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e-Book Brasyl download

e-Book Brasyl download

by Ian McDonald

ISBN: 0575080515
ISBN13: 978-0575080515
Language: English
Publisher: Gollancz (2007)
Pages: 512
Category: Science Fiction
Subategory: Science Fiction

ePub size: 1911 kb
Fb2 size: 1262 kb
DJVU size: 1637 kb
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 985
Other Formats: lit doc lrf azw

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Be seduced, amazed, and shocked by one of the world’s greatest and strangest nations.

He probably has more imagination than any other author out there. He creates futures that are totally bizarre and makes them completely believable.

Also by Ian McDonald from Gollancz: River of Gods. The right of Ian McDonald to be identified as the author.

Ian Macdonald's RIVER OF GODS, painted a vivid picture of a near future India, 100 years after independence. BRASYL will do the same for South America's largest and most vibrant country. It revolutionised British SF for a new generation by taking a perspective that was not European or American.

Be seduced, amazed, and shocked by one of the world’s greatest and strangest nations. McDonald inhabits the Brazil – or rather, the Brazils – of this world and sweeps you along as no other writer in the field could manage. Ian Macdonald's River of Gods, painted a vivid picture of a near future India, 100 years after independence

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Ian Macdonald's River of Gods, painted a vivid picture of a near future India, 100 years after independence. It revolutionised British science fiction for a new generation by taking a perspective that was not European or American. This is a story that begins in the favelas.

Ian McDonald is the author of Planesrunner, the first book of the Everness series. He has written thirteen science fiction novels-including the 2011 John W. Campbell Memorial Award winner for Best Novel, The Dervish House-and has lost count of the number of stories. He's been nominated for every major science fiction award, and he's even won some.

McDonald does with Brazil most everything he did with India. A sci-fi book told from three different characters' perspectives, one in modern day Brazil, one thirty years in the future, and one from the 1700's

McDonald does with Brazil most everything he did with India. Still, I was never as immersed in our South American country as I was in the Asian subcontinent. A sci-fi book told from three different characters' perspectives, one in modern day Brazil, one thirty years in the future, and one from the 1700's. The back cover hook told me they were all connected somehow. This was enough to get me interested, combined with the fact that I lived in Brazil for two years.

Author: Ian McDonald. Publisher: Pyr, 2007. British author McDonald’s outstanding SF novel channels the vitality of South America’s largest country into an edgy, post-cyberpunk free-for-all. McDonald sets up three separate characters in different eras - a cynical contemporary reality-TV producer, a near-future bisexual entrepreneur and a tormented 18th-century Jesuit agent. He then slams them together with the revelation that their worlds are strands of an immense quantum multiverse, and each of them is threatened.

I have always noticed that Mc Donald's in Brazil is very different than Mc Donald's in the U. I am not a fan of McDonald's by any means, but for someone who travels a lot around the world for work like I do, Mc Donald's has saved the day more times than I can count. Even when traveling around some parts of the US, you can always count on Mc Donald's for consistency and speed. So, what do you think?

Ian Macdonald's River of Gods, painted a vivid picture of a near future India, 100 years after independence. It revolutionised British science fiction for a new generation by taking a perspective that was not European or American. Brasyl will do the same for South America's largest and most vibrant country.

This is a story that begins in the favelas, the slums of Rio, and quickly expands to take in drugs, corruption, and a frightening new technology that allows access to all the multiple worlds that have slipped into existence in other planes every time we make a decision. This is rich, epic science fiction that opens our eyes to the world around us and posits mind-blowing alternative sciences. It is a landmark work in modern science fiction from one of its most respected practitioners.

Comments:
Kupidon
I love Ian McDonald, he wrote one of my absolute favorite books in Evolution's Shore. I was really looking forward to reading this one but frankly I was disappointed.

First of all, the excessive Portuguese. I usually really like unusual stylistic choices, but his use of Portuguese crossed way over the line and became an annoying affectation. It felt pretentious, and didn't add anything notable to the book. If the point was immersion, there are far more skillful ways to do that and this choice was really ham handed.

And I don't think that McDonald had the authority to use that much of an actively spoken foreign language that he doesn't speak, in his novel. Sadly some of the reviews I've seen from native speakers have blasted the awkward phrasing and weird use. Could you imagine someone doing this with English? Wait, that exists, and we call it Engrish and it's terribly awkward. Why would it be good writing to do it to another language? I can see he had consultants, and I am sure he did tons of research but that frankly is not enough.

Although that would have been forgivable, just annoying, had the content of the book stood up. Sadly it did not. I found the characters fairly interesting, unlike some reviewers who hated the MC-- she was pretty hate able, and I'm a little worried that this is the only type of interesting female character McDonald seems to enjoy writing, but she was also kind of hilarious in her hateability and very self aware of her flamboyant flaws. So I actually liked her-- which is why i felt betrayed when certain character changes happened near the end of the book which felt completely out of the blue and nonsensical. There was no real build up to her change in character into the person she was at the end, she was just one way in one chapter and totally different in the next.

Also the plot is a sloppy mess. Eighty percent interesting ideas building up to a final twenty percent "oh god I have to make the novel end the way I planned, how do I get from here to there" and the answer was contrived and boring.

The multiple time lines that bothered other people didn't bother me, I liked them. Just the stuff above.

Anyways, a disappointment. I expected better.

in waiting
This is my favorite of all of McDonald's works so far. He expertly weaves together three different stories in dramatically differing time periods but does this with such apparent ease and fluidity of language (including a lot of the Portuguese idiom) that the complexity of the whole work is illuminated but never overwhelming. Father Luis Quinn, an Irish Jesuit cleric sent by the Portuguese Jesuit authorities to "admonish" a fallen priest in the deep jungles of 18th century savage and slave-ridden colonial Brazil is also my favorite of all of McDonald's characters. Quinn, a huge strong paradox of a man with a dark past, asks only for a "task most difficult." He gets this and we get a brilliant read in return.

ᵀᴴᴱ ᴼᴿᴵᴳᴵᴻᴬᴸ
I knew a lot of it was nonsense. In particular, his alternate timelines and his explanation of quantum theory; but I was more than willing to let it pass. It helped that Ian MacDonald made the background seem real. In fact, he did some research to make it seem, and it is the only action/adventure I know of with a bibliography. Of course, it also helped that he placed his tale in an exotic location.

Iraraeal
I loved this book, for so many reasons!

First off, I'm a native Irish speaker, from Galway, so when Quinn launched into the commentary of how language shapes mind, I was in complete sympathy.

Next, it seems like a bunch of authors (like this one) are jumping on the "multiverse" theme these days. Good for them. It's a fun thing to explore, and I enjoy what's coming out of it. Having earned a degree in physics, and having heard about the devil creating the interface, well, I just love the Q-blade.

Beyond that, well, I've been to Rio, love the city, and the chase scenes play out very true to life. I'm sure the author does Sao Paulo equally well.

Reading this book, and "Anathem", I am filled with hope that we'll have languages strong enough to describe (flip side: solve) NP-hard problems within the next 20 years. How *that* will change us!

What a great world we live in. What a great book.

UPDATE (3/31/2010): The opening bit of this books now exists in the US, as the series "Bait Car."

Zicelik
This was a complex read but the whole thing has really stuck with me. The characters and their surroundings are fleshed out with intricate aesthetics and the premise continues to be thought-provoking several months later.

Pedora
The concept is interesting; although the writing is a bit chaotic. But the main problem was that if a writer intends to use words from another language to illustrate the narrative, he/she should always ask for support from native speakers, Brazilian Portuguese, in this case; although the writer thanks some Brazilian Portuguese-speaking people at the end, there are blatant errors which lead to the question "where they Brazilian Portuguese native speakers?".

And a note on the electronic version: there was too much space between paragraphs; a single space would suffice, except for when there is a change of "scene".

Utchanat
This was the first book by Ian McDonald I have read. The plot was interesting, even engaging at times. But the writing was horribly loose and overwritten, and especially in the beginning before I got used to large amount of Portuguese words scattered everywhere this was really, really slow read.
Why say something simply, when you can use a few flowery and long sentences without commas to say the same thing? :-) This book didn't give me any need to sample something else McDonald has written. Second this years' Hugo nominated book I have read. At this time "No award" is still my first choice in the novel category.

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