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e-Book Nietzsche's Teaching: An Interpretation of Thus Spoke Zarathustra download

e-Book Nietzsche's Teaching: An Interpretation of Thus Spoke Zarathustra download

by Laurence Lampert

ISBN: 0300035608
ISBN13: 978-0300035605
Language: English
Publisher: Yale Univ Pr; 1st edition (March 1, 1987)
Pages: 400
Category: Philosophy
Subategory: Sociology

ePub size: 1909 kb
Fb2 size: 1134 kb
DJVU size: 1668 kb
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 447
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Nietzsche's Teaching book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Nietzsche's Teaching: An Interpretation of "Thus Spoke Zarathustra" as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

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Thus Spoke Zarathustra. 49 MB·4,255 Downloads. Thus Spoke Zarathustra: A Book for All and None. Note on the text xliii. 1001 Motivational Quotes for Success Great Quotes from Great Minds. 35 MB·17,219 Downloads.

The first comprehensive interpretation of Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra -an .

The first comprehensive interpretation of Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra -an important and difficult text and the only book Nietzsche ever wrote with characters, events, setting, and a plot. An impressive piece of scholarship

Thus Spoke Zarathustra: A Book for All and None. Nietzsche's Teaching: An Interpretation of Thus Spoke Zarathustra. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Thus Spoke Zarathustra: A Book for All and None. Thus Spoke Zarathustra was conceived while Nietzsche was writing The Gay Science; he made a small note, reading "6,000 feet beyond man and time", as evidence of this.

Lampert is a long time professor at Indiana University and well known contemporary Nietzsche scholar

Lampert is a long time professor at Indiana University and well known contemporary Nietzsche scholar. While Zarathustra is sometimes overlooked by modern readers, Nietzsche himself viewed it as an important part of his corpus. While unfortunate the fact that Zarathustra has failed to garner a greater non-academic audience is not entirely surprising.

The first comprehensive interpretation of Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra-an important and difficult text and the only book Nietzsche . Nietzsche's Teaching: An Interpretation of "Thus Spoke Zarathustra".

The first comprehensive interpretation of Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra-an important and difficult text and the only book Nietzsche ever wrote with characters,.

admired Zarathustra’s Teaching, Laurence Lampert presents us with its natural follow.

New Haven CT: Yale University Press, 2001. After publishing the fourth and final part of Thus Spake Zarathustra at his own. expense in May of 1885, Nietzsche faced a quite unprecedented al. What does one who, in his considered opinion, has just published the greatest thing. admired Zarathustra’s Teaching, Laurence Lampert presents us with its natural follow. up, an interpretation of BGE. Beyond Good and Evil is probably the most widely read and taught of Nietzsche’s.

The first comprehensive interpretation of Nietzsche'sThus Spoke Zarathustra-an important and difficult text and the only book Nietzsche ever wrote with characters, events, setting, and a plot. An impressive piece of scholarship. by Friedrich Nietzsche. Based on the Thomas Common Translation Extensively modified by Bill Chapko. In his autobiography Nietzsche said that Zarathustra was by far his most inspired and most important book, and that the "basic conception of this work" was the idea of "eternal recurrence". This idea is intimately in-volved with what he calls "love of fate", "that one wants nothing to be different, not forward, not backward, not in all eternity.

With this book, Laurence Lampert answers that question. Nietzsche’s Teaching: An Interpretation of "Thus Spoke Zarathustra". He does so through his trademark technique of close readings of key works in Nietzsche's journey to philosophy: The Birth of Tragedy, Schopenhauer as Educator, Richard Wagner in Bayreuth, Human All Too Human, and "Sanctus Januarius," the final book of the 1882 Gay Science.

The first comprehensive interpretation of Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra-an important and difficult text and the only book Nietzsche ever wrote with characters, events, setting, and a plot. Laurence Lampert's chapter-by-chapter commentary on Nietzsche's magnum opus clarifies not only Zarathustra's narrative structure but also the development of Nietzsche's thinking as a whole. "An impressive piece of scholarship. Insofar as it solves the riddle of Zarathustra in an unprecedented fashion, this study serves as an invaluable resource for all serious students of Nietzsche's philosophy. Lampert's persuasive and thorough interpretation is bound to spark a revival of interest in Zarathustra and raise the standards of Nietzsche scholarship in general."-Daniel W. Conway, Review of Metaphysics "A book of scholarship, filled with passion and concern for its text."-Tracy B. Strong, Review of Politics "This is the first genuine textual commentary on Zarathustra in English, and therewith a genuine reader's guide. It makes a significant and original contribution to its field."-Werner J. Dannhauser, Cornell University "This is a very valuable and carefully wrought study of a very complex and subtle poetic-philosophical work that provides access to Nietzsche's style of presenting his thought, as well as to his passionately affirmed values. Lampert's commentary and analysis of Zarathustra is so thorough and detailed. . . that it is the most useful English-language companion to Nietzsche's 'edifying' and intriguing work."-Choice Selected as one of Choice's outstanding academic books for 1988
Comments:
Mr_KiLLaURa
If you understand Zarathustra without a degree in philosophy, props to you.

JoJosho
Prof. Lampert's analysis is exegetically profound.

Jesmi
I would affirm the other positive reviews on this book and go one step further. If you are reading Thus Spoke
Zarathustra even for the second or third time you must read it in conjunction with Lampert's commentary. Its brilliance is stunning. Lampert consistently gives me insight and further understanding where I would have thought none would be possible. He supersedes all previous commentators and has not yet been superseded in return. Taking an almost random example from his text, his explanation of the key chapter "The Convalescent" includes an observation that the snake whose head is bitten by Zarathustra is ascribed a second identity, i.e. the teaching of "the Soothsayer" that "Everything is the same: nothing is of worth: knowledge chokes." Zarathustra is almost choked by this (as if a snake had entered his mouth and was biting the inside of his throat). Lampert then asks "Does Schopenhauer's knowledge [identified with the pessimism of the Soothsayer], his insight into life as endless meaningless cycles, require Schopenhauer's judgment that life is no good? What almost chokes Zarathustra is the possibility that what is highest and best in man, his spirited inquiry into himself and the world, must itself end by choking mankind.. [B]iting the head...requires that [Zarathustra] deny the Soothsayer's judgment on knowledge [while at the same time affirming the eternal recurrence of the smallest man]... .Knowledge does not require the Soothsayer's conclusion." (218) I am not sure I have yet grasped the full implications of this thought, but it intrigues. Lampert does this to me again and again and again. How do I read Thus Spoke Zarathustra? First read a chapter of Nietzsche, then the commentary by Lampert, then reread the chapter by Nietzsche. Of course Lampert is not perfect and he can over-interpret (but seldom does). To go even further, this is perhaps the best commentary I have ever read about anything. There is almost no point in reading Thus Spoke Zarathustra if you do not also read Lampert.

Uttegirazu
Published in 1986 by Yale University Press, Laurence Lampert's `Nietzsche's Teaching' is a commentary on Nietzsche's philosophical fable `Thus spoke Zarathustra'. Lampert is a long time professor at Indiana University and well known contemporary Nietzsche scholar.

While Zarathustra is sometimes overlooked by modern readers, Nietzsche himself viewed it as an important part of his corpus. While unfortunate the fact that Zarathustra has failed to garner a greater non-academic audience is not entirely surprising. Nietzsche's particular form of literary philosophy can be difficult at the best of times; Zarathustra his most poetic major work is downright abstruse; heavily laden with historic, literary and aphilosophical allusions - it is nearly impenetrable without a skilled guide. Fortunately, Lampert is just such a guide, his elegant prose combined with his informed and sensitive reading provides valuable insight in to many of Nietzsche's key themes (overman, will to power and eternal recurrence). As other reviewers have noted, a potential down side of using a commentary, especially a persuasive commentary such as this one, is risk that the reader take it as the definitive interpretation of the text (this is also a risk with a compelling professor). In my view this small risk is more than offset by the insight that Lampert provides.

Overall this is an excellent guide to an important and difficult work. I highly recommend it for all Nietzsche lovers. While I have not had an opportunity to read them, Lampert's other work on Nietzsche may also be worth a look.

Rocky Basilisk
I consider Thus Spake Zarathustra one of the greatest works in history. It is so such a pleasure to read; deep, clear, confusing, subtle as a hammer here and as a tuneing fork there. It is still capable of creating shouts of delight by revealing new insight after a dozen readings. As such it is always a pleausre to examine the things that others have gotten out of it. Expecially if that other is the careful reader and critic that Lampert is. As an amuture scholar of this work, it is almost impossible to find anyone worth ( in terms of providing new insight) discussing it with, so unless you are on campus, in some sort of philosophy club, etc, Lampert could become your best enemy to challenge your current ideas and lead you to new ones. Just remember not to take everything he says as an absolute answer. After all, at the end of the first part of TSZ, Zarathustra tells his students to go away and not come back until they have rejected him. Only when the sudent thinks for himself will Zarathustra love him.

Djang
This study of Neitzsche's masterpiece is (as can be gleaned by its sheer size) one of the most detailed secondary works on TSZ out there. The book is extremely well written, and the author clearly takes his subject seriously--but that is not to say that I recommend it. In fact, I suggest you don't read it because it is so detailed and well written. TSZ is definitely a book that people will walk away from with a different understanding, just like the Bible, and that is precisely one of TSZ's (and all of Nietzsche's philosophy)strengths--each person has their own idea. Even though the subtitle of this work says it is a subjective interpretation, it is not presented as such. After reading it, and going back to Zarathustra, what you read can't help but be affected by Lampert's objective ideas. The book though has some great points: it uncovers the well subsumed storyline, offers interesting insight to its relation with some of Nietzsche's other books, and points out some flaws in existing translation. BUT, do not open this book until you have read Thus Spoke Zarathustra about a dozen times and formed your own opinion about it; TSZ's strength lies in its subjectivity, and should not be viewed objectively.

ISBN: 0192805835
ISBN13: 978-0192805836
language: English
Subcategory: History and Criticism
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