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e-Book Emirati Women: Generations of Change download

e-Book Emirati Women: Generations of Change download

by Jane Bristol-Rhys

ISBN: 1849040982
ISBN13: 978-1849040983
Language: English
Publisher: Hurst & Co. (September 1, 2010)
Pages: 208
Category: Politics and Government
Subategory: Sociology

ePub size: 1891 kb
Fb2 size: 1904 kb
DJVU size: 1398 kb
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 988
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In preparing this work, the author has used both her decades of regional experience and her r stint as a lecturer at Abu Dhabi's Zayed University to admirable effect. Jane Bristol-Rhys provides an interesting new look at the lives of UAE women

Traditional Emirati Dance by students from EIS-Meadows at the Al Habtoor Group EEA 2014 . GENERATIONS OF CHANGE SUNG BY JOE AITKEN - Продолжительность: 4:45 Ian Anderson Recommended for you. 4:45.

Traditional Emirati Dance by students from EIS-Meadows at the Al Habtoor Group EEA 2014 - Продолжительность: 3:17 alhabtoorgroup Recommended for yo. Краткая история татар - Продолжительность: 16:06 Shigabutdin Marjani Recommended for you.

Jane Bristol-Rhys merges eight years of conversations and interviews with three generations of women and her own personal observations on Abu Dhabi society, boldly confronting the unflattering stereotypes that quietly flourish among expatriate communities.

Emirati Women: Generations of Change. 00 ISBN 978-0199327270. Volume 47 Issue 1 - Mary Ann Fay. New York and London: Oxford University Press, 2010. Emirati Women: Generations of Change. C. Hurst and Co/Columbia University Press: London. Emirati Identity Issues: Discourse and Reality.

item 5 Bristol-Rhys Jane-Emirati Women (Generations Of Change) BOOK NEW -Bristol-Rhys Jane-Emirati .

item 5 Bristol-Rhys Jane-Emirati Women (Generations Of Change) BOOK NEW -Bristol-Rhys Jane-Emirati Women (Generations Of Change) BOOK NEW. £1. 1. item 6 Emirati Women: Generations of Change, Paperback, by Jane Bristol-Rhys -Emirati Women: Generations of Change, Paperback, by Jane Bristol-Rhys. Jane Bristol-Rhys is a an Arabic-speaking cultural anthropologist who has lived in the Middle East for twenty years and has taught at Zayed University Abu Dhabi since 2001, having formerly taught in Egypt for many years. She is the author of many articles on the UAE. Country of Publication.

Telephone: 02 599 3617. More recently, I have examined how Emirati men perceive men from other cultures and nations, like South Asians. Current work includes the life of Sheikh Shakhbut bin Sultan; his rule; how he became so maligned and ignored; and, now, his return to Emirati historical narratives. Hurst Publishers, 2010. Islamic Feminism in Kuwait: The Politics and Paradoxes by Alessandra L. González. Journal of Middle East Women's Studies 10 (2), 161-163, 2014. Migration and New International Actors: An Old Phenomenon Seen With New Eyes.

In Emirati Women, Bristol-Rhys weaves together eight years of conversations and interviews with three generations of women, her .

In Emirati Women, Bristol-Rhys weaves together eight years of conversations and interviews with three generations of women, her observations of Emirati society in Abu Dhabi, the unflattering stereotypes commonly heard in the extensive expatriate communities, and discussions with her Emirati university students on topics ranging from marriage, independence, freedom, and the future.

The discovery of oil in the late 1960s catapulted the people of Abu Dhabi out of the isolating poverty into which it had plunged in the 1930s and onto the global stage. Massive construction projects built the city and infrastructural developments altered the physical and cultural landscape; in a few breathtaking decades, the lives of Emiratis were transformed by new opportunities and a social welfare system that offered free education, medical treatment, generous pensions, subsidies to families, and government incentives offered to citizens to participate in all sectors of the economy. Oil wealth also brought new expectations and new life-styles that are often sophisticated and lavish yet just as often criticized for being conspicuous displays of unbridled consumerism. Emirati Women offers a rare view into the lives of Emirati women and how they perceive the changes that have made poverty a dim and almost forgotten memory. In Emirati Women, Bristol-Rhys weaves together eight years of conversations and interviews with three generations of women, her observations of Emirati society in Abu Dhabi, the unflattering stereotypes commonly heard in the extensive expatriate communities, and discussions with her Emirati university students on topics ranging from marriage, independence, freedom, and the future.
Comments:
Ber
As its title suggests, this book explores the lives of women who are citizens of the United Arab Emirates. There is very little information on these women in English (or, I suspect, any other language, including Arabic), partly because UAE Nationals are vastly outnumbered in their own country by expatriates (who make up at least 85% of the country's resident population, according to most estimates), and partly because Emirati women are the segment of the population that is least accessible to foreign observers. As a result, while there has been an increasing number of books lately on the UAE and other Gulf states, few if any have had much to say about Emirati women based on personal access. Jane Bristol-Rhys is to be thanked, therefore, for showing the rest of us a bit of that world. This is not "peek behind the veil" exotica, however. The author is an anthropologist who has lived and worked in the UAE since 2001, and in the Middle East for over two decades. She is a serious scholar and long-time student of the Arab world. At the same time, she has been fortunate to forge close personal friendships with numerous Emirati women. As a result, she brings to her study both a scholar's eye and a confidante's sympathies and knowledge, and she manages to strike a nice balance between the two. The book is both serious and accessible--an enjoyable read that provides both first-hand accounts and scholarly detachment. The overarching theme that connects the various sections of the book is a familiar one: the tension between tradition and modernity. In the case of the UAE, this theme is given a particular edge by the rapidity with which this transition has taken place, and by the massive amount of wealth that has been created in the process, primarily because of oil. (The book focuses on women in Abu Dhabi, which owns nearly all of the UAE's oil and has one of the largest known reserves of oil in the world. Dubai, for all its flash and headline-capturing qualities, has very little oil wealth, depending instead on other kinds of economic activity.) Without focusing on any particular family as far as we can tell, the author tracks the experiences and views of three generations of Abu Dhabi women. The differences are stark. At the risk of oversimplifying a more complex story, today's generation of university-aged women want to enjoy the comforts of their city-state's new wealth, while their grandmothers, though not denying that life is much easier now, lament the loss of tradition that has accompanied the ease afforded by riches (though not to all Emiratis are rich, of course). Bristol-Rhys also discusses a number of specific issues that have attracted attention in recent years: perceived threats to national identity, including the Arabic language; the problems created by Emirati men marrying non-Emirati women; the disconnect between the ways many foreigners see Emirati women and the ways they see themselves. This is not a long book, but it was obviously written by someone with deep knowledge of, and affection for, her subject. Because of the inside story it provides, this is the book I will recommend to friends who are considering visiting the UAE or moving to Abu Dhabi.

Jark
Bristol-Rhys makes abundant information on women in UAE readily available to others through this book. Her writing style is difficult to read at times because every sentence is packed with meaning and wastes no space in delivering the richest description possible. This book has challenged me to ask new questions and explore more about this rarely-publicized and hard-to-research population.

I appreciated how Bristol-Rhys waited to discuss marriage until later in the book. The importance of marriage to Emirati students and young females was hard to ignore - but I got the impression that Emirati women are desperately clinging to the men in their lives (especially depending on cousins for marriage) because they don't know anyone else, and especially because they are not allowed to marry anyone else. This text illustrated how separation of religion and state in UAE is virtually non-existent which is a tough concept for me, an American, to grasp.

Bristol-Rhys took great care and time to document her observations and conclusions about Emirati women, a rather immobilized yet cherished population. While some delicate subjects were not explored, such as sex trafficking and abuse to housemaids, this book shows a slice of the world through the hijab. This book is a thoughtful and thorough account of Emirati woman and would be a valuable addition to any gender studies, anthropology, sociology, or intercultural course. 'Emirati Women' sets a good example of responsible ethnographic research and representation, while staying accessible and immediate to readers. As it's a fairly short read, I was left wanting much, much more of Bristol-Rhys' information and insight.

Bundis
As an educator who once worked with young Emirati women I was interested to see how the author's experience mirrored my own. I found several similarities, and was happily surprised by many insightful observations.

The author's "research" is based on conversations made or overheard in situations to which I never had, nor ever will have, access. Part of this is because of Bristol-Rhys' position at a premier university, where students and their families are less likely to be frightened by outsiders and their perhaps sometimes uncomfortable questions. But the bigger reason is because I am male and would therefore never be invited to female-only ceremonies, nor even be invited to have a tea with the ladies at home. After a decade in country, it appears Rhys has done something few outsiders are able to manage these days, to create meaningful and lasting relationships with Emiratis. It helps, of course, that she speaks Arabic and has lived in the Middle East far longer than her time in the UAE.

Her sympathies clearly lie with her subjects, but with few exceptions she doesn't bend over backwards to excuse or protect them. It seemed to me she protests a bit too loudly about the stereotypical pampered, indolent Emirati. Clearly anyone who has worked in education has seen plenty of examples of such; even those who have never visited the UAE can get a good idea of the problem simply by reading the press. One of the government's own senior officers only last month complained that getting Emiratis to work in the private sector won't happen unless salaries are subsidized to a level to which Emiratis are accustomed as employees of the state.

A couple of interesting tidbits to which I had never before been exposed include the Emirati equivalent of one female calling another a slut ("She dresses like a Lebanese."), and the euphemism for someone who has engaged in inappropriate behavior as being "On the Road to Liwa" (the UAE's corner of the Empty Quarter). For those that fail out of college, Rhys notes that within 2-3 months most end up married. Unfortunately she doesn't let us know how this plays out in the families. Does the bride's family have to scramble to find a less attractive cousin willing to take a bride lacking academic credentials? Is this a chance for men to marry up? If most marriage arrangements are made before the participants begin college, does the bride's family have to justify or somehow compensate for passing on "damaged" goods?

This is a short book (134 pages + notes), accessibly written, and providing the rest of the world a glimpse onto a small corner of the world that hasn't until now been documented. Opinion surveys of Emirati women by generation, class, and occupation would have been a welcome addition to the project. Despite any shortcomings, we should be thankful to the author for sharing her experiences with us.

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