contemporary:

NO, A Man in Full is not as good as The Bonfire of the Vanities, so why don’t we get that out of the way right here at the start, and even offer a couple of excuses. For one thing, few American novels of the last twenty years have been as good as Tom Wolfe’s first work of fiction (published in 1987, when he was 56), and for another, the ’90s haven’t been anything so wonderful—O tempora! O mores!—as the ’80s. Back then we had a real presid— No, let me restrain myself. Let me start over. Let me make the simple bipartisan literary point that when it comes to subject matter, the ’90s have not been quite so outsize as the ’80s, which is only to say that no current novel can be expected to get so gaudy a purchase on this period as Bonfire did on its own...

What can I say? This is a very appealing style. Here are two quotes from an essay on Sinclair Lewis which are both spot on:

... The lack of much emotional development in Lewis’s characters may make for a certain psychological realism, but it also results in narrative tedium. These very long books consist largely of characters who are constantly lapsing back into being themselves, opening and shutting like morning glories. It is odd that novels with such attitude, such thematic edge, should be so shapeless, so spasmodic and repetitious.
[...]
Lewis is to slang what Mark Twain is to dialect. He has a grotesque facility for reproducing it, a talent like playing the saw or cracking knuckles. The listener concedes the skill being displayed while begging the performer to stop. Whether it’s Elmer Gantry’s sermons (he has one called “Whoa Up, Youth!”) or the patter of Babbitt’s little manicurist (“[B]elieve me, I know how to hop those birds! I just give um the north and south and ask um, ‘Say, who do you think you’re talking to?’ and they fade away like love’s young nightmare”), Lewis has some of the sharpest nails on the American blackboard. The British edition of Babbitt even required a glossary.

The literary tour of New Orleans was a standout, and made me want to read A Confederacy of Dunces, as well as American Grotesque, which I hadn't heard of before.

After the contemporary reviews, and the classical authors, come a batch of fine personal essays, and observations on the writer's life:

.... The owners and small staffs of the “independents,” those unchained stores doing battle with every new Barnes & Noble and Borders, not only sell books but read them, too. They’d rather evangelize for favorite titles than talk business, but when asked, they’ll tell you they’re holding their own—as long as the superstores stay fifteen miles away. You shake your head and sympathize and avoid mentioning the one thing you and most of the writers you know like about the bibliobehemoths: the way they’ve got room to keep even your oldest, obscurest paperback displayed on their shelves. Still, your heart is with the indies during this bewildering retail revolution that’s only begun.

I'm not even sure I've chosen the best excerpts (there are so many). I like a book of essays the way some people like a cozy mystery. This was my kind of book.

Bluddefender
This book was a delight. I had read two of Mallon's books - "Stolen Words" (on plagiarism) and "A Book of One's Own" (people and their diaries) - quite some time ago, and found them both charming and fascinating. So maybe the charm of these essays shouldn't have been a surprise. But I was bowled over, both by the breadth and depth of Mallon's coverage. Not to engage in hagiography, but he comes close to my notion of a perfect reviewer. In many instances his evaluations are a more eloquent expression of my own thoughts about a particular book or author. And in those cases where our evaluations were different, his views are expressed with a persuasive clarity that stimulates me to go back to the work in question and see what I might have missed. He's smart, erudite, witty, someone who has obviously read widely, with catholic tastes and a broad-ranging curiosity. But, refreshingly, his criticism comes squarely from the point of view of someone who obviously wants to give the writer the benefit of the doubt. Which is not to say that he pulls his punches, but there is none of the besetting sin that afflicts most critics - the cruel putdown whose primary aim is to remind you of the critic's own smartness. Nor does he ever give the sense of targeting someone solely because of their success.

A good illustration of what I mean is his essay "Snow Falling on Readers", which examines the work of David Guterson. It is characteristic of Mallon's approach that, to understand the success of Guterson's biggest hit, he takes it on himself to read and discuss the author's entire work. Having done so, he ultimately finds it wanting. Characteristically, his summation is gentle, but damning nonetheless:

"I must confess that the real mystery to me is not what happened to Carl Heine aboard his fishing boat but just what on earth the PEN/Faulkner jurors were thinking - and beyond that, what all the local book-group readers who have made this No.1 can be seeing. A majority of these group readers - a discerning constituency who do much to keep literary fiction alive in America - are women, and it's the female characters in Guterson's books who are flimsy to the point of mere functionality, projections of male desire and indecision."

Compared with the mean-spirited hatchet job on Guterson that appears in "A Reader's Manifesto", which cannot escape giving the impression of being motivated by resentment at another's success, Mallon's evaluation reads like genuine literary criticism.

Which is not to say that all is high-minded and serious. Elsewhere in the same essay he makes the following throwaway, but devastatingly on-point, remark:

"I have been against homeschooling ever since that family-taught girl won the national spelling bee a few years back. This child who became such a point of pride to homeschooling parents couldn't stop shouting and jumping around and crowing about her moment of onstage accomplishment. I didn't care if she could spell 'arrhythmia' backwards; this unsocialized kid needed Miss Crabtree to put her in the corner."

Essays I particularly enjoyed were those on the David Leavitt-Stephen Spender lawsuit, on Howard Norman (whose 'The Bird Artist' I have always considered the antidote to the appalling 'Shipping News'), on Will Self, on Tom Wolfe's "A Man in Full". The essays on letters from his readers, on obituaries, on the ups and downs of the 'author book tour', and on the challenges of writing historical fiction are equally fascinating.

But what clinched things, and what earned this book its fifth star is the essay "Enough about Me", which expresses his civilized but eloquent antipathy to the "emergence of memoir as a hot new publishing commodity". Someone who mirrors my own thoughts on the matter, and can express them far more eloquently than I could. What's not to love?

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ISBN13: 978-0299203245
language: English
Subcategory: History and Criticism
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