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e-Book How Do Witches Fly?: A Practical Approach to Nocturnal Flights download

e-Book How Do Witches Fly?: A Practical Approach to Nocturnal Flights download

by Alexander Kuklin

ISBN: 0966402707
ISBN13: 978-0966402704
Language: English
Publisher: Dna Press; 1 edition (November 1, 1999)
Pages: 114
Category: New Age and Spirituality
Subategory: Religion

ePub size: 1964 kb
Fb2 size: 1326 kb
DJVU size: 1984 kb
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 661
Other Formats: azw lrf mbr doc

How Do Witches Fly? book.

How Do Witches Fly? book. Have you not always wondered as a child if witches really flew during. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. How Do Witches Fly?: A Practical Approach to Nocturnal Flights. by. Alexander Kuklin.

How Do Witches Fly? : A Practical Approach to Nocturnal Flights. By (author) Alexander Kuklin.

Books which examine the folklore of Europe's traditional witch plants are not uncommon, and some give some coverage to describing the psychotropic . How Do Witches Fly? Vol. 7 : A Practical Approach to Nocturnal Flights.

Books which examine the folklore of Europe's traditional witch plants are not uncommon, and some give some coverage to describing the psychotropic an. .

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Items related to How Do Witches Fly? . Books which examine the folklore of Europe's traditional "witch" plants are not uncommon, and some give some coverage to describing the psychotropic and hallucinogenic effects of these plants on the human body.

Items related to How Do Witches Fly?: A Practical Approach to Nocturnal. Alexander Kuklin How Do Witches Fly?: A Practical Approach to Nocturnal Flights. However this book is rather more unusual than that in that the author is first and foremost a biochemist with an extensive and intimate knowledge of the alkaloids, or poisonous constituents, for which the plants most commonly listed as being those of flying ointments are rightly famous.

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How Do Witches Fly? A practical approach to nocturnal flights. ISBN 13: 9780966402704.

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Alexander Kuklin discusses this in his book, How Do Witches Fly? (DNA Press, 1999.

Alexander Kuklin discusses this in his book, How Do Witches Fly? (DNA Press, 1999. Perhaps this is a clue as to how the witches of old didn’t get fatally poisoned by their flying ointments? A condition known as twilight sleep was once used to bring relief from the pains of childbirth, and the condition was produced by combining scopolamine from deadly nightshade with morphine from the opium poppy. Henbane contains atropine, scopolamine and hyoscyamine, and is so poisonous that a paste of the herb was smeared on the arrows of some tribes of the ancient Celts

How do witches fly?: a practical approach to nocturnal flights.

How do witches fly?: a practical approach to nocturnal flights. in English - 1st ed. Libraries near you: WorldCat.

Books which examine the folklore of Europe's traditional "witch" plants are not uncommon, and some give some coverage to describing the psychotropic and hallucinogenic effects of these plants on the human body. However this book is rather more unusual than that in that the author is first and foremost a biochemist with an extensive and intimate knowledge of the alkaloids, or poisonous constituents, for which the plants most commonly listed as being those of flying ointments are rightly famous. Although there is much folkloric material here there is a great quantity of scientific material concerning the physiological effects of the plants and their constituents which is otherwise not easily available to the average reader. Of particular interest, though they may prove distressing for some readers, are the accounts of experiments conducted on bitches to determine the ability of the alkaloids to be absorbed into the body through the vaginal membranes, as well as details of the ways in which the various constituents react against one another to produce sometimes surprising results. For example, one might have imagined that using both aconite (aconitine) and belladonna (atropine) together would have produced a doubly toxic effect on the user, but not so: the two alkaloids have antagonistic (or opposing) toxic effects upon each other, each neutralizing the most toxic effects of the other while leaving the hallucinogenic effects of both largely intact. This is, in short, a fascinating book for those interested in what these plants actually do (rather than what we think they ought to do) to the user.
Comments:
Malak
This book probably made a decent brief article or journal note but was obviously inflated to book length by including a lot of information that is not especially pertinent and that can be found all over the web. The gist of the book (contained in about 3 pages) is that flying ointments were based on the antidotal action of paired herbs, such as tropane-containing plants like belladonna and opiates, or tropanes and aconite. This kind of antagonism has historical uses in botanical medicine--an example is the "twilight sleep" of painless childbirth. That flying ointments were based on this antagonism is a good idea, but Kuklin doesn't develop it, and he undermines much of what was in the book by including everything but the kitchen sink about psychoactive and magickal herbs, some of which, like blue water lily, could in no way have been used in West European flying ointments. Occasional howlers likewise make the reader wonder about the validity of the book's information. For instance, Kuklin writes, "The author Jong gives a 'Traditional English' recipe in his book _Witches_" and then cites a recipe from that work. Kuklin is here referring to the fiction writer Erica Jong's ruminations on witchcraft as if it were a historical study written by a man. Generally, this book is a disappointment. It gives the impression of being thrown together by someone who saw a way to make a quick buck. Too bad Kuklin didn't take the time to actually develop this idea.

Ranicengi
This has got to be one of the most poorly written books I've seen in years. This is the kind of book that leaves a black mark on a publisher's reputation. By the way, a little homework will reveal that the author is the owner of the publishing company. To him I ask, "Were you too cheap to hire a proofreader?"

The book is full of serious issues like subject-verb agreement, sentences with missing subjects, overuse of the word "the." I found myself stumbling through the awkward text thinking, "I hope English is not his first language, because there is no real excuse for such poor writing."

The book is packed with claims about what happened in history. None of these claims have any references or footnotes. Was the author actually there, experiencing them first hand? That's the only time anyone should make a claim about historical facts that is not referenced. There are writings about documents that state this or that; none of them are referenced. There are no footnotes or references of any kind in the whole book! There is a bibliography, but it is also mixed in with "recommended literature."

Are there recipes for ointments? Yes, there are 3, but don't think they will tell you anything. None of them are useful because non-standard volumes are given. Just how big is "four handfulls?" How much cream is in "1 jar of cream?" What is the final concentration when I "blend with oil of your choice?"

The author lost me when he wrote of the "spinal chord." Though I've never heard the spinal chord, I admit I'm intrigued to know the sound.

At the end of the book is a very small list of abbreviations and measurement conversions. In it, the author tells us that milligram (mg) = 10^-3 kg. WRONG! Are you kidding me?! Basic chemistry students in high school know this stuff! Milligram = 10^-3 g or 10^-6 kg. I would never allow this guy to measure anything in my lab.

Just because someone has a PhD, doesn't mean they are smart. I have known quite a few PhD's who were dumber than a box of rocks. One can get a PhD just by getting through the work, not by being clever or insightful, and certainly not intelligent. I found it a little shoddy of the Doc to tell us in his biography that he "has published extensively in peer reviewed scientific journals." Most of the PhD's I've known never have to say that because it's what they do. Stating that is like stating that a fish swims extensively.

Other reviews here are likely by the publisher since the reviewer identified himself as "a Customer." Any review that gives high marks to a book, calling it a "treatise" though it has NO references to substantiate its claims, is an invalid review. These are the people who below on the Jerry Springer Show. And just because a book gives a warning about poisonous plants doesn't make it a good book, especially when it is a book about poisonous plants!

At the time of this review, this book was only for sale on Amazon as a used book. Asking price was $50. This is a book you can do without, even if you are a serious student of entheogens, history, botany, witchcraft, medieval studies or any other field. There is nothing in this book of merit. If you must look between its awful covers for proof of its failure, you should consider inter-library loan, which I'm glad was my method of stumbling through it.

I have scanned the whole book and will keep it in my private archive as an example to my witchcraft students what NOT to do.

Aloo
How Do Witches Fly? is an interesting, well-researched, and thorough. It's also dry and could be dangerous in the wrong hands. This is a scholarly discussion of the mechanisms used in witches' "flights." It is absolutely not for the squeamish or kids.
Author Alexander Kuklin has a PhD. in plant physiology and genetics, and is interested in how science and the occult relate. This makes him quite qualified to cover his chosen topic. Many of the ingredients are discussed in detail, from what part of the plant it comes from, what the toxin is, and exactly how it works and what it does to you. (Not for the queasy!) Some also have a historical background, with references from ancient Greece or the Middle Ages.
It doesn't belong in the hands of anyone under the age of 20. (Fortunately, many of these things are very difficult to obtain.) There are no warnings on the covers, but there are inside. I personally think that the publisher should have a surgeon general's-type warning on the cover. "Warning: Experimentation with the items discussed in this book could be extremely hazardous to your health." The only reason I don't give it a 5-star rating is because I feel there are too few warnings in the book.
My primary reason for reviewing this book is as a means to educate parents who might see this book in their kids' possession. There is nothing on the cover to indicate what's inside and that it's potentially dangerous information. The subject line on the back cover reads "Herbs/Biochemistry/Witchcraft/New Age." That sounds pretty harmless, right?
Secondarily, I think there are a few folks out there who have never heard of this book, and might find it as interesting as I did.

Burilar
After reading "How Do Witches Fly? A Practical Approach to Nocturnal Flights", I have a different perspective and new understanding of witches and their practices, far from the simplistic childhood image of evil women flying about on broomsticks. Through extensive research including sources from medieval times to the present, the author makes the case that witches had a masterful knowledge of many potent herbs. Detailed biochemical analyses of the components of various witches' concoctions suggest that just the right proportion of herbs and other ingredients helped the witches "fly".

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