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e-Book Going Gray: What I Learned about Beauty, Sex, Work, Motherhood, Authenticity, and Everything Else That Really Matters download

e-Book Going Gray: What I Learned about Beauty, Sex, Work, Motherhood, Authenticity, and Everything Else That Really Matters download

by Anne Kreamer

ISBN: 0316166618
ISBN13: 978-0316166614
Language: English
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company; 1st Printing edition (September 10, 2007)
Pages: 224
Category: Relationships
Subategory: Self-Help

ePub size: 1902 kb
Fb2 size: 1196 kb
DJVU size: 1806 kb
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 413
Other Formats: lrf mobi docx azw

Anne Kreamer thought she was a youthful 49 until she saw a photo taken. At 49, Anne Kreamer has had (several) successful careers as well as a happy marriage and a Going Gray : What I Learned About Beauty, Sex, Work, Motherhood by Anne Kreamer is an easy read on a seemingly light-weight subject-but one that I find intensely interesting (as I suspect many women do)-hair. The book is also concerned with a more obviously serious subject, aging.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Going Gray: What I Learned about Beauty, Sex .

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Going Gray: What I Learned about Beauty, Sex, Work, Motherhood, Authenticity, and Everything Else That Really Matters.

To read Anne Kreamer’s Going Gray is to enjoy that comfortable illusions that you are chatting with a friend. A friend whose confidences are told in a way that’s concise, entertaining, and thoughtful.

Going Gray: What I Learned about Beauty, Sex, Work, Motherhood, Authenticity, and Everything Else Th. Anne Kreamer considered herself a youthful 49 until a photo of herself with her teenage daughter stopped her in her tracks. In one unguarded moment she saw herself for what she really was - a middle-aged woman with her hair dyed much too harshly.

Bibliographic Details. Books are sent via US Postal Service unless other arrangements are requested

Bibliographic Details Publisher: Little, Brown and Company, . Publication Date: 2007. Anne Kreamer is the former executive vice-president and worldwide creative director of Nickelodeon/Nick at Nite, and a co-founder of SPY magazine. She currently writes a monthly column for Martha Stewart Living and is a former columnist for Fast Company. Books are sent via US Postal Service unless other arrangements are requested. For INTERNATIONAL PURCHASES, PLEASE contact M & M Books at mandmbksl.

Read "Going Gray What I Learned about Beauty, Sex, Work .

In one unguarded moment she saw herself for what she really was - a middle-aged woman with her hair dyed much too harshly.

Anne Kreamer explored the social ramifications and self-discovery that surrounds going gray in her book, Going Gray: What I Learned About Beauty, Sex, Work, Motherhood, Authenticity, and Everything Else That Really Matters, but she was 49 when she made the decision.

Anne Kreamer explored the social ramifications and self-discovery that surrounds going gray in her book, Going Gray: What I Learned About Beauty, Sex, Work, Motherhood, Authenticity, and Everything Else That Really Matters, but she was 49 when she made the decision to let it show.

Anne Kreamer is the author of Going Gray: What I Learned about Beauty, Sex, Work, Motherhood, Authenticity and Everything Else that Really Matters, a former executive vice president and worldwide creative director of Nickelodeon, part of the founding team of SPY magazine, an. .

Anne Kreamer is the author of Going Gray: What I Learned about Beauty, Sex, Work, Motherhood, Authenticity and Everything Else that Really Matters, a former executive vice president and worldwide creative director of Nickelodeon, part of the founding team of SPY magazine, and a onetime columnist for both Fast Company and Martha Stewart Living. Her work has appeared in Time, Real Simple, Travel & Leisure, and More. She graduated from Harvard College and lives in Brooklyn with her husband, the writer Kurt Andersen.

Anne Kreamer (born 1955) is an American journalist and author who specializes in business, work/life .

Anne Kreamer (born 1955) is an American journalist and author who specializes in business, work/life balance, culture, and women's issues. In 2007 she published Going Gray: What I Learned about Beauty, Sex, Work, Motherhood, Authenticity and Everything Else That Really Matters (Little, Brown and Company

Электронная книга "Risk/Reward: Why Intelligent Leaps and Daring Choices Are the Best Career Moves You Can Make", Anne Kreamer

Электронная книга "Risk/Reward: Why Intelligent Leaps and Daring Choices Are the Best Career Moves You Can Make", Anne Kreamer. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Risk/Reward: Why Intelligent Leaps and Daring Choices Are the Best Career Moves You Can Make" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Anne Kreamer considered herself a youthful 49 until a photo of herself with her teenage daughter stopped her in her tracks. In one unguarded moment she saw herself for what she really was -- a middle-aged woman with her hair dyed much too harshly. In that one moment Kreamer realized that she wasn't fooling anyone about her age and decided it was time to get real and embrace a more authentic life. She set out for herself a program to let her hair become its true color, and along the way discovered her true self. Going Gray is Kreamer's exploration of that experience, and a frank, warm and funny investigation of aging as a female obsession. Through interviews, field experiments, and her own everywoman's chronicle, Kreamer probes the issues behind two of the biggest fears aging women face: Can I be sexually attractive as a gray-haired, middle-aged woman? and Will I be discriminated against in the work world? Her answers will surprise you.In searching for the balance between attractiveness and authenticity, Kreamer's journey of middle-aging illiminates in a friendly, useful, and entertaining way the politics and personal costs of this generation's definition of "aging gracefully.
Comments:
Molotok
I bought this book almost two years ago when I decided to go grey, but still wanted to look fashionable and not like I had given up on my appearance. Amazon sells several books about going grey, but this one I liked best because it was the most fashion focused. Other going grey books I previewed were either a little bit too political/sociological or more "you go girl" esteem building for my taste.

This is actually a memoir of Kreamer's own going grey experience, but she includes many interesting asides from her research on fashion, celebrities and dating. Ms. Kreamer has a magazine writing background, in fashion as well as my favorite magazine of all time, Spy. She makes good use of her experience and access to the fashion world in giving advice on how to go grey with style.

Kreamer chose the option of getting platinum blonde highlights in or to camouflage her growing ow her grey roots, and she details some of problems with this method. Since I look horrible with blonde hair, I chose the less expensive option of just growing out my hair, but using Aveda Blue Malva shampoo and conditioner to make the colored part of my hair less brassy.

The most important thing I learned from this book is that going grey will almost always make you look older, but it can easily make you look better and much more interesting. In the author's before and after pictures, she looks like a pretty but blah woman in her forties with dyed brown hair, but a gorgeous, chic and interesting woman in her fifties with her grey hair.

It's also nice to have hair that always goes with your complexion. Even if you get the best hair colorist in the world, and you use all of the special for-colored-hair products, your hair color is only going to look perfect for a week at most. After that, your color will gradually become warmer than your complexion until it is colored again.

Kreamer discusses some silver haired celebrities. Of course, she discusses model Carmen, and also Steve Martin and Emmy Lou Harris. If I may add my 2 cents worth about Emmy Lou Harris's grey tresses: yes, her hair looks glorious on stage and in photos, but I used to go to the same gym as Harris, and when her long grey hair isn't meticulously styled, she just looks like your typical Wiccan herb gardener who sells amulets at Renaissance festivals (not that there's anything wrong with that). If you want to look beautiful and stylish with super long grey hair, be willing to put in a whole lot of work. One celebrity who I wish Kreame had mentioned is Heloise of the Hints From Heloise column in Good Housekeeping magazine. Her hair was white in her thirties, and I always thought she looked stunning.

One celebrity that never went grey but should have and is not mentioned in the book is Jackie O. I believe that there must be some unwritten rule among style writers (or perhaps any writers) that one can never describe Jackie O's style as anything less than absolutely always perfect. But since I'm not a style writer I will: Jackie looked great in those early '60's styles that suited her figure and personality perfectly. But in old age she continued to color her hair black. Almost any style guide will say that this is a huge no-no for self-evident reasons, yet fashionistas continue to tout Jackie as perhaps the most elegant and stylish woman that ever lived. I would have loved to have seen Jackie go grey. I bet she would have done it beautifully.

Mr.Savik
Okay, I'll admit it. I needed a bit of support in order to garner the strength to let my natural silver grow out. My family heritage from my father's side is to go prematurely gray. He was 100% gray by age 20, my brother by age 30. After the monthly ritual of coloring my hair for twenty years in order to maintain my idea of 'youth' I had no idea when I went 100% gray, but I do know the silver sprouts started in my teens. They were growing in earnest after the birth of my first child in my 20's, thus the haircolor habit began.

I had been toying with the idea of going natural for several years. I eat organic food, plus use natural cosmetics and cleaners. It seemed counter intuitive to be soaking my scalp in petroleum chemicals once a month so other people would view me a certain way (i.e. young). I developed an allergic reaction to haircolor last August, culminating in welts on my scalp and forehead. The final decision was made for me. I'll let the silver grow out.

After coloring my hair for all these years, going natural made me face my fears. I could hide behind blonde hair all these years; it gives the illusion of youth. But, it can also blur individuality. At one point, it is possible to blend in with the other 40 or 50 or 60-something dye-job blondes. I don't want to erase who I am, it is time to define it. There is no more hiding when you go gray.

Anne Kreamer's research and insight gave me the boost I needed, plus looking at images of gorgeous silver-haired ladies online. (Emmylou Harris is stunning. Jamie Lee Curtis is my hero.) Okay...if they can do this, so can I.

My natural color is about 50% grown out now, and I have to say that it's more of a sparkling silver than I realized. I might actually like this better than the blonde. I have an appointment with my hairdresser in a few weeks when I'll have the last of the blonde cut out and say goodbye to "her," the artificial blonde former me and hello to the actual, authentic me. Thanks for your help in this process, Anne.

Capella
Having decided to transition to my natural silver color, I read Ms. Kreamer's book in hopes of understanding her journey. I wanted to know what led her to so significant a change, how she got through the process (and it is a process), and what outcome she achieved. I hoped, as well, to hear other women's stories. Maybe too much to ask? Must have been, because what I got was a bit on her "why," and a whole lot on social and economic pressure, both in support of and vehemently opposed to gray. Lots of, "harder to get a job," "Yes, men will find you attractive," and "Californians spend a great deal of money trying to look younger." Seemed a bit trite and all too predictable. Like reading a Sociology text with name-dropping. Missing? A story. A personal exploration. But perhaps I missed the point :)

Oppebro
I love this book. Been I while since I bought it. In my late 50s I decided to 'embrace' my gray. As a gradual process I switched from permanent gray coverage to using a demi and gradually let the salt/pepper color grow out. Use this process as opposed to cutting hair short. At the same time I decided to embrace my waves/curls. Tired of pretended I had straight brunette hair when I had gray wavy hair! I enjoyed this woman's story of her process.

Cobyno
I went back to this book twice. Once before I worked up the nerve to stop coloring my hair and a few years later as I finally did it to see if I had a better opinion than the first time. Anne's "journey" makes for a good magazine article but a long winded self absorbed trek and boring book. I agree with other reviewers that photos would have been helpful. There is a certain amount of insight missing from this and a warmth that other than being so much about her would make this a more endearing read.

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